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Welcome to the 2017 UMaine Student Symposium: Research and Creative Activity electronic event program. This electronic program includes student abstracts, student presentation style descriptions, and presentation schedules. It also includes a map of the venue layout, schedule of the entire day’s events and programs, as well as details and information regarding our sponsors and selected university programs.

We hope you enjoy a full day of student presentations, guest speakers, award ceremonies, and the chance to network with UMaine students, faculty, staff, as well as local and state industry and community leaders! 
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Monday, April 24 • 9:15am - 10:30am
Oral Presentations – Social Sciences

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Speakers
AS

Anne St. Amand

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Spatial and spectral analysis of a buried archaeological site on the North Coast of Peru: implications for climate change and human adaptation | | El Niño, a complex climatic phenomenon, has shaped both the environment and human behavior on the North Coast of Peru for thousands of years. While much research has been done, there are still questions about what drives this event, and how El... Read More →
NG

Nicole Gayer

Forest Resources, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Linking labor supply and demand in Maine’s forest industry: An assessment of workforce needs and readiness in an industry in transition | | Major changes in the forest products industry in the state of Maine coupled with an aging | and declining population has created an industry in transition. In order to improve and support | the forest products industry and programs that educate and train workers, an educational | assessment will be conducted. As the labor workforce in Maine continues to age, the need to | understand motivations and preferences of young workers is critical to the survival of the Maine | economy of which the forest products industry occupies a large portion. An assessment of the | forest product labor supply (workers) and demand (employers) in the state of Maine will be | conducted in early 2017. Based on questionnaire results using a snowball sampling strategy a | gap analysis will be utilized to determine if there is a match or mismatch of skills, work culture, | and location among current forestry students, recent graduates/early career professionals, and | employers. By identifying skill mismatches, educational needs, and young worker human capital | investments, the forest products industry and educational programs in Maine can adapt to | transitions occurring in the market. | | Faculty Mentor: Mindy... Read More →
AG

Aeleah Granger

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Muslim and Arab Prejudice: Understanding Emotions | | A socio-functional approach to prejudice posits that different out-groups are perceived to pose different types of threats (e.g., physical safety/security, economic, moral, etc.), which elicit different emotional responses from in-group members. Muslims and Arabs in the United States face a great deal of prejudice in their day to day lives, but are underrepresented in the existing literature. Although Arab and Muslim groups are independent, it appears they are often conflated and confused. This research investigates the different types of threats that each of four groups, African Americans, Atheists, Arabs, and Muslims, are perceived to pose. Emotions toward each out-group were measured as well as individual difference characteristics, such as social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and religious fundamentalism. Findings suggest that there is little emotional distinction in reactions toward Muslims and Arabs and indicate that Muslims and Arabs may be perceived as both symbolic and realistic threats. This exploratory research will help create a better understanding the nature of prejudice toward Muslims and Arabs with hopes for reducing the negative emotions elicited by these minority groups. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
CH

Carter Hathaway

Journalism, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Studying shellfish harvest: Engaged digital media research with Clam Cam | | Clam Cam is a literal lens into the worlds of clam harvesters. Designed to package the experiences of clammers into video episodes, Clam Cam uses GoPro cameras strapped to harvesters’ chests to repli... Read More →
AI

Angelina Iannazzi

Psychology, Neuroscience minor, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Longitudinal Imagined Interactions Between Christians and Atheists | | Social contact has been found to reduce bias and stereotypes between groups of people who have differing religions or races. However, contact is not always possible due to location or lack of motivation for interaction between groups. A new social technique called imagined interactions has individuals imagine a social situation where they interact with a person who is a member of a group that is associated with negative stigma. This intervention has been found to improve intergroup attitudes in a similar way to actual intergroup contact. In this study, Christians and Atheists were selected to imagine interactions with one another four times, one time, or none at all. When they did not imagine interacting with one another they imagined interacting with a stranger. Despite previous positive results, it was found that both Christians and Atheists had more negative intergroup attitudes towards one another the more they interacted with one another. Atheists were found to also have more anxiety towards Christians as well after imagining multiple interactions with them. These results will be discussed in the context of how differences in attitudes can create more negative relations between groups with contact. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
SL

Sara Lowden

Anthropology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ecuador's misappropriation of "buen vivir" This paper examines the epistemological tension surrounding the concept of "buen vivir" and its implications for the governance of natural resources in Ecuador. Rooted in Andean cosmology, "buen vivir" is an emergent philosophy akin to the degrowth movement that addresses the societal and ecological limitations of modern capitalism. This discourse analysis uses the lens of political ecology to investigate Ecuadorian President, Rafael Correa, and his political party's attempt to manipulate and institutionalize "buen vivir" in order to advocate industrial mineral extraction in concordance with the hegemonic extractivist model common throughout Latin America (Kauffman 2014). The analysis studies how Ecuador's constitution promotes responsible mining that respects the "rights of Nature" while in effect aggravating uneven social relations and increasing instability within mining zones (Vanhulst 2014). Interviews conducted in March 2016 in Zamora Province, a rural region near the southeastern border of Peru, reveal growing community opposition to large scale extraction of subsurface mining and document a failure to involve local stakeholders in participatory processes concerning extraction. Such exclusionary processes violate the central pillars of buen vivir and serve to reproduce the dominant growth discourse. References Kauffman, Craig M., and Pamela L. Martin 2014 Scaling Up Buen Vivir: Globalizing Local Environmental Governance from Ecuador. Global Environmental Politics 14(1):40-58. Vanhulst, Julien, and Adrian E. Beling 2014 Buen Vivir: Emergent Discourse within Or Beyond Sustainable Development? Ecological Economics 101:54-63. | | Faculty Mentor: Christine... Read More →
MM

Molly Masters

English, political science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Major Classism: Intertextual Binaries Among CLAS and STEM Ideologies | | This project is constructed around three presenters’ semester-long ethnographic research studies on the development of STEM writers’ identities and overcoming classism specific to academic disciplines. Our research is purposed for filling the discourse gap regarding STEM students as writers. Our results constitute a discursive exchange regarding STEM-directed tutoring strategies among writing center tutors and professionals in which we consider... Read More →
DM

Daniel Mistro

Resource Economics & Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Window Inserts and the Communities Adopting Them | | Weatherizing homes for the winter has become a common practice in the state of Maine as many residential homes are fitted with older, single-pane windows which are inefficient for keeping heat inside. There is a growing trend of community built window inserts in the state, with over 15 communities participating in 2016 projects. Through this volunteer led program, full-priced inserts are provided at an affordable cost (around $2.07 per square foot) that is roughly ten-times cheaper than comparable products sold by commercial companies. The lowest income members of the community, those that would benefit the most, can receive a subsidized rate with inserts priced at $1 each. While these projects are currently limited to Maine, this model could be reasonably replicated in other states. Using our own model for heat loss evaluation, we estimate that these window inserts can reduce heat loss through the window by up to 40% and have a payback period of less than one heating season in some cases. We also conducted three rounds of surveys aimed to observe the social impacts and changes in reported behavior associated with adopting these inserts. These include reducing the energy efficiency gap, improving comfort, acting as a potential gateway behavior, and showing potential signs for a rebound effect. We also studied why people chose to participate in the program, while observing a 99% overall satisfaction rate among those who did. | | Faculty Mentor: Sharon... Read More →
AO

Anna Olsen

International Affairs with a concentration in culture, conflict and globalization, minors in archaeology, biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ottoman Archaeology at Nadin-Gradina, Croatia, 2016 The Ottoman era remains an under-explored component of Mediterranean archaeology, despite its place as one of the great world empires. This era of history, however, is the key to linking prehistory to the modern landscape. The study of the Ottoman Empire and its various conquests from an archaeological perspective holds the potential to seamlessly unite the ancient and the modern, to form an elegant and comprehensible continuity of the human story, and in this case, as it pertains to the Mediterranean. In the eastern Adriatic region of Croatia, the archaeological record of the Nadina-Gradina site reflects a vast array of cultural identities over the past 3,000 years, from Liburnian Iron Age to Roman, to Medieval and Ottoman. Here, the Ottoman period links the ancient world to the modern, presenting an opportunity to investigate this long continuum of human experience. In the summer of 2016, the Nadin-Gradina archaeological project focused in part on this Ottoman component. In an effort to understand the extent to which the Ottoman Empire impacted people, land, and livelihood in this area, the project began to map and excavate structures from this era of occupation. Efforts focused on a monumental a fortress shrouded in trees and a smaller structure interpreted to have been a mosque. These structures were documented using high resolution photographs from a drone-mounted camera and processed using Agisoft Photoscan software to create accurate digital 3D models. When combined with 2015 findings, the results shed light on this latest occupational phase at Nadin-Gradina and provide a cost-effective and efficient manner to field document and map the archaeological record. | | Faculty Mentor: Gregory... Read More →
AR

Amelia Reinhardt

Secondary Education, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Misinterpreting English: Inclusive Tutoring Practices in the Writing Center | | Our interactive presentation details the sociocultural understanding sought in collaborative writing. We examine tutoring paradigms (current traditional rhetoric, expressivism, and social constructionism) that can be utilized to promote inclusive practices in the writing center. We aim to facilitate understanding surrounding the application of these three paradigms, the acknowledgement of nonstandard forms of English, and the interdisciplinary boundaries of tutor-tutee relationships. Through our ethnographic research, we hope to influence safe spaces that support all... Read More →
avatar for James Robe

James Robe

Mass Communication, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Fostering Scientific Discourse on the Internet: Scientific information and data have become more readily available to populations that may not have had easy access to science content prior to increases in internet use and availability. Website creation platforms continue to be democratized by efforts to limit the amount of knowledge and money needed to launch, operate, and maintain websites. The internet also allows scientists to communicate with publics in more meaningful ways beyond education, such as scientific discourse. The opportunities that accompany expanded internet and website capabilities creates need for a comprehensive guide to help scientists or scientific groups take advantage of the... Read More →
MR

Malik Robinson

Philosophy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Overlapping Otherness: A Phenomenological Approach to Black Sexuality | | The American Black community exhibits abnormally intense homophobia towards its own members. By examining “the lived experience of the Black man” through the phenomenological lens of Jean-Paul Sartre, Frantz Fanon was able to make notable progress in understanding what parts of experience influence the identity of a Black man. I propose to continue applying this lens to understand this phenomenon of culturally augmented homophobia. Sartre posited that the Other wields the powerful force of the human gaze... Read More →
BS

Ben Scuderi

Resource Economics and Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
An Examination of Production Effiency in New England's Oyster Aquaculture Industry | | Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread practice in New England, but few economic studies have focused on this industry. Several different production methods are currently employed in this region to raise oysters, each of which involves a different level of capital and labor intensity. This analysis seeks to determine whether there are significant differences in productivity resulting from employing these different oyster production methods. | | We employed a mixed-mode survey format to collect information from oyster growers. Respondents were given the option to complete our survey either online or by mail, and those who participated were compensated for their time with a $20 cash gift. This survey was sent to 530 oyster farms located throughout Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. We sent three rounds of surveys by mail and email, and have received 155 completed surveys, yielding a response rate of over 29%. | | This presentation identifies the factors that significantly contribute to oyster production efficiency. A stochastic frontier production function (SFPF) was estimated to evaluate the productive efficiency of oyster operations. This model allows us to investigate the relative contribution of different productive inputs to the overall productivity of each oyster farm. Additionally, we assess the impact of factors such as location experience, and diversity of species in determining the productive efficiency of each grower. | | This study provides a tool that allows oyster growers to evaluate the efficiency of the production methods they are currently employing. This analysis also has important policy implications. Assessing the relative efficiency of... Read More →
MT

Mackenzie Tefft

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Dyadic Interactions as They Relate to Emotional Adjustment in Adolescents. | | I AM A CUGR FELLOWSHIP AWARDEE. It is mandatory for me to attend, and I was unsure this was needed as well. | I will be completing my project under the guidance of Rebecca Schwartz-Mette Ph.D. in the Peer Relations Lab at the UMaine. Data for my thesis will be obtained through an ongoing project called the Maine Adolescent Peer Project. This study aims to examine emotional adjustment in adolescent friendships... Read More →
AT

Andrew Tomer

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
"They need to get over it": Native American mascot protest leads to social discounting | | There is a current gap in the stigma literature of what leads to prejudice and discrimination against Native Americans (NAs). However, existing literature does inform us about ambivalen... Read More →

Session Chair
AG

Aeleah Granger

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Muslim and Arab Prejudice: Understanding Emotions | | A socio-functional approach to prejudice posits that different out-groups are perceived to pose different types of threats (e.g., physical safety/security, economic, moral, etc.), which elicit different emotional responses from in-group members. Muslims and Arabs in the United States face a great deal of prejudice in their day to day lives, but are underrepresented in the existing literature. Although Arab and Muslim groups are independent, it appears they are often conflated and confused. This research investigates the different types of threats that each of four groups, African Americans, Atheists, Arabs, and Muslims, are perceived to pose. Emotions toward each out-group were measured as well as individual difference characteristics, such as social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and religious fundamentalism. Findings suggest that there is little emotional distinction in reactions toward Muslims and Arabs and indicate that Muslims and Arabs may be perceived as both symbolic and realistic threats. This exploratory research will help create a better understanding the nature of prejudice toward Muslims and Arabs with hopes for reducing the negative emotions elicited by these minority groups. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
AO

Anna Olsen

International Affairs with a concentration in culture, conflict and globalization, minors in archaeology, biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ottoman Archaeology at Nadin-Gradina, Croatia, 2016 The Ottoman era remains an under-explored component of Mediterranean archaeology, despite its place as one of the great world empires. This era of history, however, is the key to linking prehistory to the modern landscape. The study of the Ottoman Empire and its various conquests from an archaeological perspective holds the potential to seamlessly unite the ancient and the modern, to form an elegant and comprehensible continuity of the human story, and in this case, as it pertains to the Mediterranean. In the eastern Adriatic region of Croatia, the archaeological record of the Nadina-Gradina site reflects a vast array of cultural identities over the past 3,000 years, from Liburnian Iron Age to Roman, to Medieval and Ottoman. Here, the Ottoman period links the ancient world to the modern, presenting an opportunity to investigate this long continuum of human experience. In the summer of 2016, the Nadin-Gradina archaeological project focused in part on this Ottoman component. In an effort to understand the extent to which the Ottoman Empire impacted people, land, and livelihood in this area, the project began to map and excavate structures from this era of occupation. Efforts focused on a monumental a fortress shrouded in trees and a smaller structure interpreted to have been a mosque. These structures were documented using high resolution photographs from a drone-mounted camera and processed using Agisoft Photoscan software to create accurate digital 3D models. When combined with 2015 findings, the results shed light on this latest occupational phase at Nadin-Gradina and provide a cost-effective and efficient manner to field document and map the archaeological record. | | Faculty Mentor: Gregory... Read More →
BS

Ben Scuderi

Resource Economics and Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
An Examination of Production Effiency in New England's Oyster Aquaculture Industry | | Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread practice in New England, but few economic studies have focused on this industry. Several different production methods are currently employed in this region to raise oysters, each of which involves a different level of capital and labor intensity. This analysis seeks to determine whether there are significant differences in productivity resulting from employing these different oyster production methods. | | We employed a mixed-mode survey format to collect information from oyster growers. Respondents were given the option to complete our survey either online or by mail, and those who participated were compensated for their time with a $20 cash gift. This survey was sent to 530 oyster farms located throughout Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. We sent three rounds of surveys by mail and email, and have received 155 completed surveys, yielding a response rate of over 29%. | | This presentation identifies the factors that significantly contribute to oyster production efficiency. A stochastic frontier production function (SFPF) was estimated to evaluate the productive efficiency of oyster operations. This model allows us to investigate the relative contribution of different productive inputs to the overall productivity of each oyster farm. Additionally, we assess the impact of factors such as location experience, and diversity of species in determining the productive efficiency of each grower. | | This study provides a tool that allows oyster growers to evaluate the efficiency of the production methods they are currently employing. This analysis also has important policy implications. Assessing the relative efficiency of... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Rooms 1-3

Attendees (1)