Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
Welcome to the 2017 UMaine Student Symposium: Research and Creative Activity electronic event program. This electronic program includes student abstracts, student presentation style descriptions, and presentation schedules. It also includes a map of the venue layout, schedule of the entire day’s events and programs, as well as details and information regarding our sponsors and selected university programs.

We hope you enjoy a full day of student presentations, guest speakers, award ceremonies, and the chance to network with UMaine students, faculty, staff, as well as local and state industry and community leaders! 
View analytic
Monday, April 24 • 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Oral Presentations – Engineering

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

Speakers
avatar for Libby Gorse

Libby Gorse

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantifying aquaculture’s effect on nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface in the Damariscotta estuary in Maine The importance of developing a sustainable aquaculture industry has been realized in the state of Maine. An extensive, interdisciplinary EPSCoR-funded project by the name of SEANET (Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network) is spearheading research on aquaculture from all fronts to reduce the rising pressure placed on wild marine species by the demands of a growing global population. The work presented here involves the determination of the rate at which organic biodeposits resulting from bivalve aquaculture operations can safely be added to the underlying sediment, establishing the carrying capacity of the sediment with respect to aquaculture practice. We have designed flux chambers that hold intact sediment cores immersed in seawater, mimicking environmental conditions for the study of nutrient cycling and flux at the sediment-water interface. Three major hypotheses are tested: (1) biodeposits high in carbon and nitrogen content increase nutrient flux to the water column; (2) fine-grained sediments contain more organic matter and support lower mineralization rates of biodeposits than coarse-grained sediments; and (3) polychaetes lower the efflux of nutrients from the sediment. The Damariscotta estuary has been identified as a critical site to understand due to its suitability for aquaculture. The extrapolation of our data will help future aquaculturists and policy makers to make informed decisions. | | Faculty Mentor: Aria... Read More →
JL

John Larsen

math major, physics minor, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Homotopy Type Theory, Univalent Foundations of Mathematics | | Homotopy type theory (HoTT) is a foundation to mathematics alternative from the standard Zermelo-Frankel set theory with the axiom of choice (ZFC set theory). It stems from ideas in type theory as well ideas in homotopy theory (a branch of topology), and combines the two in its own original way. We will first focus on type theory which, by itself, could also be an alternative to ZFC set theory; and that will prepare us for an introduction to homotopy type theory. Along the way I will show some results from both fields, as well as connections between them and ZFC set theory as I see appropriate. | | Faculty Mentor: George... Read More →
ZL

Zhilong Liu

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantification of Aquaculture Farm Drag Based on the Momentum Sink Method | | The demand of aquaculture will increase in the future, which presents an economic opportunity for farm expansion. In order to ensure sustainable growth for both the industry and the ecosystem, an important consideration is the flow response from larger farms. This work aims to quantify the friction caused by oyster farms using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model predicted the flow response of a case study oyster farm in the Damariscotta River. The simulation provided the flow reduction and turbulence induced by the farm. A drag coefficient was derived based on the momentum sink induced by the oyster farm and will be used in the future to predict the impact of larger farms through theoretical and regional scale numerical model techniques. The outcome of these combined efforts will provide guidance for sustainable farm expansion in the future. | | Faculty Mentor: Kimberly... Read More →
AM

Anin Maskay

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SAW Static Strain Sensor for High Temperature Applications | | The measurement of static strain in harsh environment, in particular at temperatures beyond 100ºC, is highly desirable in multiple applications such as power plants, industrial manufacturing, and aerospace. The aforementioned industries have a high demand for small, robust, stable sensors that can operate wirelessly, without a battery or power source, and require minimal maintenance for structural health monitoring and condition based maintenance. The technologies that currently exist face multiple challenges related to sensor endurance, size, complexity, and system integrability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology is a technology that has shown promise in a multitude of sensing applications because of its characteristics such as small size, ease of mass production, robustness, battery-free, and wireless capability. In this research work, SAW sensors fabricated using thin film fabrication techniques on langasite employing platinum alloy based electrodes have been exposed to temperatures up to... Read More →
CM

Chitra Manjanai Pandian

Electrical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
WATER QUALITY MONITORING AND DATA ANALYSIS USING SOLAR POWERED WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS | | Storm water runoff pollution has been identified as a major environmental and health safety issue worldwide. In order to ensure health safety, water quality monitoring is necessary. Tr... Read More →
avatar for Berkay Payal

Berkay Payal

Electrical Engineering/Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Determining Honey Bee Colony Health Using RF and Radar Techniques Determining Honey Bee Colony Health Using RF and Radar Techniques Berkay Payal Advisor: Nuri W. Emanetoglu Herbert Aumann, Frank Drummond Abstract The sudden disappearance of honey bees, commonly referred to as Colony Collapse Disorder (CDD), is a global problem that threatens agriculture. Honey bees pollinate more than 80% of US agricultural plants. In CCD, worker bees suddenly disappear and do not come back to their hives, leaving behind the queen and immature bees. In order to study bee colony health, a 5.8 GHz radio frequency (RF) instrument was designed, built and used to monitor bee hives, in particular to provide an early warning for CCD. This system was used in reflective (Doppler radar) mode to measure bee activity and to listen to the hive remotely. When pointed to the bee hive entrance, the Doppler shift due to the flight of individual bees could be detected. An interface circuit performing filtering operations along with power management circuit were constructed, tested and integrated in the RF system. After testing the complete setup in the lab, the system was deployed in the field. Both the attenuated and modulated signals were collected using two Arduino Nano development boards and saved to microSD cards. The data collected due to bee activity was processed via MATLAB and the results were compared with visual observations of bee keepers. Radar data showed that flying bees beat their wings between 200 to 250 beats-per-second. A novel audio signature was discovered in the 100 to 150 Hz range, and has been attributed to bees fanning the hive for cooling during the day and heating during the night through visual inspection. | | Faculty Mentor: Nuri... Read More →
MR

Mark Royer

Computer Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A Java class loading extension to support units-of-measurement error detection | | This project investigates dynamic class-loading techniques for | integrating units of measurement in Java. Software errors can manifest | themselves in any programming language due to semantic (or syntactic) | ambiguity. Ignoring information surrounding units can lead to | disastrous failures in computer systems. One notable failure was the | unit conversion mishap that caused the crash of the NASA Mars Climate | Orbiter in 1998. The crash occurred because English measurements were | not converted into the correct metric types. While disturbing (and | calamitous), there are many times in software systems where errors of | this type do not fail in such a spectacular fashion. Instead, what | often occurs is that unit conversion errors are not realized in | mission critical systems for some time. Only after an extended run of | the system, the program will fail with cryptic or no explanation. Or | perhaps even worse, the system will continue to operate with values | that seem correct, but are in fact erroneous. There have been a | number of proposals and projects throughout the years that have | attempted to incorporate units into the Java programming language, but | at this time, measurement units have not been added to the core Java | API. This feasibility study incorporates some of the techniques that | have been implemented by others and investigates units of measurement | class-loading mechanisms. The final result is a library that enhances | measurement unit support in Java applications. | | Faculty Mentor: Sudarshan... Read More →
RZ

Razieh Zangeneh

Mechanical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Design and Construction of a Froude Scaled Model DTMB 5415 Hull Form at University of Maine | | The Marine, Ocean, and Offshore Research Group at the University of Maine, in cooperation with faculty and students from the University of Maine, the University of Southern Maine, Maine Maritime Academy, as well as industry professionals from General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, formed a working group in May of 2016 that was tasked with the design and fabrication of a Froude scaled model DTMB 5415. The primary goals of the project were to foster a working relationship among these partners, as well as develop and construct a model DTMB 5415 to be utilized as a validation case for the implementation of a towing carriage to be installed in the state of the art Alfond W2 Ocean Engineering Lab, located at the Advanced Structures and Composites Center on the University of Maine campus. The DTMB 5415 is a hull form for a naval surface combatant that features the incorporation of both a transom stern and a sonar dome, and is well regarded amongst naval architectural circles. | | Faculty Mentor: Krish... Read More →

Session Chair
avatar for Libby Gorse

Libby Gorse

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantifying aquaculture’s effect on nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface in the Damariscotta estuary in Maine The importance of developing a sustainable aquaculture industry has been realized in the state of Maine. An extensive, interdisciplinary EPSCoR-funded project by the name of SEANET (Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network) is spearheading research on aquaculture from all fronts to reduce the rising pressure placed on wild marine species by the demands of a growing global population. The work presented here involves the determination of the rate at which organic biodeposits resulting from bivalve aquaculture operations can safely be added to the underlying sediment, establishing the carrying capacity of the sediment with respect to aquaculture practice. We have designed flux chambers that hold intact sediment cores immersed in seawater, mimicking environmental conditions for the study of nutrient cycling and flux at the sediment-water interface. Three major hypotheses are tested: (1) biodeposits high in carbon and nitrogen content increase nutrient flux to the water column; (2) fine-grained sediments contain more organic matter and support lower mineralization rates of biodeposits than coarse-grained sediments; and (3) polychaetes lower the efflux of nutrients from the sediment. The Damariscotta estuary has been identified as a critical site to understand due to its suitability for aquaculture. The extrapolation of our data will help future aquaculturists and policy makers to make informed decisions. | | Faculty Mentor: Aria... Read More →
AM

Anin Maskay

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SAW Static Strain Sensor for High Temperature Applications | | The measurement of static strain in harsh environment, in particular at temperatures beyond 100ºC, is highly desirable in multiple applications such as power plants, industrial manufacturing, and aerospace. The aforementioned industries have a high demand for small, robust, stable sensors that can operate wirelessly, without a battery or power source, and require minimal maintenance for structural health monitoring and condition based maintenance. The technologies that currently exist face multiple challenges related to sensor endurance, size, complexity, and system integrability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology is a technology that has shown promise in a multitude of sensing applications because of its characteristics such as small size, ease of mass production, robustness, battery-free, and wireless capability. In this research work, SAW sensors fabricated using thin film fabrication techniques on langasite employing platinum alloy based electrodes have been exposed to temperatures up to... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Rooms 5-6

Attendees (2)