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Welcome to the 2017 UMaine Student Symposium: Research and Creative Activity electronic event program. This electronic program includes student abstracts, student presentation style descriptions, and presentation schedules. It also includes a map of the venue layout, schedule of the entire day’s events and programs, as well as details and information regarding our sponsors and selected university programs.

We hope you enjoy a full day of student presentations, guest speakers, award ceremonies, and the chance to network with UMaine students, faculty, staff, as well as local and state industry and community leaders! 
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Monday, April 24
 

8:00am

Poster Setup/ Registration
Monday April 24, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom

9:00am

Opening Ceremony
Monday April 24, 2017 9:00am - 9:15am
Ballroom

9:15am

Exhibits/Performances – Education
Speakers
CA

Courtney Angelosante

PhD in Education, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Wheels on the Bus: Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports on the School Bus | | Many students spend a significant amount of each day on a school bus. Ensuring this environment is safe, orderly, and positive is critical to the start and end of a successful school day. Bus drivers have a difficult job; a high level of responsibility in a complex and dynamic environment with limited student supervision. These challenges are often exacerbated by the limited amount of behavioral training provided to drivers. Incorporating PBIS on the bus expands the teaching and strengthening of schoolwide behavioral expectations to an environment that is frequently cited for the behavioral challenges it presents. The manner in which travel by school bus bookends each day and the inherent challenges of providing adequate supervision and positive feedback, it is clearly evident that special consideration regarding behavioral programing is critical. This presentation demonstrates that PBIS can be implemented with fidelity on a school bus. Further, PBIS on the bus can lead to social/behavioral growth and positive outcomes students and improved job satisfaction for bus drivers. | | The methods of prevention and intervention used in this study are based on ecological and applied behavioral theories. Direct observation and qualitative data will be used to illustrated program outcomes. Primary intervention components to be addressed in this presentation include... Read More →
avatar for Jason Dignan

Jason Dignan

New Media, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM
Stewart Motion Platform Redesign (Table 15 Side R, 10:45 AM-12:00PM) | | The University of Maine Virtual Environment and Multimodal Interaction Laboratory (VEMI Lab) houses a currently offline Stewart Motion Platform (SMP). The SMP is a synergistic parallel robot with six axes of movement. The platform is controlled with an Arduino Mega, which in turn is controlled by a PC computer using Python script and a Joystick. Repeated operating system updates over time have rendered the joystick drivers unusable, which in turn have affected the Python script. The proposed project consists in migrating the hardware to a new, durable format, involving reassembly of the control interfaces, and reprogramming. The setup will be reverse engineered and reassembled using 3D printing technologies, forming single-piece, solid, hardwired connections requiring no further modifications to conform to changing standards in computers. Specifically, platform-to-Arduino connections will be replaced with Cat5 cabling and connectors. Thereafter, Python scripted software will be redeveloped using Unity as a control system for the platform. Unity is a mainstream game development engine also used in research with the capacity to render real-time physics, making it highly useful in simulations. Additionally, Unity can interface with an Arduino using Serial Communications, making it an ideal environment for controlling the SMP. The restored platform will inform research design for current and future VEMI projects involving aging and spatial cognition, again and driving, gerontechnology, and the study of multi-level 2D and 3D cognitive maps and aspects of human-computer interaction. | | Project Haggis (Table 23 Side L, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | While peers may be invited to provide in-class verbal feedback or critique of student work, formal evaluation of student projects in traditional teacher-centric classrooms is usually reserved to the class instructor. Project Haggis proposes a technological mechanism for expanding formal feedback to include student-peer evaluations, providing quality, timely feedback while involving an entire class in the process of evaluating group projects and individual performance. Haggis offers a web-based service making peer feedback accessible in real time as evaluations are completed. Using an SQL database system and web browser, Haggis is a content management system in which data is captured, stored, and made visually available through built-in and user-formulated queries. APIs let students submit on-site evaluations of project work via smartphone. Students will be required to log on via web-browser to view compiled results and to submit individual performance evaluations. The pilot program will be applied to multiple project assignments within a single Spring 2017 course being offered at University of Maine. The underlying system is generically designed to support any number of courses and assignments within courses. The system could likewise be deployed to increase interactivity of an audience and with producers of materials, e.g. at science fairs or art shows, or with business/organization project teams. The... Read More →
avatar for Colleen Dougherty

Colleen Dougherty

Student Development in Higher Education, 9:15AM-10:30AM
“University of Maine • 11/10/16” | | In the days following the 2016 presidential election, tensions and emotions ran high across the country, and no place is more fit for a discussion on political discourse than a college campus. In a photoessay entitled “University of Maine &bull... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Ballroom

9:15am

Exhibits/Performances – Natural Sciences
Speakers
ZA

Zachary Applebee

Chemical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Analysis of Brown Seaweed Nutrient Uptake and Capacity | | River pollution has become a widespread problem in recent years. This pollution comes in many forms, but one form is excess nutrients in the water. This nutrient pollution often includes common elements like nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus that could potentially be absorbed by algae such as various types of seaweed. The University of New England have the problem that there are some factories upstream from their campus and nutrients have been building up in the river over time. They desired a way to remove these excess nutrients and came up with the idea of growing seaweed to take in the nutrients and thus clean up the river. The problem they had was that they wanted to grow the seaweed but they... Read More →
BB

Benjamin Becker

Zoology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Territorial Behavior In Song Sparrows Influenced By Human Development | | For many indigenous animal species, human development has drastically altered their native habitats through destruction of their environments, food sources or natural cover. For many, this change in environment has proven to be too much to cope with, and cannot adapt quickly enough to an urban lifestyle so drastically different from their intrinsic habitat. However, for some species, behavioral and morphological changes have allowed them to mold into a new human environment, and find life within cities and towns survivable. | One such species is the Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia), which through possessing the unique quality of both individuals living in urban environments and in wild environments, makes it a subject of intrigue on the effects of urbanization on the behavior of individuals. This behavior difference was tested by comparing aggressive response in male individuals through a perceived rival threat into their breeding territories; the perceived threat was produced by using a prerecorded song sparrow song, played from a speaker hung in a tree within their marked territory. Time spent investigating the source of the song was recorded, proximity and activity near the source, as well as attempts to out-sing or challenge the perceived rival were also recorded. This procedure was repeated with individual males inhabiting wild, natural environments as well as those inhabiting urban, developed habitats. | Males within close proximity to human structures were found to exhibit more aggressive behavioral responses, determined by longer attempts to out-sing the rival, and a higher degree of activity near the source of the song. Generally, males in natural environments measured less in these subjects. | | Faculty Mentor: Brian... Read More →
GC

Grace Chavis

Animal and Veterinary Science, Pre-Veterinary Concentration, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The Eastern Coyote: The Missing Link? | | Sylvatic (genotype 8; G8) Echinococcus granulosus (EG) was recently identified as lung cysts in Maine moose, which can act as an intermediate host for this cestode parasite. The definitive host, in which the adult cestode reproduces, is most commonly the wolf. Since wolves are not thought to be present in Maine, a more likely definitive host is the Eastern Coyote, due to its large size, diverse diet, and the fact that it predates upon large game (i.e. deer, moose). With the assistance of Maine IFW, enteric tracts of coyotes (n= 28) trapped or hunted in the Northern Wildlife management districts in Maine were collected by legally sanctioned hunters and trappers for testing. Tracts were frozen for 14 days at -80⁰C to inactivate tapeworm ova. Thawed tracts were sectioned, immersed in water, and the mucosa was scraped. The water was then filtered with 850... Read More →
CH

Corey Halliday

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
RNAseq Analysis Reveals Effects of Arsenic on Neuronal and Immune Gene Expression in Danio rerio | | Arsenic in drinking water has been linked to developmental issues in utero, resulting in a decrease in IQ. Maine wells contain, on average, 23 ppb arsenic, which is higher tha... Read More →
KL

Katrina Lapham

Communication Sciences & Disorders, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cerebral Palsy and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Important Components and Considerations for AAC Implementation (Table 26 Side L, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Cerebral palsy is often associated with expressive language deficits, and many children with cerebral palsy require... Read More →
SM

Stephen Moore

Oceanography, 9:15AM-10:30AM
A Model Study of the Saco and Casco Bays in Response to Winter Storms | | As part of an ongoing effort to develop a hydrodynamic model of the Saco and Casco bays, this study aims to simulate physical responses of the bays to winter storms. The model has been built based on th... Read More →
HN

Han Nguyen

Chemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Cellulose – based hydrogel for marine anti – biofouling applications | | A novel hydrogel based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was developed to serve as a marine anti-biofouling coating. The synthesis of this hydrogel involves reacting a thiol-functionalized CMC (cysCMC) with a norbornene-functionalized CMC (cCMC) through a thiol-ene reaction. CMC hydrogels are promising materials for anti-biofouling because the hydrolytic degradation of the ester linkages within the cCMC moities implies that cysCMC-cCMC hydrogel can degrade in sea water to generate a new surface. A series of hydrogels was made by varying the compositions of both cysCMC and cCMC molecules. The developed hydrogels demonstrated a wide range of mechanical properties. Results showed that ~60 Pa to ~10,000 Pa 1-3 wt% hydrogels could be obtained by simply changing the mass ratio of cysCMC to cCMC. Degradation study showed that less than 10% of the developed hydrogels degraded over a period of one month. Hydrogel-adhered glass coverslips are currently used to assess... Read More →
HS

Hannah Stefl

Human nutrition and dietetics, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Exploring the Nutritional Value of Carrots and Determining Attributes that are Favored by Consumers Hannah Stefl, Barbara Cole, PhD, Department of Chemistry, Melissa Chisholm PhD, Department of Chemistry, Angela Myracle, MPH, PhD Abstract: Carrots, the most popular vegetable of the Apiaceae family, are one of the most widely consumed vegetables due to their characteristic flavor, health benefits, and major source of pro-vitamin A. Carrots come in many different varieties and colors, each having their own distinct aroma, contents of volatiles and nutritional compounds. Each of these components influence the taste or eating quality of the carrot. Breeding of new carrot types has shifted from higher yields and disease resistance to desirable traits of nutrient content, sweetness, low harshness, and succulent texture. Studies have found that consumers value the nutrient content and the overall taste. By looking at the chemistry flavor profile, better recommendations can be offered to growers to help them grow carrots that are well-liked by consumers. The different carrot varieties in this study were tested for pH... Read More →
avatar for Lukas Wotton

Lukas Wotton

Biology, chemistry minor, anthropology minor, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Contrasting fire histories from coastal and inland Maine, U.S.A, since deglaciation Two statewide fires in 1825 and 1947, combined to burn millions of acres across Maine, mediating extensive vegetation changes at locations such as Acadia National Park. Little is known about fire-climate-vegetation interactions in pre-European Maine, largely because of historically infrequent wildfires. Concerns about future warming means there is an urgent need to fill this gap in our knowledge. We used... Read More →

Judges
SB

Shawn Brackett

Engineering Physics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Integrated Environment & Proximity Sensing for UAV Applications | | As the realm of drone applications expand new methods for sensing, navigating and avoiding obstacles need to be developed. The project applies an Extended Kalman Filter to a simulated quadcopter vehicle though Matlab in order to estimate not only the vehicle state but the world state around the vehicle. The EKF takes in multiple sensor readings from range sensors, IMU sensors, and radiation sensors and combines this information to optimize state estimates. The result is an estimated world map to be used in vehicle navigation and obstacle avoidance. | The simulation handles the physics behind the vehicle flight. We know as a result of the motors there will be two primary forces acting on the vehicle, thrust and drag. These forces provide linear and rotational accelerations. These values can be integrated to determine vehicle flight path. This process determines the actual values of the vehicle state. Coupled into the integration process is the ability to tweak how fast the motors spin. Using this, A controller is built in to the vehicle such that desired vehicle states (position, velocity, and orientation) can be achieved. Additionally, sensing methods are simulated following known detection procedures and statistics to provide as accurate sensing models as possible. | The Extended Kalman Filter is used here due to some non-linear components of the estimation model. The estimation model includes the states for the vehicle, nearby world objects, nearby radiation measurements. By combining IMU and GPS data with additional measurement data for an EKF, an estimation method attempts to combine all three... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Ballroom

9:15am

Oral Presentations – Physical Sciences
Speakers
avatar for Samuel Borer

Samuel Borer

Physics and Mathematics, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers for Neutrino Physics When particle physicists want to study the fundamental particles of the universe, they cannot flip through a catalog to find the scientific instrument perfect for the task. They must develop their own tools and, rigorously test and improve upon their design. Scientific exploration can often be shunted by the quality of your instrument. Never is this more prevalent than our probe of neutrinos. Exclusively interacting with the weak force, peculiarly oscillating between its three... Read More →
MH

Muhammad Hossen

Chemistry, Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Dry & Wet Stiffness Increase and Structure Stabilization of Cellulose Nanofibrils (CNF) Aerogels in Aqueous Environment (Room 4 Presenter 3, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Porous cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) based aerogels are capable of absorbing and storing a significant amount of liquid inside the 3D structure. As the porosity of the CNF aerogels goes higher, the amount of liquid absorption increases linearly. One of the biggest problems of 3D CNF aerogels with high porosity is that the structure breaks down very rapidly in aqueous environments. Here we describe a method to overcome this deficiency by adding methacrylate functionalized carboxymethyl cellulose (MetCMC) into the CNF system followed by crosslinking between the methacrylate groups of MetCMC. The resultant polymer composite matrix successfully maintains a robust 3D structure without collapsing when rewetted and stored in aqueous environments. When rewetted CNF-MetCMC composite is freeze dried it maintains its size and shape whereas air drying causes shrinkage of the volume. Air dried CNF-MetCMC swells and increases in volume to some extent when rewetted. A greater mass fraction of CNF in the whole composition stabilizes the air dried structure against swelling in an aqueous environment. Cross-linking between methacrylate groups enhances the dry and wet modulus of CNF-MetCMC aerogels | | Co-authors: Alexander Lafrance, Matthew Talbot, Michael D Mason | | Measurement of Porosity of CNF Aerogels Using Silicone Oil (Section A Poster 27, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Freeze drying of aqueous slurries of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with different wt% of water generates CNF aerogels with different porosities. Measurement of CNF... Read More →
CK

Courtney King

Earth and Climate Sciences, 9:15AM-10:30AM
A climate history: Using glacial geologic landforms to understand past behavior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet | | During the last glacial period, the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) expanded across what today is the Ross Sea. This grounded Ross Sea Ice Sheet (RSIS) caused inflowing outlet glaciers from East Antarctica to thicken and expand into formerly ice-free valleys of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Located between the East Antarctic plateau and the Ross Embayment, the TAM provide an ideal setting to study the fluctuation history of the former RSIS. This region affords insight into the history of past expanded ice, as well as on potential future behavior of the AIS. To study the past behavior, I mapped the glacial geomorphology and dated samples of ancient algae from relict ice-dammed ponds along a transect from the last glacial maximum position to the present-day glacier. A radiocarbon chronology from Lake Wellman valley, adjacent to lower Hatherton Glacier, indicates the maximum position was achieved 9500 yr BP, with subsequent gradual and continuous thinning until ~2000 yr BP. This delayed maximum is likely due to increased snow accumulation over the polar plateau during the global deglaciation (~19,000-11,000 yr BP). These data, along with precisely constructed chronologies from other outlet glacier systems, may be input into geophysical models to predict the future behavior of the AIS. | | Faculty Mentor: Brenda... Read More →

Session Chair
MH

Muhammad Hossen

Chemistry, Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Dry & Wet Stiffness Increase and Structure Stabilization of Cellulose Nanofibrils (CNF) Aerogels in Aqueous Environment (Room 4 Presenter 3, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Porous cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) based aerogels are capable of absorbing and storing a significant amount of liquid inside the 3D structure. As the porosity of the CNF aerogels goes higher, the amount of liquid absorption increases linearly. One of the biggest problems of 3D CNF aerogels with high porosity is that the structure breaks down very rapidly in aqueous environments. Here we describe a method to overcome this deficiency by adding methacrylate functionalized carboxymethyl cellulose (MetCMC) into the CNF system followed by crosslinking between the methacrylate groups of MetCMC. The resultant polymer composite matrix successfully maintains a robust 3D structure without collapsing when rewetted and stored in aqueous environments. When rewetted CNF-MetCMC composite is freeze dried it maintains its size and shape whereas air drying causes shrinkage of the volume. Air dried CNF-MetCMC swells and increases in volume to some extent when rewetted. A greater mass fraction of CNF in the whole composition stabilizes the air dried structure against swelling in an aqueous environment. Cross-linking between methacrylate groups enhances the dry and wet modulus of CNF-MetCMC aerogels | | Co-authors: Alexander Lafrance, Matthew Talbot, Michael D Mason | | Measurement of Porosity of CNF Aerogels Using Silicone Oil (Section A Poster 27, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Freeze drying of aqueous slurries of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with different wt% of water generates CNF aerogels with different porosities. Measurement of CNF... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Room 4

9:15am

Oral Presentations – Social Sciences
Speakers
AS

Anne St. Amand

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Spatial and spectral analysis of a buried archaeological site on the North Coast of Peru: implications for climate change and human adaptation | | El Niño, a complex climatic phenomenon, has shaped both the environment and human behavior on the North Coast of Peru for thousands of years. While much research has been done, there are still questions about what drives this event, and how El... Read More →
NG

Nicole Gayer

Forest Resources, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Linking labor supply and demand in Maine’s forest industry: An assessment of workforce needs and readiness in an industry in transition | | Major changes in the forest products industry in the state of Maine coupled with an aging | and declining population has created an industry in transition. In order to improve and support | the forest products industry and programs that educate and train workers, an educational | assessment will be conducted. As the labor workforce in Maine continues to age, the need to | understand motivations and preferences of young workers is critical to the survival of the Maine | economy of which the forest products industry occupies a large portion. An assessment of the | forest product labor supply (workers) and demand (employers) in the state of Maine will be | conducted in early 2017. Based on questionnaire results using a snowball sampling strategy a | gap analysis will be utilized to determine if there is a match or mismatch of skills, work culture, | and location among current forestry students, recent graduates/early career professionals, and | employers. By identifying skill mismatches, educational needs, and young worker human capital | investments, the forest products industry and educational programs in Maine can adapt to | transitions occurring in the market. | | Faculty Mentor: Mindy... Read More →
AG

Aeleah Granger

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Muslim and Arab Prejudice: Understanding Emotions | | A socio-functional approach to prejudice posits that different out-groups are perceived to pose different types of threats (e.g., physical safety/security, economic, moral, etc.), which elicit different emotional responses from in-group members. Muslims and Arabs in the United States face a great deal of prejudice in their day to day lives, but are underrepresented in the existing literature. Although Arab and Muslim groups are independent, it appears they are often conflated and confused. This research investigates the different types of threats that each of four groups, African Americans, Atheists, Arabs, and Muslims, are perceived to pose. Emotions toward each out-group were measured as well as individual difference characteristics, such as social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and religious fundamentalism. Findings suggest that there is little emotional distinction in reactions toward Muslims and Arabs and indicate that Muslims and Arabs may be perceived as both symbolic and realistic threats. This exploratory research will help create a better understanding the nature of prejudice toward Muslims and Arabs with hopes for reducing the negative emotions elicited by these minority groups. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
CH

Carter Hathaway

Journalism, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Studying shellfish harvest: Engaged digital media research with Clam Cam | | Clam Cam is a literal lens into the worlds of clam harvesters. Designed to package the experiences of clammers into video episodes, Clam Cam uses GoPro cameras strapped to harvesters’ chests to repli... Read More →
AI

Angelina Iannazzi

Psychology, Neuroscience minor, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Longitudinal Imagined Interactions Between Christians and Atheists | | Social contact has been found to reduce bias and stereotypes between groups of people who have differing religions or races. However, contact is not always possible due to location or lack of motivation for interaction between groups. A new social technique called imagined interactions has individuals imagine a social situation where they interact with a person who is a member of a group that is associated with negative stigma. This intervention has been found to improve intergroup attitudes in a similar way to actual intergroup contact. In this study, Christians and Atheists were selected to imagine interactions with one another four times, one time, or none at all. When they did not imagine interacting with one another they imagined interacting with a stranger. Despite previous positive results, it was found that both Christians and Atheists had more negative intergroup attitudes towards one another the more they interacted with one another. Atheists were found to also have more anxiety towards Christians as well after imagining multiple interactions with them. These results will be discussed in the context of how differences in attitudes can create more negative relations between groups with contact. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
SL

Sara Lowden

Anthropology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ecuador's misappropriation of "buen vivir" This paper examines the epistemological tension surrounding the concept of "buen vivir" and its implications for the governance of natural resources in Ecuador. Rooted in Andean cosmology, "buen vivir" is an emergent philosophy akin to the degrowth movement that addresses the societal and ecological limitations of modern capitalism. This discourse analysis uses the lens of political ecology to investigate Ecuadorian President, Rafael Correa, and his political party's attempt to manipulate and institutionalize "buen vivir" in order to advocate industrial mineral extraction in concordance with the hegemonic extractivist model common throughout Latin America (Kauffman 2014). The analysis studies how Ecuador's constitution promotes responsible mining that respects the "rights of Nature" while in effect aggravating uneven social relations and increasing instability within mining zones (Vanhulst 2014). Interviews conducted in March 2016 in Zamora Province, a rural region near the southeastern border of Peru, reveal growing community opposition to large scale extraction of subsurface mining and document a failure to involve local stakeholders in participatory processes concerning extraction. Such exclusionary processes violate the central pillars of buen vivir and serve to reproduce the dominant growth discourse. References Kauffman, Craig M., and Pamela L. Martin 2014 Scaling Up Buen Vivir: Globalizing Local Environmental Governance from Ecuador. Global Environmental Politics 14(1):40-58. Vanhulst, Julien, and Adrian E. Beling 2014 Buen Vivir: Emergent Discourse within Or Beyond Sustainable Development? Ecological Economics 101:54-63. | | Faculty Mentor: Christine... Read More →
MM

Molly Masters

English, political science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Major Classism: Intertextual Binaries Among CLAS and STEM Ideologies | | This project is constructed around three presenters’ semester-long ethnographic research studies on the development of STEM writers’ identities and overcoming classism specific to academic disciplines. Our research is purposed for filling the discourse gap regarding STEM students as writers. Our results constitute a discursive exchange regarding STEM-directed tutoring strategies among writing center tutors and professionals in which we consider... Read More →
DM

Daniel Mistro

Resource Economics & Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Window Inserts and the Communities Adopting Them | | Weatherizing homes for the winter has become a common practice in the state of Maine as many residential homes are fitted with older, single-pane windows which are inefficient for keeping heat inside. There is a growing trend of community built window inserts in the state, with over 15 communities participating in 2016 projects. Through this volunteer led program, full-priced inserts are provided at an affordable cost (around $2.07 per square foot) that is roughly ten-times cheaper than comparable products sold by commercial companies. The lowest income members of the community, those that would benefit the most, can receive a subsidized rate with inserts priced at $1 each. While these projects are currently limited to Maine, this model could be reasonably replicated in other states. Using our own model for heat loss evaluation, we estimate that these window inserts can reduce heat loss through the window by up to 40% and have a payback period of less than one heating season in some cases. We also conducted three rounds of surveys aimed to observe the social impacts and changes in reported behavior associated with adopting these inserts. These include reducing the energy efficiency gap, improving comfort, acting as a potential gateway behavior, and showing potential signs for a rebound effect. We also studied why people chose to participate in the program, while observing a 99% overall satisfaction rate among those who did. | | Faculty Mentor: Sharon... Read More →
AO

Anna Olsen

International Affairs with a concentration in culture, conflict and globalization, minors in archaeology, biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ottoman Archaeology at Nadin-Gradina, Croatia, 2016 The Ottoman era remains an under-explored component of Mediterranean archaeology, despite its place as one of the great world empires. This era of history, however, is the key to linking prehistory to the modern landscape. The study of the Ottoman Empire and its various conquests from an archaeological perspective holds the potential to seamlessly unite the ancient and the modern, to form an elegant and comprehensible continuity of the human story, and in this case, as it pertains to the Mediterranean. In the eastern Adriatic region of Croatia, the archaeological record of the Nadina-Gradina site reflects a vast array of cultural identities over the past 3,000 years, from Liburnian Iron Age to Roman, to Medieval and Ottoman. Here, the Ottoman period links the ancient world to the modern, presenting an opportunity to investigate this long continuum of human experience. In the summer of 2016, the Nadin-Gradina archaeological project focused in part on this Ottoman component. In an effort to understand the extent to which the Ottoman Empire impacted people, land, and livelihood in this area, the project began to map and excavate structures from this era of occupation. Efforts focused on a monumental a fortress shrouded in trees and a smaller structure interpreted to have been a mosque. These structures were documented using high resolution photographs from a drone-mounted camera and processed using Agisoft Photoscan software to create accurate digital 3D models. When combined with 2015 findings, the results shed light on this latest occupational phase at Nadin-Gradina and provide a cost-effective and efficient manner to field document and map the archaeological record. | | Faculty Mentor: Gregory... Read More →
AR

Amelia Reinhardt

Secondary Education, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Misinterpreting English: Inclusive Tutoring Practices in the Writing Center | | Our interactive presentation details the sociocultural understanding sought in collaborative writing. We examine tutoring paradigms (current traditional rhetoric, expressivism, and social constructionism) that can be utilized to promote inclusive practices in the writing center. We aim to facilitate understanding surrounding the application of these three paradigms, the acknowledgement of nonstandard forms of English, and the interdisciplinary boundaries of tutor-tutee relationships. Through our ethnographic research, we hope to influence safe spaces that support all... Read More →
avatar for James Robe

James Robe

Mass Communication, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Fostering Scientific Discourse on the Internet: Scientific information and data have become more readily available to populations that may not have had easy access to science content prior to increases in internet use and availability. Website creation platforms continue to be democratized by efforts to limit the amount of knowledge and money needed to launch, operate, and maintain websites. The internet also allows scientists to communicate with publics in more meaningful ways beyond education, such as scientific discourse. The opportunities that accompany expanded internet and website capabilities creates need for a comprehensive guide to help scientists or scientific groups take advantage of the... Read More →
MR

Malik Robinson

Philosophy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Overlapping Otherness: A Phenomenological Approach to Black Sexuality | | The American Black community exhibits abnormally intense homophobia towards its own members. By examining “the lived experience of the Black man” through the phenomenological lens of Jean-Paul Sartre, Frantz Fanon was able to make notable progress in understanding what parts of experience influence the identity of a Black man. I propose to continue applying this lens to understand this phenomenon of culturally augmented homophobia. Sartre posited that the Other wields the powerful force of the human gaze... Read More →
BS

Ben Scuderi

Resource Economics and Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
An Examination of Production Effiency in New England's Oyster Aquaculture Industry | | Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread practice in New England, but few economic studies have focused on this industry. Several different production methods are currently employed in this region to raise oysters, each of which involves a different level of capital and labor intensity. This analysis seeks to determine whether there are significant differences in productivity resulting from employing these different oyster production methods. | | We employed a mixed-mode survey format to collect information from oyster growers. Respondents were given the option to complete our survey either online or by mail, and those who participated were compensated for their time with a $20 cash gift. This survey was sent to 530 oyster farms located throughout Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. We sent three rounds of surveys by mail and email, and have received 155 completed surveys, yielding a response rate of over 29%. | | This presentation identifies the factors that significantly contribute to oyster production efficiency. A stochastic frontier production function (SFPF) was estimated to evaluate the productive efficiency of oyster operations. This model allows us to investigate the relative contribution of different productive inputs to the overall productivity of each oyster farm. Additionally, we assess the impact of factors such as location experience, and diversity of species in determining the productive efficiency of each grower. | | This study provides a tool that allows oyster growers to evaluate the efficiency of the production methods they are currently employing. This analysis also has important policy implications. Assessing the relative efficiency of... Read More →
MT

Mackenzie Tefft

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Dyadic Interactions as They Relate to Emotional Adjustment in Adolescents. | | I AM A CUGR FELLOWSHIP AWARDEE. It is mandatory for me to attend, and I was unsure this was needed as well. | I will be completing my project under the guidance of Rebecca Schwartz-Mette Ph.D. in the Peer Relations Lab at the UMaine. Data for my thesis will be obtained through an ongoing project called the Maine Adolescent Peer Project. This study aims to examine emotional adjustment in adolescent friendships... Read More →
AT

Andrew Tomer

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
"They need to get over it": Native American mascot protest leads to social discounting | | There is a current gap in the stigma literature of what leads to prejudice and discrimination against Native Americans (NAs). However, existing literature does inform us about ambivalen... Read More →

Session Chair
AG

Aeleah Granger

Psychology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Muslim and Arab Prejudice: Understanding Emotions | | A socio-functional approach to prejudice posits that different out-groups are perceived to pose different types of threats (e.g., physical safety/security, economic, moral, etc.), which elicit different emotional responses from in-group members. Muslims and Arabs in the United States face a great deal of prejudice in their day to day lives, but are underrepresented in the existing literature. Although Arab and Muslim groups are independent, it appears they are often conflated and confused. This research investigates the different types of threats that each of four groups, African Americans, Atheists, Arabs, and Muslims, are perceived to pose. Emotions toward each out-group were measured as well as individual difference characteristics, such as social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and religious fundamentalism. Findings suggest that there is little emotional distinction in reactions toward Muslims and Arabs and indicate that Muslims and Arabs may be perceived as both symbolic and realistic threats. This exploratory research will help create a better understanding the nature of prejudice toward Muslims and Arabs with hopes for reducing the negative emotions elicited by these minority groups. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
AO

Anna Olsen

International Affairs with a concentration in culture, conflict and globalization, minors in archaeology, biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ottoman Archaeology at Nadin-Gradina, Croatia, 2016 The Ottoman era remains an under-explored component of Mediterranean archaeology, despite its place as one of the great world empires. This era of history, however, is the key to linking prehistory to the modern landscape. The study of the Ottoman Empire and its various conquests from an archaeological perspective holds the potential to seamlessly unite the ancient and the modern, to form an elegant and comprehensible continuity of the human story, and in this case, as it pertains to the Mediterranean. In the eastern Adriatic region of Croatia, the archaeological record of the Nadina-Gradina site reflects a vast array of cultural identities over the past 3,000 years, from Liburnian Iron Age to Roman, to Medieval and Ottoman. Here, the Ottoman period links the ancient world to the modern, presenting an opportunity to investigate this long continuum of human experience. In the summer of 2016, the Nadin-Gradina archaeological project focused in part on this Ottoman component. In an effort to understand the extent to which the Ottoman Empire impacted people, land, and livelihood in this area, the project began to map and excavate structures from this era of occupation. Efforts focused on a monumental a fortress shrouded in trees and a smaller structure interpreted to have been a mosque. These structures were documented using high resolution photographs from a drone-mounted camera and processed using Agisoft Photoscan software to create accurate digital 3D models. When combined with 2015 findings, the results shed light on this latest occupational phase at Nadin-Gradina and provide a cost-effective and efficient manner to field document and map the archaeological record. | | Faculty Mentor: Gregory... Read More →
BS

Ben Scuderi

Resource Economics and Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
An Examination of Production Effiency in New England's Oyster Aquaculture Industry | | Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread practice in New England, but few economic studies have focused on this industry. Several different production methods are currently employed in this region to raise oysters, each of which involves a different level of capital and labor intensity. This analysis seeks to determine whether there are significant differences in productivity resulting from employing these different oyster production methods. | | We employed a mixed-mode survey format to collect information from oyster growers. Respondents were given the option to complete our survey either online or by mail, and those who participated were compensated for their time with a $20 cash gift. This survey was sent to 530 oyster farms located throughout Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. We sent three rounds of surveys by mail and email, and have received 155 completed surveys, yielding a response rate of over 29%. | | This presentation identifies the factors that significantly contribute to oyster production efficiency. A stochastic frontier production function (SFPF) was estimated to evaluate the productive efficiency of oyster operations. This model allows us to investigate the relative contribution of different productive inputs to the overall productivity of each oyster farm. Additionally, we assess the impact of factors such as location experience, and diversity of species in determining the productive efficiency of each grower. | | This study provides a tool that allows oyster growers to evaluate the efficiency of the production methods they are currently employing. This analysis also has important policy implications. Assessing the relative efficiency of... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Rooms 1-3

9:15am

Poster Presentations – Arts
Speakers
OA

Oliver Adams

Engineering Physics, Mathematics, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Gesture Recognition Based Research | | Gestures are the most natural forms of expression that we use. May it be a shake of the head or a wave of the hand these are the basic building blocks of human expression. Keyboards and are not an intuitive medium through which humans connect with computers. Through the advent of gesture recognition, we are able begin interacting with computers in a way that is more natural. This research is looking at new affordances of natural gestures as an interface with technology. By creating simple development tools for gesture recognition, we are creating a more accessible medium through which users can interact with computers. This software focuses on foundational gestures such as swipes, clicking and dragging. | | Faculty Mentor: Mike... Read More →
MB

Meaghan Byrnes

Political Science, Philosophy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
iSWOOP | | The U.S. National Park Service has noted a decline over the past decade in public awareness of both parks’ unique natural features and the scientific research conducted onsite. Key to generating awareness is effective communication between park personnel and visitors. STEM education specialists working with the Park Service have identified two-way... Read More →

Judges
AP

Amy Pierce

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cake Smash 2017 | | Contemporary American wedding culture is dominated by expectations of perfection. Perfection myths of bridehood are propagated by the wedding industry and voluntarily consumed and self-imposed by American brides. I am researching the prevalence and affects of a phenomenon, which I have coined... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Ballroom

9:15am

Poster Presentations – Biomedical Sciences
Speakers
LA

Linda Archambault

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Zebrafish Mucosal Infection Model Illuminates Host-Pathogen Interactions During Yeast Infection. | | Yeasts are part of the healthy microbiome of human gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts but can cause invasive and systemic disease in immunocompromised patients. Two species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis, account for the majority of hospital-acquired yeast infections. While C. albicans has long been the subject of research, relatively little is known about host-pathogen interactions involving C. parapsilosis. | The zebrafish immune system is remarkably like our own and their see-through larvae allow for intimately detailed monitoring of pathogen and host cell interactions using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. To better understand how epithelial tissues and innate immune cells interact with Candida species, we investigated aspects of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis mucosal infection in the zebrafish... Read More →
KA

Kevin Assoumou

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing the lipid binding interactions of calpain5 carboxy terminal domains | | Calpains are calcium dependent cysteine proteases. Their activity involves limited cleavage of target proteins upon activation by calcium. Calpain5 (CAPN5) is a non-classical member of the... Read More →
JB

Jim Barry

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Identification of Virulence Genes in Group B Streptococcus | | Streptococcus agalactiae is a common bacterium, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), that causes fatal infections in newborns, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. Treatment options are becoming limited due to increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains. Identifying novel virulence genes may accelerate development of alternative treatment options. This work focuses on the identification of novel genes that encode proteins secreted by GBS, which directly interact with host and are involved in GBS pathogenesis. Transposon mutagenesis of S. agalactiae 515 will be performed using a plasmid, carrying a composite transposon encoding an alkaline phosphatase with a signal sequence deletion, as well as, a kanamycin resistance determinant. Mutants with transposon insertions immediately downstream of a signal sequence for an extracellular protein gain alkaline phosphatase activity, kanamycin resistance, and lose a functional copy of the protein coding sequence that was interrupted by the transposon. The desired deletion strains with alkaline phosphatase activity can be identified based on their ability to grow on media supplemented with kanamycin, and utilize the substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP) to produce a light blue pigment. A library of such strains will be screened for virulence using the Streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Strains displaying a significant loss of virulence compared to the wild-type will be sequenced to identify the interrupted gene. This mutagenesis screen using the zebrafish infection model has successfully identified novel virulence genes in closely related microorganisms. Identification of new virulence genes will provide information for the development of new antimicrobial targets. | | Faculty Mentor: Melody... Read More →
AB

Audrey Bergeron

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Candida and Pseudomonas Interact to Enhance Infection in Transparent Zebrafish | | Infections comprised of multiple microbial species, such as bacteria and fungi, are called “mixed infections” and present a significant burden in hospitals, often complicating patient treatment... Read More →
DB

Drew Brooks

Microbiology, Music, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The Role of MyD88 in Neutrophil Recruitment to C. albicans infection in Zebra Fish Swimbladders | | Candida albicans is a commensal organism resident to healthy individuals. However, in immunocompromised hosts, C. albicans can become pathogenic, causing life-threatening candi... Read More →
MC

Molly Caron

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Antimicrobial Agent Triclosan’s Disruption of Mast Cell Function | | Triclosan (TCS) is a synthetic antimicrobial designed to act against a broad spectrum of bacteria. It is widely used in hospitals, the food industry, and some toothpastes at approximately 10mM concentrations. TCS has been found to be efficiently absorbed by human skin, resulting in exposure to many cell types in the body. Previous studies have shown that non-cytotoxic concentrations of TCS, as low as 1... Read More →
NC

Nicklaus Carter

Biomedical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Nanocellulose Conduits for Enhanced Regeneration of Peripheral Nerve Injury | | Peripheral neuropathy is estimated to afflict 20 million people in the United States. Most cases of neuropathy result from physical injuries and trauma arising from automobile accidents and war. P... Read More →
SD

Sara DeMello

Nursing, 9:15AM-10:30AM
TED Stockings in the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism (Section A Poster 9) | | The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of TED stockings in preventing deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients. | In hospitalized patients, lower extremity deep-vein thromboembolism is the most commonly seen type of venous thromboembolism. In the United States alone, one in every twenty patients will develop a DVT. A DVT is a serious and potentially life-threatening complication. The use of Thrombo Embolic Deterrent (TED) stockings is one method mechanical prophylaxis that is commonly seen in hospital settings. These tight stockings work by compressing the veins in the legs, reducing edema and venous stasis, which, in turn, reduces the chances of a clot forming in the veins. A search for existing studies was performed using databases such as Cochrane and CINAHL. Specific terms and words such as... Read More →
BD

Brandon Dufault

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Palmitoylation by PAZ2 of Dictyostellium discoidium | | The interesting life cycle of D. discoidium involves single cell growth by standard mitosis while following a period of general population starvation, cells enter a developmental phase to their life cycle. In the developmental phase cells will aggregate into a multicellular organism and begin a process of transformation involving numerous changes in gene expression. Cell-cell communication via plasma membrane receptor plays a crucial role in this process. We are studying a family of enzyme that modify proteins with palmitic acid which localizes them to the plasma membrane. This gene family named... Read More →
BE

Brian Elsemore

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The Isolation and Characterization of Mycobacteriophage TBrady12 | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. smegmatis. Understanding bacteriophage and their infectious pathways is essential to understan... Read More →
JG

Jillian Gori

Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Confirmation of Hippocampal Dendritic Spine Plasticity after Exercise Using the Classic Golgi Stain | | It is known that certain regions of the adult brain can undergo neurogenesis to produce new neurons and glia from stem cells. Research has identified the presence of adult... Read More →
JG

Jeremy Grant

Biomedical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Multiplexed SERS imaging in biological systems using biocompatible Raman active nanostars | | The objective of this study is to design a nanoparticle labeling system suited for enhanced Raman micro-spectroscopic imaging to directly probe the concentration, chemical dynamics, and spatial distribution of individual Raman active nanoprobes at nanometer length scales in biological systems. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), using specifically engineered spherical metallic nanoprobes for chemical sensing, has received considerable attention recently. It is considered a powerful alternative to fluorescence labeling, offering several advantages over traditional methods, including increased photostability, narrower emission peaks, allowing for simultaneous observation of a larger number of... Read More →
JH

Jordan Hayes

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The Role of TNFAIP8L1 in Tumor Development | | Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Despite new advances in therapy, alternative strategies must continuously be pursued. Recently the human TNFAIP8 gene family has been linked to the development of multiple cancer types, including lung cancer. The TNFAIP8L1 gene has demonstrated a role as a tumor suppressor, though little else is known about its function. Through comparative genomic approaches, our laboratory recently identified a zebrafish ortholog to the human TNFAIP8L1 gene. To obtain a better understanding of the function of TNFAIP8L1 in tumorigenesis, zebrafish tumor xenotransplantation models are being developed to understand the contribution TNFAIP8L1 makes to tumorigenesis through its effect on tumor cells and other cells in their microenvironment. An amino acid alignment found that the human TNFAIP8L1 and zebrafish Tnfaip8l1 proteins share 68.3% identity (95.2% similarity). As a first step to characterize the tumor-intrinsic effects TNFAIP8L1 expression has on tumor development, we are performing in vitro and in vivo experiments using H1299 human lung cancer cells. We are generating H1299 cell lines that either overexpress human TNFAIP8L1 or knockdown TNFAIP8L1. An in vitro proliferation assay using the... Read More →
MH

Muhammad Hossen

Chemistry, Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Dry & Wet Stiffness Increase and Structure Stabilization of Cellulose Nanofibrils (CNF) Aerogels in Aqueous Environment (Room 4 Presenter 3, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Porous cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) based aerogels are capable of absorbing and storing a significant amount of liquid inside the 3D structure. As the porosity of the CNF aerogels goes higher, the amount of liquid absorption increases linearly. One of the biggest problems of 3D CNF aerogels with high porosity is that the structure breaks down very rapidly in aqueous environments. Here we describe a method to overcome this deficiency by adding methacrylate functionalized carboxymethyl cellulose (MetCMC) into the CNF system followed by crosslinking between the methacrylate groups of MetCMC. The resultant polymer composite matrix successfully maintains a robust 3D structure without collapsing when rewetted and stored in aqueous environments. When rewetted CNF-MetCMC composite is freeze dried it maintains its size and shape whereas air drying causes shrinkage of the volume. Air dried CNF-MetCMC swells and increases in volume to some extent when rewetted. A greater mass fraction of CNF in the whole composition stabilizes the air dried structure against swelling in an aqueous environment. Cross-linking between methacrylate groups enhances the dry and wet modulus of CNF-MetCMC aerogels | | Co-authors: Alexander Lafrance, Matthew Talbot, Michael D Mason | | Measurement of Porosity of CNF Aerogels Using Silicone Oil (Section A Poster 27, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Freeze drying of aqueous slurries of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with different wt% of water generates CNF aerogels with different porosities. Measurement of CNF... Read More →
EI

Emily Illingworth

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Host range and genomic variation in mycobacteriophage | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are abundant viruses that infect bacteria of the genus Mycobacterium. Pathogenic species of Mycobacterium, including M. tuberculosis, carry prophage that are hypothesized to contribute to virulence. The term... Read More →
PI

Phasathon Itthipalakorn

Molecular and Cellular Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Zebrafish Genome Editing using CRISPR | | The discovery of using CRISPR as the genome editor is considered to be a breakthrough of the decade. It is believed that within the next year, pioneers will be awarded the Nobel prize for the discovery. The Wheeler lab is using CRISPR... Read More →
avatar for Alyssa Jones

Alyssa Jones

Molecular and Cellular Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Functional Analysis of an Enzymatic Protein Acyltransferase Protein palmitoylation, a reversible protein modification carried out by cells, is important because palmitoylated proteins are involved in cell signaling roles in growth, proliferation, vesicle trafficking and many other important cell functions. Dictyostelium discoideum is a suitable model organism because it contains a family of protein acyltransferases, the enzymes that carry out palmitoylation. Previous work in Dr... Read More →
KL

Katherine Larochelle

Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
A Ferocious Phage Earns it Stripes: Characterization of ShereKhan | | Bacteriophage (phage), viruses that infect bacteria, are the most abundant biological entities in the biosphere, with an estimated 1031 particles worldwide. Mycobacteriophage, viruses that infect species of... Read More →
DL

Daniel Lesko

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Host range expansion in mycobacteriophage | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect mycobacteria and are among the most abundant, diverse, and rapidly evolving biological entities on the planet. As a result, these phage are an important tool in the study of genetic relationships, but very little is known about them relative to their quantity. Over 1,000 phage have been sequenced through the SEA-PHAGES program, a microbiology learning initiative developed by The University of Pittsburgh that aims to put research into the hands of undergraduates. However, the majority of phage were isolated using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155, which is limiting what we understand about host range. Phage are sorted into clusters based on genome structure and sequence similarity. To gain a better understanding of how phage interact with other mycobacterial species, we determined the host range of phage representative of mycobacteriophage clusters... Read More →
CL

Chloe Lilly

Plasma patterned infused paper substrates for controlled bacterial adhesion | | Patterning substrates to create regions of varying surface chemistry for biological adhesion plays a key role in diagnostics and in vitro bioassays. However, problems arise when trying to control... Read More →
JL

Jacob Longfellow

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
LincRNA Dysregulation Upon Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Zebrafish | | LincRNAs are long intergenic non-coding RNA that are largely uncharacterized and, until recently, believed to serve little to no purpose in our genome. Recent studies have shown lincRNAs to be involved in many important biological processes such as embryonic development, transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and immunity. The Kim lab is particularly interested in the role of lincRNAs in immunity in response to infection, and one very important infection is from the common nosocomially acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is very common in hospital-bound patients with weakened immune systems and can lead to sepsis and death. | In order to better understand and characterize lincRNAs in this role, it is critical to study their mechanisms in vivo. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is regarded as an excellent in vivo model, because of the ease with which it can be genetically manipulated, its transgenic lines, and its sole reliance on the innate immune system during the first 4-6 weeks of development. In addition, the... Read More →
MM

Megan MacIsaac

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Innate Immune Response to Group B Streptococcus Infection in Zebrafish Larvae | | Streptococcus agalactiae is a Group B Streptococcal bacterium that can colonize the vaginal and rectal mucosa as a commensal organism, as well as cause systemic invasive infections in older adults and newborns. The cell envelope surrounding a bacterial cell is an important defense, allowing it to survive in the host environment. Our aim is to investigate the role of the CpsA protein, which plays a role in the production of the capsule polysaccharide of S. agalactiae, in disease and in recruitment of immune cells in both systemic and localized infections of zebrafish larvae. Characterization of the innate immune response will verify that the polysaccharide capsule is a valid candidate for use as a target for antimicrobial therapies and vaccine development. We are using zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae as a model for host pathogenesis because their transparency allows for visualization of disease progression in the host and their well-developed innate immune response is similar to that of humans. We are injecting zebrafish larvae with wild-type S.agalactiae and with two strains that carry significantly less polysaccharide capsule on the outside of the cell. Mortality over a 3-day period is being recorded, and time-lapse microscopy will be performed to document immune cell recruitment in response to infection with the different bacterial strains. Based on previous studies on the role of the CpsA protein in virulence, we expect to observe that the capsule-mutated strain is significantly less able to establish an infection in zebrafish larvae, resulting in lower mortality. | | Faculty Mentor: Melody... Read More →
avatar for Paige Martin

Paige Martin

Biomedical Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterization of Novel SMARD1 and CMT Mouse Models | | Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD1) is a lethal infantile disease, characterized by the loss of motor neurons, diaphragmatic paralysis and weakness in the truck and limbs. Mutations in human Ighmbp2, a member of the DNA helicase/ATPase family of proteins, have been shown to cause SMARD1. Recently mutations have been shown to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a less severe disease characterized by progressive motor and sensory polyneuropathy. Currently there is only one mouse model to study mutations in Ighmbp2, the neuromuscular degeneration (nmd) mouse. A previously identified modifier region MnmC, shows that genetic background can play a role in the severity of disease in the nmd mouse, by suppressing the disease altogether. New alleles are needed in order to study the variation seen, as well as interrogate the modifier region. We have created four new nmd alleles: two very severe and one less severe SMARD1-like phenotypes, one mild CMT-like phenotype. These new alleles are also being tested for disease modification that is seen in the current nmd model by the MnmC region. What is unknown is how the MnmC region suppresses the disease. Testing this region with our new will allow us to identify if it still suppresses the disease in a null allele. We aim to identify what specifically in the region is causing suppression. To do this we have knocked-out a candidate gene in the region. By identifying the modifier and how it works, we will understand what cellular and molecular functions and pathways Ighmbp2 partakes in. Further understanding of the mechanistic role of Ighmbp2 in motor neurons may help to bridge the therapeutic barrier. The creation and characterization of these novel alleles and interrogation of the MnmC region, broadens the knowledge of the function of Ighmbp2 in the motor neurons and will allow us to identify potential therapeutic strategies. | | Faculty Mentor: Greg... Read More →
SM

Sari Mayhue

M.S. Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
A Potential Correlation Between p53 Expression and the TNFAIP8 Gene Family in Tumorigenesis | | Cancer affects forty percent of the U.S. population every year, and with less than adequate therapeutic interventions, largely results in a poor prognosis. A variety of widely used cancer therapies, to include chemotherapy, radiation, and invasive surgery, often result in severe and intolerable side effects as well as drug resistance. In addition, these therapies lack long term efficacy due to poorly understood cancer-associated gene mechanisms. It has been demonstrated that TNFAIP8 (tumor necrosis factor alpha induced protein-8) gene family plays a role in tumor development, although the mechanisms by which they participate in tumorigenesis have not been well established. Our... Read More →
HM

Hannah Melotto

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Identification and characterization of late promoters in the cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele | | Mycobacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria of the genus Mycobacterium. In 2011, the cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele was isolated at the University of Maine and its genomic DNA was sequenced. Promoters are sequences of DNA, used by the RNA polymerase to bind to the genome and initiate transcription. Promoters usually include several components; a... Read More →
SM

Sam Mildrum

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing regulatory effects of zebrafish tnfaip8l2a and tnfaip8l2b on tumorigenesis | | The Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha-Induced Protein 8-Like 2 (TNFAIP8l2) gene has been shown to suppress tumorigenesis in mammals. It is known that the TNFAIP8l2 protein inactivates the small GTPase, Rac1, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression of tumorigenesis. Using a comparative genomics approach based upon conserved synteny, we have identified two zebrafish orthologues (tnfaip8l2a and tnfaip8l2b) to the human TNFAIP8L2. It is unclear if the zebrafish orthologue conserves its biological function. If functionality remains, the zebrafish could serve as a model for human TNFAIP8L2 function. We are performing in vitro cell proliferation assay and developing an in vivo human tumor cell xenotransplantation model in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate how zebrafish tnfaip8l2a and tnfaip8l2b affects tumor growth. We also plan to describe the regulatory function of tnfaip8l2a and tnfaip8l2b have during tumorigenesis through a Rac1 activation assay. Collectively, if functional conservation can be validated, the zebrafish could serve as a novel vertebrate model to help develop anti-tumor strategies that may yield innovative alternate therapies for cancer. | | Faculty Mentor: Con... Read More →
VP

Vasiliki Papakotsi

Human Nutrition, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Polyphenols in Wild Blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) inhibit Complement Activation by Targeting C1s-mediated Cleavage of C4 | | Ingestion of berries containing polyphenols are associated with lower risk of inflammatory, metabolic, cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. Diet has been shown to modulate the activation of the complement system, a set of over 50 proteins present in the circulation and tissues that reacts in response to damage or microbial encounter and is critical for the maintenance of homeostasis. Imbalanced activation is tightly correlated with inflammation and various pathologies. Wild blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins and phenolic acids, which can be found in plasma shortly after consumption. Given the involvement of both complement and polyphenols in the modulation of inflammation, we investigated whether wild blueberries modulate the activation of the complement system. Phenolic- and anthocyanin-rich fractions were extracted from freeze-dried wild blueberry powder, were characterized by liquid chromatography and used in in vitro complement inhibition assays. We documented that both fractions inhibit the activation of the complement classical pathway in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 of... Read More →
WP

William Petterson

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The life-changing magic of SallySpecial: a viral tale of a true minimalist | | A bacteriophage (phage) is a virus that infects a bacterium. Phage exist in great diversity in the environment, but only a small proportion of these viruses have been characterized. Knowledge of vi... Read More →
AR

Ashley Ronzo

Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Mechanisms for Adult Neurogenesis in the Hypothalamus | | The hypothalamus takes on many vital roles involving homeostasis, including the regulation of energy balance (appetite, energy expenditure). It is also a site postulated to undergo aspects of adult neural plasticity, i... Read More →
AS

Allison Scherer

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Dissemination of C. albicans is supported by immune cell response and barrier disruption Candida albicans, a small non-motile fungus, lives on the mucosal surface of most individuals. While it causes few problems for healthy people, it can be a serious pathogen in immunocompromised patients such as those with HIV/AIDs, corticosteroid or broad-spectrum antibiotic use, or those undergoing cancer treatment. In severe cases, C. albicans can cause disseminated disease that spreads throughout the body and often results in mortality. Mechanisms proposed for this process include the... Read More →
SS

Stephanie Sears

Nursing, 9:15AM-10:30AM
A Review of Literature of Nurse Residency Program Retention Rates | | PICO question: In new graduate nursing students, is there a higher rate of retention at hospitals that implement nurse residency programs? | | Topic and Purpose: | New graduate nurses (NGN) makeup 10% of the nursing workforce. Traditionally, NGN have low retention rates and many leave their first nursing job or the profession all together. In the first 12 months, 13-75% of new graduate nurses leave the profession, with 24% intending to leave before their 24th month. The cost of replacing novice nurses ranges from $49,000 to $92,000 per nurse. To combat the significant turnover rate of new graduate nurses and associated costs, institutions have begun to implement nurse residency programs. Studies have shown a significant decrease in turnover rate after successful completion of residency programs. | | Method: | An electronic search of the literature was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The search strategy used the following keywords: nurse residency programs, new nurse retention, job satisfaction, and novice nurse turnover. The review will be limited to peer-reviewed studies and reviews, published in English, and published after 2012. | | Results: | Group members will collaborate to determine which of the studies retrieved are most applicable to this review. Findings will be analyzed and presented with possible applications for the future. | | Conclusion: | The literature suggests nurse residency programs improve new nurse turnover rates, which is associated with decreased costs to the hospitals. | | References: | Kram, S... Read More →
BS

Brittany Seman

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Yeast and Filaments Have Independent, Specialized Roles During Disseminated Fungal Infections | | Each year, invasive fungal infections kill between 30-50% of patients who have weakened immune systems due to chemotherapy and corticosteroid use. Most of these fungal infections... Read More →
ES

Erica Sewell

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing the M. chelonae Bergey Prophage | | Mycobacteriophage (phage), are viruses that infect bacteria. All bacteria can be infected by phage, and each bacterial species has a unique set of phage that infect them, making phage prime candidates for studying viral diversity and evolution. Some phage integrate their genome into the host genome upon infection (prophage), where they may potentially remain indefinitely, coevolving with the host, and providing growth factors and other benefits to the host. The purpose of my research is to characterize a prophage within the genome of the bacterial host Mycobacterium chelonae Bergey to determine if it is still functional and potentially impacting the fitness of the host bacterium. Characterization of this prophage has revealed that multiple genes are conserved with regard to both the DNA and protein sequences. The integrase cassette is highly conserved, complete with integrase and two potential repressors, suggesting the phage may be capable of excising from the host genome. Multiple structural genes including capsid and tail proteins are also conserved, suggesting the prophage may be capable of producing intact virions. Recent experiments have shown that at least two prophage genes are transcriptionally active. These include a predicted repressor and transmembrane protein. Expression of these genes suggests that the prophage does indeed have some potential for affecting the biology of the host bacterium. Experiments are currently underway to determine if intact virion particles are being expressed. | | Faculty Mentor: Keith... Read More →
SL

Sarai L Smith

Microbiology, Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
RNA-seq analysis of cluster E phage Ukulele | | Mycobacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria of the genus Mycobacterium. They are ideal subjects for undergraduate research, as they are easily isolated and can infect non-pathogenic M. smegmatis, which serves as an analog to the clinically relevant M. tuberculosis. Further, their genomes are diverse and accessible, allowing students exposure to the fields of genomics, bioinformatics, and evolution. Mycobacteriophage Ukulele was isolated in 2011 by students on the University of Maine campus, and its genome was sequenced and annotated. Ukulele belongs to cluster E, a poorly characterized group of mycobacteriophage. Through computational analysis some genes were assigned functions, but the majority are still unknown. Likewise, the predicted regulatory sequences, such as promoters, terminators, and regulatory RNAs, in... Read More →
RS

Robert Soohey

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Identifying genes essential for integration and lysogeny in cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele | | Mycobacteriophage are viruses that infect Mycobacterium, including nonpathogenic M. smegmatis and pathogenic M. tuberculosis. Their genomes are diverse and the majority of their genes have no known function. Mycobacteriophage Ukulele was isolated from soil at the University of Maine. Ukulele is temperate, carrying out both a lysogenic and lytic lifestyle. Temperate phage typically encode integrase, excise, and repressor proteins, which regulate the change from lysogenic to lytic growth. Ukulele gp49 has been identified as the integrase but repressor and excise proteins have not been identified. The first aim of this project is to confirm the function of gp52 by creating a strain of M. smegmatis that over expresses Ukulele gp52, a candidate repressor gene. If gp52 has repressor or excise functions, over expression of gp52 in Ukulele-infected M. smegmatis cells will alter Ukulele plaque morphology. The second aim is to analyze Ukulele-M. smegmatis lysogen transcription patterns to further define which genes may be essential for lysogeny. The data will help confirm the expression of genes that are predicted to have functions during lysogeny, including gp52, identify additional repressor gene candidates, and possibly identify genes outside of the integrase cassette that potentially increase bacterial fitness. | | Faculty Mentor: Joshua Kelley, Sally... Read More →
SS

Stephen Soohey

Molecular and Cellular Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Role of G-protein regulation of Formins during Gradient Tracking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae | | The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses a GPCR to direct the pheromone response pathway. Haploid yeast detect and respond to pheromone gradients produced by the opposite mating ty... Read More →
ES

Emily Spaulding

Neuroscience, 9:15AM-10:30AM
In vivo translational profiling of motor neurons in two mouse models of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 2D suggests impaired translation and mitochondrial dysfunction. | | Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a collection of debilitating peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in over 80 genes. The heterogeneity of the disease, as well as the technical challenge of studying the mammalian peripheral neuron in vivo, both contribute to the lack of a cure. Dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS), the enzyme that charges glycine onto cognate tRNAs during translation, cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2D (CMT2D). How mutations in GARS cause CMT2D is unclear. However, impaired translation has recently emerged as a potential disease mechanism based on work with Drosophila models of CMT2D. We are using two in vivo, cell type-specific approaches to profile translation in motor neurons of two mouse models of CMT2D: (1) non-canonical amino acid-tagging (NCAT) provides the location, identity, and quantity of newly translated proteins, and (2) ribosome-tagging catalogs ribosome-associated RNA. We are separately profiling motor neuron cell bodies from the spinal cord and axons from the sciatic nerve, providing additional cell compartment-specificity. Although local translation in healthy, adult, mammalian axons is not established, it does occur during regeneration after injury, and our initial studies using NCAT suggest that CMT2D motor axons show a regenerative phenotype. Therefore, we are also profiling regenerating wild-type motor neurons after sciatic nerve crush for comparison against mutant Gars samples. Our approach is creating translational profiles of CMT2D, healthy wild-type, and regenerating wild-type motor neuron cell bodies and axons. These data have revealed impaired translation in CMT2D motor neuron cell bodies, and further suggest mitochondrial dysfunction. | | Faculty Mentor: Robert... Read More →
BS

Barclay 'Summer' Streitfeld

Philosophy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Investigation of the Chemistry and Biology of EM2487 | | The Streptomyces metabolite EM2487 suppresses Tat functions, stopping HIV replication in acute and chronic disease models. This is a novel discovery that could greatly improve Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART), thus creating a potential cure. The unique chemical and biological attributes of EM2487 led to a total synthesis and the unkown structural features were studied using NMR computations, synthetic chemistry, and degradation methods. Future studies will delve deeper into the structure-function relationship in order to further synthesize and discover analogues with pharmacokinetic benefits. | | Faculty Mentor: Matthew... Read More →
AS

Anna Struba

Biochemistry, Molecular & Cellular Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Evaluation of Lytic Gene Expression in Cluster E Mycobacteriophage Ukulele using RNAseq | | Mycobacteriophage are a diverse group of viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. Mycobacteriophage are effective molecular tools that allow for the manipulation and study of host cells. Studying host-phage interactions is important because many pathogenic bacteria carry prophage, or phage genomes integrated in the host genome. This is hypothesized to contribute to bacterial fitness or virulence. Due to their diversity and abundance, mycobacteriophage are organized into clusters according to genomic similarities. Some clusters are well characterized while others are not, such as cluster E. Cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele was isolated in 2011 by UMaine students... Read More →
ST

Sareena Toothaker

Biochemistry, Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Marek's Disease in Maine: a Practical Approach | | Marek’s Disease Virus (MDV) is a herpesvirus infecting chickens, causing Marek’s Disease (MD). Marek’s Disease leads to immunosuppression, tumors, paralysis, and death. It is an airborne pathogen, so it spreads easily, and it has no known cure, which is why awareness and prevention are very important. There are currently vaccines for MD, though rising MDV virulence may render vaccines ineffective. Maine, with a proud history of poultry production, also has a history of MD. The goal of this project is to characterize birds most at risk of MD, to survey small flock producers about MD risk in Maine, and to develop recommendations for avoiding spread of MD in Maine. We queried the University of... Read More →
PT

Panagiotis Tsakiroglou

Cardiovascular Research, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The effect of wild blueberry (Vaccinum angustifolium) bioactives (anthocyanins and phenolics) on angiogenesis | | Angiogenesis is a normal biological process that occurs in tissue development and is highly linked to wound healing and a plethora of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis. This study investigates the effect of anthocyanin (ACN) and phenolic acid (PA)-rich fractions and their combination from wild blueberry powder (Vaccinum angustifolium) on angiogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C [HUVEC... Read More →
JW

Jasmine Waite

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM
Determining gene expression profile changes in cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele infection (Section A Poster, 23  9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts, including pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-pathogenic M. smegmatis. Understanding phage-host interactions is important considering that pathogenic strains of Mycobacterium typically carry prophage. Prophage are latent phage genomes integrated into the host's DNA and are hypothesized to contribute to bacterial virulence or fitness. We are investigating the impact of cluster E phage lytic and lysogenic infection on host M. smegmatis. Mycobacteriophage possess diverse genomes, are abundant and ubiquitous, and much of their population remains to be explored and understood. Clusters are used to organize mycobacteriophage based upon genome similarity. While some clusters are well-characterized, the knowledge of Cluster E remains underdeveloped. The genome of Cluster E phage Ukulele was previously sequenced and annotated with some gene functions predicted. This provides insight to the biology of Ukulele, but fails to explore host response to viral infection. RNA sequencing addresses this gap in knowledge, through isolation and subsequent analysis of RNA samples at pre-, early and late lytic infection time points. Based on gene expression profiles in M. smegmatis infected by mycobacteriophage Giles, we expect that host gene expression will be altered. Particular genes that were affected, as well as the biological motivations for these changes, are being explored. | | Examining CFTR and CYP2C19 Mutations through Genetic Screening (Table 5 Side L, 10:45 AM-12:00PM) | | Response to drugs can vary by patient, which may require testing before an effective treatment can be administered. In addition to these delays, early diagnosis of genetic diseases is not always available. Genetic screening provides a solution for this gap in patient knowledge. Screening may detect mutations within genes required for the activation of drugs as well as those linked to genetic diseases. The CFTR and CYP2C19 genes were investigated as representations of the importance of genetic analysis. The CFTR gene is responsible for regulating chloride ion movement across cell membranes; the two mutations investigated were M470V and... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Whitmore

Elizabeth Whitmore

Biomedical Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
3-D atomic resolution molecular modeling of chondroitin sulfate Proteoglycans are glycosylated proteins found in the extracellular matrix that also contribute to physiological pathways. Glycosylation of these proteins plays a key functional role, but is often overlooked in the literature as there are challenges with studying carbohydrate chains using current laboratory techniques. In order to examine the biophysical properties of a complete proteoglycan, we selected a small protein known as bikunin, which contains a single glycosaminoglycan, known as chondroitin sulfate (CS). Bikunin is secreted by hepatocytes and is thought to inhibit serine proteases in the kidneys by binding them to one of its two Kunitz-binding domains. However, there are gaps in the understanding of bikunin function because of the lack of 3-D atomic resolution structural information for the fully-glycosylated protein. It is known that CS is responsible for binding other large proteins to form various complexes with bikunin, impacting its function. The molecular mechanism by which these complexes form is still unclear. Although CS varies in length, composition, and sulfation, the literature suggests that there is little variation in the chain specific to bikunin. We have developed a biologically accurate 3-D atomic resolution structure of CS based on the suggested composition of the bikunin-specific sequence obtained from the literature. We performed triplicate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 500 nanoseconds each on this CS chain and analyzed structural patterns, overall charge, and end-to-end distance. These results have allowed us to develop a 3-D atomic resolution structure of the complete bikunin proteoglycan to be used in future MD simulation of bikunin. | | Faculty Mentor: Olgun... Read More →
MW

Michael Wilczek

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Elucidating the viral mechanisms of JC polyomavirus infection in brain cells critical in viral infection and disease progression | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) can establish an asymptomatic persistent lifelong infection in the kidneys in 50% of the population. In individuals who... Read More →

Judges
avatar for Christopher Baker

Christopher Baker

Faculty, The Jackson Laboratory
avatar for Erin Carter

Erin Carter

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Zebrafish as a Preclinical Model for Dystroglycanopathies Muscular dystrophies are heritable diseases characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Mutations in molecules that modify the dystroglycan protein cause a subset of muscular dystrophies known as secondary... Read More →
JD

Jeanne DuShane

Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
MAPK-ERK Regulates Transcription of JC polyomavirus | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects more than half of the human population and presents as a persistent, lifelong infection in the kidney. In individuals who are immunosuppressed, JCPyV infection can lead to the onset of the fatal, demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Dynamic interactions between the virus and host cell factors are responsible for driving the infectious life cycle, yet the role of cellular signaling pathways that promote the infectious process remain poorly understood. Previous work demonstrated that the activation of the mitogen associated protein kinase (MAPK) component, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), occurs within minutes of viral attachment and entry into host cells. Our research has elucidated that both the presence and activation of MAPK-ERK is necessary for JCPyV infection. To determine whether ERK activation is essential for specific steps during JCPyV infection, cells were treated chemical inhibitors to reduce ERK activation, and the impact on JCPyV infectivity was assessed. We found that while ERK is activated during the early steps in infection, its activity is not necessary for viral attachment, entry, or trafficking. However, inhibition of ERK activation leads to a significant decrease in both viral gene expression and viral promoter activity as measured using qPCR and viral promoter reporter assays. Thus, MAPK-ERK activation is required for later steps in the viral life cycle including viral transcription. These findings provide a more complete understanding of viral reprograming of host cell signaling pathways like MAPK-ERK, in order to promote infection and viral pathogenesis. | | Faculty Mentor: Melissa... Read More →
avatar for Lindsey Fitzsimons

Lindsey Fitzsimons

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Detailed in vivo comparison of two Wnt1:Cre models in the investigation of a role for primary cilia of cardiac neural crest cells (cNCC) in heart development. | | PROJECT AIMS: Our laboratory has uncovered a unique cardiac phenotype resulting from the elimination of the prima... Read More →
EF

Emma Fox

Ecology & Environmental Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Group Participatory Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (PMCDA) and Dam Decisions | | Dam decision-making can be challenging for riverine stakeholders; in particular, hydropower-regulated rivers have diverse and competing management objectives which complicate the decision-making process. Competing management objectives create a... Read More →
AL

Anne Lichtenwalner

University of Maine Veterinary Diagnostic Lab
avatar for Vicki Losick

Vicki Losick

Faculty, MDIBL
avatar for Melissa Maginnis

Melissa Maginnis

Faculty, UMAINE
CM

Colleen Mayberry

Microbiology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
JC Polyomavirus Utilizes Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis for Infectious Entry | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) establishes a lifelong, persistent, asymptomatic primary infection in the kidney in the majority of the human population. In immunocompromised individuals JCPyV disseminates to secondary sites of infection including the central nervous system where it establishes a lytic infection and is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal, demyelinating disease. JCPyV attachment is mediated by the interaction of viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) with... Read More →
MN

Melody Neely

Faculty, UMaine
I study infectious diseases using a zebrafish model. My research interests include analysis of the interactions that occur between the host and pathogen during an infection. We examine this dynamic interaction in real time using microscopy of labeled bacteria and zebrafish immu... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Ballroom

9:15am

Poster Presentations – Engineering
Speakers
HA

Hussein Abdulrazzaq

Chemical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Synthesis and characterization of catalysts for the conversion of bioethanol into butadiene | | Synthesis and characterization of catalysts for the conversion of bioethanol into butadiene | Authors: Hussein Abdulrazzaq, Thomas J. Schwartz | Abstract: | Butadiene is an impor... Read More →
MA

Mohammed Algharrawi

Chemical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Hydrodechlorinaion of chlorobenzene | | One important class of reactions is the cleavage of C-X bonds by the addition of hydrogen, referred to as hydrogenolysis. Several publications report the mechanism and reaction kinetics of the hydrogenolysis of C-Cl bonds in aromatic sy... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Allen

Meredith Allen

Chemical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The Etherification of HMF: One Step to Create Renewable Tunable Polymers from HMF There is a desire to use biomass to replace oil as the feedstock for modern chemicals and products. In this study, we seek to create tunable polymers using 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) as a renewable platform chemical. The properties of the final polymer can be tuned by modifying the side-chain of the monomer, which is added by the etherification of HMF. Several different catalysts with a variety of active sites and pore structures were evaluated for their activity in the etherification reaction. We have also evaluated the interplay of R-group identity and active site structure on the etherification kinetics. Catalysts possessing... Read More →
AA

Ahmed Almaghasilah

Electrical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Analysis of Mild Cognitive Impairment Sleep Data Using a Sleep Monitoring Device | | A precursor to forms of dementia including Alzheimer’s is Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) which may be identified by sleep fragmentation and sleep loss. A novel Sleep Monitoring device was co... Read More →
EA

Ezatollah Amini

Forest Resources, Renewable Nanomaterials, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Introduction of a novel formaldehyde-free binder system for particleboard manufacture | | Utilization of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) as an adhesive binder in the formulation of particleboard (PB) panels is introduced. The PB panels were produced in four different groups of ta... Read More →
AA

Armando Ayes

Electrical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Temperature Compensated Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for High Temperature Operation | | Industrial monitoring and control processes, power plants, aerospace industry, military equipment manufacturing, and oil and gas industries are examples of businesses in need fo... Read More →
NB

Nicole Bowen

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ultrasonic Elimination of Mosquito Larvae to Reduce Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus | | Ultrasonic Elimination of Mosquito Larvae to Reduce Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Transmission | Nicole Bowen, Ben Walton, David Perper | Caitlin Howell | Department of Chemical a... Read More →
WB

William Breeding

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Photocatalysis of Atrazine by various Bismuth Oxyhalides: Rates, Mechanisms and Byproducts (Section F Poster 22, 1:00PM-2:15PM) | | Atrazine has been found to be one of the most prevalent pollutant in worldwide water systems. Typically a result of herbicide runoff, the harmful environmental impacts of the compound cause novel methods of treatment to gain interest, such as photocatalysis. Photocatalysis involves the addition of a catalyst and light source for enhanced degradation of pollutants, and offers an efficient method for atrazine treatment in water. Bismuth oxyhalides (BiOX) have previously been investigated by the Patterson Research Group as catalysts for the degradation of atrazine, as results have shown comparable degradation rates to EPA photocatalytic standards. BiOX compounds will be doped with various nonmetals in attempt to enhance photocatalytic activity. The goal of this project is to assess various BiOX based... Read More →
OD

Oghenetega Dibie

Spatial Information Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Event Viewer – A platform for the exploration and visualization of events | | The need for exploratory spatial and temporal data analysis tools has increased with the growth of sensor systems that produce large data sets combining spatial, temporal, and thematic attributes. While geographic information system (GIS) software supports exploration of spatial data, and time series analysis tools, such as MATLAB, support exploration of temporal data, these tools do not intuitively present the spatial and temporal relationships between events. The developed prototype implements a framework for visualizing and exploring spatial, temporal and thematic sensor-based data. The prototype system is an initial realization of a conceptual model, the Event Viewer, designed by Kate Beard, Heather Deese, and Neal R. Pettigrew [A framework for visualization and exploration of... Read More →
CD

Chris Dufour

Computer Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Analyzing the Scalability of Embedded Ice Sheet Modeling | | Understanding the impact of global climate change is a critical concern for society at large. One important piece of the climate puzzle is how large-scale ice sheets, such as those covering Greenland and Antarctica, respond to a warming climate. Given such ice sheets are under constant change, developing models that can accurately capture their dynamics represents a significant challenge to researchers. An emerging modeling paradigm to capture the dynamics of an ice sheet model is through model embedding, where a high-resolution ice sheet model is embedded within a large-scale low-resolution ice sheet model. Such a method has computer performance implications that are not yet fully understood, particularly because computational resources are divided among the models. | This poster presents a study into the scalability of model embedding with large-scale state-of-the-art supercomputers. Our overall goal is to prove that the embedded model can scale well with large numbers of processors, compared to non-embedded ice sheet modeling. For our tests, we utilize the Stampede supercomputer, housed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. Using Stampede we have simulated both embedded and non-embedded models at varying core counts. The embedded model has also been simulated at varying processor distributions, where the high resolution model is given a larger or smaller share of the processors. Our initial findings show that the embedded model enjoys a decrease in run-time with increasing processor counts. We have also shown that twenty-five percent of processors devoted to the high-resolution embedded model provides the best overall performance. | | Faculty Mentor: Phillip... Read More →
AF

Andria Foster

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
The BioStretch: Zebrafish Edition | | Chemotherapy is a vital treatment process for millions of cancer patients; however there are many severe side effects due to the chemotherapeutic agents used. One such chemotherapeutic agent is Paclitaxel, which has been shown to induce e... Read More →
SG

Shokoofeh Ghasemi

School of Forest Resources, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Production and characterization of continuous filaments from cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), a novel application of wood based materials | | A novel method for the production of filaments from cellulose nanofibers is proposed in order to find a new application for wood based materials. Properties of filaments produced from three different nanocellulose suspensions are studied. These were obtained by grinding the original CNF in different grinding times of 50 minutes, 100 minutes and. A new setting of syringe spinning is introduced for nanocellulose filament production and the resulted filaments were air dried. Morphology of the samples were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Surface properties of samples were studied using surface analysis and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). Influence of grinding time on mechanical properties of the CNF filaments were further investigated through tensile tests. Statistical testing was used for the comparison of the results and it was observed that grinding CNF has a significant influence on the tensile properties of the filaments. | | Faculty Mentor: Mehdi... Read More →
ZH

Zachary Hutchinson

Computer Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
sFROST: a Spiking Model of Working Memory Maintenance | | Neurocomputational modeling is a powerful tool for grounding explanations of cognitive processes within neuroanatomical and neurophysiological constraints. The FROST (FROntal-Striatal-Thalamic) model of working memory maintenance proposes that to-be- remembered items are encoded in the lateral prefrontal cortex and maintenance depends upon reverberant activity in a network of cortical and subcortical structures (i.e., basal ganglia, thalamus). The original version of FROST predicted continuous membrane potentials. In the present work, we develop a spiking version of FROST (sFROST) that offers an increase in neurobiological realism. Benchmark simulations demonstrate that sFROST successfully accounts for single-cell recording data and human behavioral data. The impact of scaling the model (i.e., increasing number and connectivity of neurons) and adding a more detailed basal ganglia network will be investigated. | | Faculty Mentor: Shawn... Read More →
LK

Lydia Kifner

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing vernal pool biogeochemistry across a land use gradient in Maine, USA | | Vernal pools are small seasonal wetlands that are crucial for maintaining amphibian and reptile biodiversity in forests in northeastern North America. The pools’ sizes make them especially... Read More →
KM

Kayla Marquis

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Fast, Cheap, and Simple Device to Detect Red Blood Cell Rupture (Table 14 Side L, 10:45AM-12:00PM) | | When red blood cells rupture, free hemoglobin is released, resulting in severe health complications if not immediately detected. Traditional free hemoglobin detection methods r... Read More →
KM

Keegan McKim

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Creating a Seamless Robot Design for the Application of Synthetic Liquid-Repellent Surfaces in Soft Robots | | Recently, soft robots have created significant interest in the scientific community due to their applications in industry, agriculture, the medical field, and more. However, the majority of these applications expose the soft robot to harmful fouling agents such as blood, dirt, or oil. To overcome this problem, SLIPS Technologies, a materials company in Massachusetts, has created a slippery surface that uses the recently discovered concept of immobilized liquid layers to repel both simple and complex foulants. One of the challenges that SLIPS Technologies is currently facing is that their... Read More →
NN

Nhu Nguyen

Mechanical Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Mooring Load Analysis on Oyster Farm in Estuary | | The goal of this project is to observe different environmental loading that affect the performance of the long-line rope and mooring system of an oyster farm. A proper design of the mooring lines and anchoring system requires an evaluation of the forces that affect the system, which are divided into quasi-static and dynamic loads. The quasi-static loads mainly include weight and buoyancy, while the dynamic loads include wind, current and wave forces. Tidal variations primarily induce changes in static tension of the lines, which in turn manifest as changes in buoyancy forces on the cage system. The variation in static tension on the mooring lines is typically re-mediated by elastic stretching of the mooring lines, but in severe cases a change in the mooring line configuration may be required. Progressive deterioration can occur in the mooring line material due to this process of repeated loading. Catastrophic damage is also likely to occur if the maximum tension exceeds the breaking strength of a line. To avoid this situation, mooring designers of offshore structures usually adopt a safety factor of 1.6... Read More →
NP

Nikhil Patil

Spatial Information Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Direction Relations for Two-Dimensional Objects | | Unlike directions between points, which have been well studied, models for directions between extended objects, such as polygons representing geographic entities i.e., countries or states, are less clearly understood. The potential complexity of polygons... Read More →
AP

Anthony Peterson

Computer Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Parking Detection Using Personal Mobile Devices | | Searching for an available parking space wastes precious time on a daily basis. We are researching the use of sensors found in smartphone devices to detect a user’s parking behavior. Our goal is to accurately measure parking... Read More →
RP

Robert Powell

Computer Science, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Automated Approach to Developing Description Logic Ontologies from First Order Logic | | With the amount of data collected everyday ever expanding, techniques for allowing computers to know what that data actually means are growing in importance. Ontologies are a tool to desc... Read More →
LZ

LONGHUAN ZHU

Civil Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Storm surge mitigation through kelp-type canopy | | Most of the coastline of the United States are vulnerable to the threat of the hurricanes. Associated with hurricanes, storm surge is the main risk to coastal communities. Mitigating storm surge has become a hot topic in coastal engineering. In this study, a 1D model was developed to analyze storm surge attenuation through an idealized kelp farm. The analytical solution provided promising results, indicating that kelp farms can reduce storm surge energy flux and set-up. There are two main factors that impact the storm surge energy flux reduction and set-up reduction, i.e., the ratio of the kelp farm induced drag to wind/bottom stress and the ratio of the hydrostatic pressure to wind/bottom stress. Generally, the kelp farm with larger size or density under larger wind speed and higher incident total water column height will enhance the capability of the kelp farm on storm surge attenuation. | | Faculty Mentor: Kimberly... Read More →

Judges
SB

Shawn Brackett

Engineering Physics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Integrated Environment & Proximity Sensing for UAV Applications | | As the realm of drone applications expand new methods for sensing, navigating and avoiding obstacles need to be developed. The project applies an Extended Kalman Filter to a simulated quadcopter vehicle though Matlab in order to estimate not only the vehicle state but the world state around the vehicle. The EKF takes in multiple sensor readings from range sensors, IMU sensors, and radiation sensors and combines this information to optimize state estimates. The result is an estimated world map to be used in vehicle navigation and obstacle avoidance. | The simulation handles the physics behind the vehicle flight. We know as a result of the motors there will be two primary forces acting on the vehicle, thrust and drag. These forces provide linear and rotational accelerations. These values can be integrated to determine vehicle flight path. This process determines the actual values of the vehicle state. Coupled into the integration process is the ability to tweak how fast the motors spin. Using this, A controller is built in to the vehicle such that desired vehicle states (position, velocity, and orientation) can be achieved. Additionally, sensing methods are simulated following known detection procedures and statistics to provide as accurate sensing models as possible. | The Extended Kalman Filter is used here due to some non-linear components of the estimation model. The estimation model includes the states for the vehicle, nearby world objects, nearby radiation measurements. By combining IMU and GPS data with additional measurement data for an EKF, an estimation method attempts to combine all three... Read More →
avatar for Rosemary Smith

Rosemary Smith

Faculty, UMAINE


Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Ballroom

9:15am

Student Round Table Presentations
Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Maxwell

Elisabeth Maxwell

Marine biology, marine policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Examining fishery co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s soft-shell clam fishery. The Maine soft-shell clam fishery is managed by a unique co-management system that involves shared governance between local communities and the state government... Read More →
avatar for Mackenzie Mazur

Mackenzie Mazur

Marine Biology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Round table examining fishery co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s lobster fishery | Maine’s co-managed American lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery is the most valuable commercial fishery in the state and persists as an important eco... Read More →
MM

Molly Miller

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Title: Round Table examining fisheries co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s intertidal aquaculture industry (Room 6 Presenter 3) | | The Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) utilizes Ostrom’s social-ecological systems framework to conduct research designed to improve and further develop aquaculture in Maine. Community-based intertidal aquaculture has the potential to diversify... Read More →
KO

Kimberly Ovitz

Marine Policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Round table examining fisheries co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s sea urchin fishery | | In the wake of overharvest and resulting trophic cascades, Maine’s marine ecosystems and harvester livelihoods face increasing vulnerability and... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 9:15am - 10:30am
Room 6

10:30am

Networking Break
Monday April 24, 2017 10:30am - 10:45am
Ballroom

10:45am

Exhibits/Performances – Arts
Speakers
avatar for Hannah Babcock

Hannah Babcock

Music Education, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Autism: A Song of Understanding is a musical composition inspired by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which summarizes the entire spectrum through three common categories of symptoms: language, social, and behavior. The piece consists of three movements from the perspective of the child and the fourth movement takes the... Read More →
AB

Aidan Bauer

New Media, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Escape: A Roguelite Stealth Experience | | Escape is a roguelite stealth game, a game with traditional 2D stealth gameplay that borrows elements from games of the roguelite genre, such as procedurally generated game environments and permadeath. No two playthroughs of Escape are exactly the same, and failure means you have start all over again. The goal is to put a twist on conventional stealth gameplay and create a challenging yet rewarding experience. | | Faculty Mentor: Jon... Read More →
DB

Destin Black

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Untitled | | My project explores the intersection of art and science to encourage viewers to look at art and data more carefully and critically. The project will contain diverse methodologies and mediums. The resulting work will produce a multi-media work for display. | | Faculty Mentor: Owen... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Courtright

Sarah Courtright

New Media, Studio Art, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Four Hellhounds Of The Apocalypse The Four Hellhounds of the Apocalypse (FHOTA) is a short, animated narrative. The subject is loosely based around the legend of the Four Horseman of the apocalypse. The story will consist of the elements of famine, pestilence, war, and death, though it will mostly focus on their faithful canine companions. The animation is intended to be around eight minutes long and will be hosted from a web page that contains more content meant to engage the viewer into searching deeper for the truths of the characters intentions and purposes. The way the animation plays out is in a way not meant to reveal everything at once. Their are things left unexplained. The roles of characters will seem to switch and you are left to wonder: who is the villain and who is the hero? FHOTA is meant to be projected both onto a sculpture and the wall behind it. Viewers are intended to interact with the website and enjoy the short film. The sculpture itself is a representation of an unnaturally formed tree from which the hounds are summoned and it will be from this tree that the story will be told through. I've created this animation through a mixture of methods. I begin with the classic style of frame by frame, hand drawn images in Adobe Photoshop. Some scenes I ended up transferring to After Effects where layers they are further manipulated into motion. | | Faculty Mentor: Jon... Read More →
JC

Josh Couturier

Intermedia MFA, 10:45AM-12:00PM
"Dimensions EP" | | The Dimensions EP is a CD/virtual EP that was constructed with collaborative media efforts and combines powerful sound poetry with rhythmic instrumental music to deliver statements about living in today's society as an adventuring millennial. (Warning Explicit Content) | | Faculty Mentor: Susan... Read More →
SG

Silvia Guzman

New Media, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Deconstructing Stereotypes To Create A More Aware Society | | The project’s aim is to deconstruct stereotypes and biases manufactured by the media and society by exposing people to existing stereotypes and prejudices to create a more conscious society. The project is a seven feet by four feet space in which a person is able to walk in and on the sides of the room are written stereotype pieces hanging off the top. The text in the pieces was created from responses given by people to this two questions: what is a stereotype or prejudice that... Read More →
KK

Kaylin Knott

Bachelors Degree in Music, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Music Therapy in Oncology | | In this research project, the use of music therapy in the field of oncology is explored. Music therapy has been in existence for many centuries, and is currently being used as a tool in cancer centers to help patients deal with their chemotherapy... Read More →
EM

Eric Morrison

New Media, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Virtual Rally | | To date, experience with Virtual Reality (VR) environments, though increasingly common, tend to limit a user’s opportunities for social interactions in a virtual world. When users don the required VR headset, brightly colored interactive 3D animations may induce, by design or inadvertently, a sense of social isolation. This project aims to provide a model for increasing a VR... Read More →
SN

Steve Norton

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
unintended consequences | | Unintended Consequences explores the collision between nature and human activity. | | Faculty Mentor: Nathaniel Aldrich 
AP

Adam Paul

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Reflections | | The research and artwork uses subversive techniques and combinations of digital media to question how people relate to their selves and others. It asks how and why we project social masks of ourselves and if these are different from our true reflections. | | Faculty Mentor: Owen... Read More →
AP

Amy Pierce

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cake Smash 2017 | | Contemporary American wedding culture is dominated by expectations of perfection. Perfection myths of bridehood are propagated by the wedding industry and voluntarily consumed and self-imposed by American brides. I am researching the prevalence and affects of a phenomenon, which I have coined... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Quiring

Amanda Quiring

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
1N73R3573D? | | The purpose of 1N73R3573D? is to explore changing mental focus and to encourage sitting with our thoughts, allowing them form and shape even if they may seem insignificant. The audience’s experience of my work feels like finding a locked journal on the ground, highlighting the tension between curiosity and secrecy. | | My method involved repeated paintings over the course of several months. During this time, I began to build up patterns and a meaningful language of shapes and symbols. The paintings incorporate... Read More →
VV

Virginia Valdes

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Target | | Video projection dealing with dettering animals from eating your garden as a metaphor for how some people deal with and think about the refugee crisis. | | Faculty Mentor: Owen Smith
JW

James Winters

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Drone with Graphic Activation for hurdy-gurdy and human beings. | | Drone with Graphic Activation for hurdy-gurdy and human beings. | By James Winters, studying Intermedial Musical Composition. | I am experimenting with musical composition. I reimagine the pedagogy (rules) and domain of Western Music though extended techniques that I invent for the hurdy gurdy. | On April 26th, or close to this date, I will form a gathering to see how these ideas play out in real life. Public will attend this recording session... Read More →

Judges
SL

Sara Lowden

Anthropology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ecuador's misappropriation of "buen vivir" This paper examines the epistemological tension surrounding the concept of "buen vivir" and its implications for the governance of natural resources in Ecuador. Rooted in Andean cosmology, "buen vivir" is an emergent philosophy akin to the degrowth movement that addresses the societal and ecological limitations of modern capitalism. This discourse analysis uses the lens of political ecology to investigate Ecuadorian President, Rafael Correa, and his political party's attempt to manipulate and institutionalize "buen vivir" in order to advocate industrial mineral extraction in concordance with the hegemonic extractivist model common throughout Latin America (Kauffman 2014). The analysis studies how Ecuador's constitution promotes responsible mining that respects the "rights of Nature" while in effect aggravating uneven social relations and increasing instability within mining zones (Vanhulst 2014). Interviews conducted in March 2016 in Zamora Province, a rural region near the southeastern border of Peru, reveal growing community opposition to large scale extraction of subsurface mining and document a failure to involve local stakeholders in participatory processes concerning extraction. Such exclusionary processes violate the central pillars of buen vivir and serve to reproduce the dominant growth discourse. References Kauffman, Craig M., and Pamela L. Martin 2014 Scaling Up Buen Vivir: Globalizing Local Environmental Governance from Ecuador. Global Environmental Politics 14(1):40-58. Vanhulst, Julien, and Adrian E. Beling 2014 Buen Vivir: Emergent Discourse within Or Beyond Sustainable Development? Ecological Economics 101:54-63. | | Faculty Mentor: Christine... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

10:45am

Exhibits/Performances – Biomedical Sciences
Speakers
FJ

Francesca J. Armstrong

Biochemistry, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Identification and Characterization of the Novel Mycobacteriophage Cuke | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect the genus Mycobacterium. Phage particles are the most numerous biological entities with an estimated population of 1031 individuals, yet to date only... Read More →
WA

Wyatt Austin

Biological Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Neuropathy Detection/Adipose Innervation | | Abstract | Proper neural innervation and activation in white and brown adipose tissues (WAT, BAT respectively) are essential for certain metabolic processes such as lipolysis, thermogenesis and adipogenesis. However, the exact mec... Read More →
KC

Kyle Capistrant-Fossa

Marine Science, Microbiology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Effect of CFTR Deficiency on Host Pathogen Interactions of Danio rerio and Pseudomonas aeruginosa | | Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene for the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein... Read More →
KC

Kaitlin Clark

Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Human Color Acuities Dramatically Depend Upon Specific Background Colors and Individual Subject Differences. | | Visual Acuity examinations are commonly used to perform tests for visual function within the medical field. Traditional VA charts, like the Snellen and Landolt C, are printed with a black opotype on a white background. However, these charts preclude study on the effects of different foreground and background color combinations on individual human visual acuity values. With advancements in technology, computers can be programed to test for these effects. Recent developments of the VISION program allow researchers to examine how visual acuities may depend upon specific combinations of foreground and background colors. Sensory Cyber Systems, LLC has created a suite of... Read More →
LH

Laura Horowitz

Microbiology, Biochemistry, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Role of Cellular Stress in JC Polyomavirus Infection | | The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) causes a life-long persistent infection in the kidneys in 50-80% of the population. However, in immunosuppressed hosts, JCPyV can spread to the central nervous system and cause the fatal disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The role of host immunity in controlling JCPyV infection during a persistent infection in the kidneys is not clearly understood. However, the cytokine interferon beta (IFN... Read More →
PD

Paul Dillon Kress

Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Diabetic Neuropathy | | Diabetes is a debilitating condition in which the body’s capability to react to or produce insulin is diminished, resulting in an altered metabolic state. This condition is often accompanied by comorbidities, such as peripheral neuropathy, which is def... Read More →
JM

Jessica Majors

Animal Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Haemonchus contortus in White-Tailed Deer: A Threat Assessment | | Haemonchus contortus (“Barber pole worm”, HC) is a parasitic nematode that poses an economic threat to sheep and goat producers (Sutherland et al., 2010; Westers et al., 2016). Anthelmintic drugs are becoming less effective as the worms develop resistance, and producers have turned to alternate strategies, including pasture rotation which involves moving sheep from one pasture to another, to prevent HC contamination. Sheep may not be the only source of HC infection, however. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) have been shown to carry HC, and HC of deer origin can be infective to sheep (McGhee et al., 1981). Between October 2015 and 2016, fecal samples from WTD were collected approximately weekly from deer beds in close proximity to sheep pastures at UMaine and tested for HC. Fecals were tested using modified... Read More →
HM

Hannah Morgan

Bioengineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Scratch Assay Device for Keratinocyte Wound Healing Studies | | Scratch assays are widely used in wound-healing studies, however, current methods, which use a pipette tip to create the scratch and a light microscope to determine the width of the scratch, do not have reproducible results. We have designed and built a device which creates scratches of a precise and repeatable width ranging from... Read More →
RT

Ryley Thompson

Microbiology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Determining Role of LytR Protein in Pathogenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae | | Streptococcus agalactiae is a bacterial pathogen that can exist in our normal microbiome, only causing disease when it gains access to certain tissues, or when it infects immunocompromised individuals. To find ways to combat these infections, it is important to determine the bacterial defenses which allow it to evade our immune responses. The cell envelope of S. agalactiae is important for many virulence functions, such as survival in the host environment and evading the host immune response. Because of the importance of the S. agalactiae capsule in the establishment of infection, we will be researching the function of two proteins, LytR and CpsA, which are part of a widespread class of proteins found in many Gram-positive bacterial species and are involved in cell envelope regulation and stability. Based on the role of LytR in regulation of the cell envelope, we hypothesize that the LytR protein plays a key role in the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. We will be investigating how the presence or absence of the protein affects the recruitment of immune cells in systemic and localized infections. To accomplish this, we will be injecting zebrafish larvae with S. agalactiae strains that have mutations in the lytR gene and observing the differences in mortality and in recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection, compared to injections with the wild type strain. Results from this study will provide new information on how the S. agalactiae cell envelope protects the bacteria from immune responses. | | Faculty Mentor: Melody... Read More →
JW

Jasmine Waite

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM
Determining gene expression profile changes in cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele infection (Section A Poster, 23  9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Mycobacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts, including pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-pathogenic M. smegmatis. Understanding phage-host interactions is important considering that pathogenic strains of Mycobacterium typically carry prophage. Prophage are latent phage genomes integrated into the host's DNA and are hypothesized to contribute to bacterial virulence or fitness. We are investigating the impact of cluster E phage lytic and lysogenic infection on host M. smegmatis. Mycobacteriophage possess diverse genomes, are abundant and ubiquitous, and much of their population remains to be explored and understood. Clusters are used to organize mycobacteriophage based upon genome similarity. While some clusters are well-characterized, the knowledge of Cluster E remains underdeveloped. The genome of Cluster E phage Ukulele was previously sequenced and annotated with some gene functions predicted. This provides insight to the biology of Ukulele, but fails to explore host response to viral infection. RNA sequencing addresses this gap in knowledge, through isolation and subsequent analysis of RNA samples at pre-, early and late lytic infection time points. Based on gene expression profiles in M. smegmatis infected by mycobacteriophage Giles, we expect that host gene expression will be altered. Particular genes that were affected, as well as the biological motivations for these changes, are being explored. | | Examining CFTR and CYP2C19 Mutations through Genetic Screening (Table 5 Side L, 10:45 AM-12:00PM) | | Response to drugs can vary by patient, which may require testing before an effective treatment can be administered. In addition to these delays, early diagnosis of genetic diseases is not always available. Genetic screening provides a solution for this gap in patient knowledge. Screening may detect mutations within genes required for the activation of drugs as well as those linked to genetic diseases. The CFTR and CYP2C19 genes were investigated as representations of the importance of genetic analysis. The CFTR gene is responsible for regulating chloride ion movement across cell membranes; the two mutations investigated were M470V and... Read More →

Judges
AH

Amalia Harrington

Marine Biology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Effects of ocean acidification on the physiology of subadult American lobsters (Homarus americanus) | | Increases in anthropogenic input of CO2 into the atmosphere has caused widespread patterns of ocean warming (OW) and ocean acidification (OA). Both processes will likely have major impacts on commercially important species, but OA may pose a particular threat to marine calcifying invertebrates. In the State of Maine, commercial fisheries landings are valued in excess of $600 million, the majority of which is sustained by the American lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery. Previous research explored the effects of OA and OW on larval lobsters, but little work has focused on subadult or adult stages. We present preliminary results of a short-term study exploring physiological impacts of OA on subadults. We used Honeywell Durafet pH electrodes in combination with a... Read More →
MN

Melody Neely

Faculty, UMaine
I study infectious diseases using a zebrafish model. My research interests include analysis of the interactions that occur between the host and pathogen during an infection. We examine this dynamic interaction in real time using microscopy of labeled bacteria and zebrafish immu... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

10:45am

Exhibits/Performances – Engineering
Speakers
avatar for Philip Bean

Philip Bean

Mechanical Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Modeling and Simulation of the Thermoforming Process in Thermoplastic Composite Materials Thermoplastic-matrix composite materials have unique advantages including faster processing, improved fracture-toughness, and recyclability. These and other benefits have caused increasing interest in the use of these materials in both aerospace and automotive industries. Due to the differences in behavior, these materials require a different type of manufacturing process to thermoset--matrix composites. This manufacturing process generally involves using pre-manufactured tape-layers. These layers, containing both thermoplastic-matrix and fiber-reinforcement, are aligned to the desired orientation, stacked up, they are then heated to the thermoplastic melting temperature in an oven and stamped to shape using a large press. Due to some complex behaviors in processing, however, it is necessary to simulate the forming process prior to manufacturing. Simulation can help to avoid costly trial-and-error type process tuning in order to avoid manufacturing defects. A research effort has been undertaken in order to streamline the process of material characterization toward simulation using commercially available software. This includes a variety of material tests, as well as forming tests in order to compare simulated results, such as predicted wrinkles and fiber reorientations in complex-shaped parts, to real parts manufactured under the same conditions as the simulations. | | Faculty Mentor: Roberto... Read More →
SB

Shawn Brackett

Engineering Physics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Integrated Environment & Proximity Sensing for UAV Applications | | As the realm of drone applications expand new methods for sensing, navigating and avoiding obstacles need to be developed. The project applies an Extended Kalman Filter to a simulated quadcopter vehicle though Matlab in order to estimate not only the vehicle state but the world state around the vehicle. The EKF takes in multiple sensor readings from range sensors, IMU sensors, and radiation sensors and combines this information to optimize state estimates. The result is an estimated world map to be used in vehicle navigation and obstacle avoidance. | The simulation handles the physics behind the vehicle flight. We know as a result of the motors there will be two primary forces acting on the vehicle, thrust and drag. These forces provide linear and rotational accelerations. These values can be integrated to determine vehicle flight path. This process determines the actual values of the vehicle state. Coupled into the integration process is the ability to tweak how fast the motors spin. Using this, A controller is built in to the vehicle such that desired vehicle states (position, velocity, and orientation) can be achieved. Additionally, sensing methods are simulated following known detection procedures and statistics to provide as accurate sensing models as possible. | The Extended Kalman Filter is used here due to some non-linear components of the estimation model. The estimation model includes the states for the vehicle, nearby world objects, nearby radiation measurements. By combining IMU and GPS data with additional measurement data for an EKF, an estimation method attempts to combine all three... Read More →
WB

William Breeding

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Photocatalysis of Atrazine by various Bismuth Oxyhalides: Rates, Mechanisms and Byproducts (Section F Poster 22, 1:00PM-2:15PM) | | Atrazine has been found to be one of the most prevalent pollutant in worldwide water systems. Typically a result of herbicide runoff, the harmful environmental impacts of the compound cause novel methods of treatment to gain interest, such as photocatalysis. Photocatalysis involves the addition of a catalyst and light source for enhanced degradation of pollutants, and offers an efficient method for atrazine treatment in water. Bismuth oxyhalides (BiOX) have previously been investigated by the Patterson Research Group as catalysts for the degradation of atrazine, as results have shown comparable degradation rates to EPA photocatalytic standards. BiOX compounds will be doped with various nonmetals in attempt to enhance photocatalytic activity. The goal of this project is to assess various BiOX based... Read More →
JC

Joel Castro

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Analysis of Wireless Leak Detection Aboard International Space Station | | Micrometeoriod and orbital debris (MMOD) impact is a constant and serious threat to space travel. MMOD travel at speeds fast enough to vaporize material on impact and even generate plasma. This leads to structural damage and more notably leaks - a serious issue for habitats in the vacuum of space or other extreme environments. Currently, leaks are detected when air pressure is dropped (too late) and localized by handheld tools (too tedious) in manual inspections. To ensure safety of the inhabitants, a faster, more sophisticated, and preferably automated method of leak detection is needed. A system to localize leaks using ultrasonic profiles and Bayesian inference algorithms was designed to address these needs. Prototype devices of this system were built, flight certified, and transported to the International Space Station (ISS) for in situ testing. During this test, the devices were placed in locations likely to naturally produce leaks in an attempt to verify the leak localization functions and to get a general profile of the acoustics present in the ISS. After a set of test runs, data from said runs were transmitted to ground for analysis. This analysis is the focus of this current work. Analysis methods include looking at the final location estimates, the spectrum of noise, and comparisons to previous tests including a set of tests done at the mockup of the ISS located in Houston, TX. | | Faculty Mentor: Ali... Read More →
avatar for Jason Dignan

Jason Dignan

New Media, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM
Stewart Motion Platform Redesign (Table 15 Side R, 10:45 AM-12:00PM) | | The University of Maine Virtual Environment and Multimodal Interaction Laboratory (VEMI Lab) houses a currently offline Stewart Motion Platform (SMP). The SMP is a synergistic parallel robot with six axes of movement. The platform is controlled with an Arduino Mega, which in turn is controlled by a PC computer using Python script and a Joystick. Repeated operating system updates over time have rendered the joystick drivers unusable, which in turn have affected the Python script. The proposed project consists in migrating the hardware to a new, durable format, involving reassembly of the control interfaces, and reprogramming. The setup will be reverse engineered and reassembled using 3D printing technologies, forming single-piece, solid, hardwired connections requiring no further modifications to conform to changing standards in computers. Specifically, platform-to-Arduino connections will be replaced with Cat5 cabling and connectors. Thereafter, Python scripted software will be redeveloped using Unity as a control system for the platform. Unity is a mainstream game development engine also used in research with the capacity to render real-time physics, making it highly useful in simulations. Additionally, Unity can interface with an Arduino using Serial Communications, making it an ideal environment for controlling the SMP. The restored platform will inform research design for current and future VEMI projects involving aging and spatial cognition, again and driving, gerontechnology, and the study of multi-level 2D and 3D cognitive maps and aspects of human-computer interaction. | | Project Haggis (Table 23 Side L, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | While peers may be invited to provide in-class verbal feedback or critique of student work, formal evaluation of student projects in traditional teacher-centric classrooms is usually reserved to the class instructor. Project Haggis proposes a technological mechanism for expanding formal feedback to include student-peer evaluations, providing quality, timely feedback while involving an entire class in the process of evaluating group projects and individual performance. Haggis offers a web-based service making peer feedback accessible in real time as evaluations are completed. Using an SQL database system and web browser, Haggis is a content management system in which data is captured, stored, and made visually available through built-in and user-formulated queries. APIs let students submit on-site evaluations of project work via smartphone. Students will be required to log on via web-browser to view compiled results and to submit individual performance evaluations. The pilot program will be applied to multiple project assignments within a single Spring 2017 course being offered at University of Maine. The underlying system is generically designed to support any number of courses and assignments within courses. The system could likewise be deployed to increase interactivity of an audience and with producers of materials, e.g. at science fairs or art shows, or with business/organization project teams. The... Read More →
AF

Aaron French

Mechancial Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Nanocellulose Insulation (Table 17 Side R) | | Much of the focus on energy in the modern age is how to produce energy efficiently and without the use of fossil fuels. However, a largely untapped idea that has been around for much longer is how to be more efficient using energy... Read More →
SL

Samuel Landry

Chemical Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Microfluidic mixer for studying nanoparticle formation | | Nanoparticles offer a novel technique for cancer treatment due to their programmable selectivity enabling effective drug delivery to oncogenic cells. Toxicity and permeation of nanoparticles is determined by particle... Read More →
VL

Vincent Lewis

Mechanical Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Head injury thresholds of high frequency vibrations using a hemispherical 3d-printed shell and a dielectric gel matrix. | | Mitigation of head injury due to vibration and accidental impact is important to astronauts, since the care for acute injuries is difficult in space. In this study, the functionality of accelerometer instrumentation when embedded into a gel matrix was studied and how this response compares to that of the relatively rigid test apparatus. A hemispherical 3d-printed shell was mounted with four tri-axial MEMS accelerometers and filled with a dielectric gel selected carefully to simulate the mechanical properties of the brain, then it was subjecting to a space shuttle launch simulation to analyze the acceleration response due to high frequency vibrations. Two different angles were used during the launch simulations, zero and 180 degrees, to capture the any angular acceleration that may occur. The acceleration data was then processed through MatLab to produce a range of head injury thresholds based on the Head Injury Criterion (HIC15) and the Brain Injury Criteria (BrIC). Accordingly, a space agency such as NASA will provide the most state of the art measures to mitigate this type of injury even high cost. In the past, impact and vibration studies have been conducted on head forms, such as the Hybrid III crash dummy head forms, to help predict the criteria of brain traumas and turmeric brain injuries, TBIs. While these techniques do have an immense amount of research and do help to predict injuries, they... Read More →
KM

Kayla Marquis

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Fast, Cheap, and Simple Device to Detect Red Blood Cell Rupture (Table 14 Side L, 10:45AM-12:00PM) | | When red blood cells rupture, free hemoglobin is released, resulting in severe health complications if not immediately detected. Traditional free hemoglobin detection methods r... Read More →
DM

Daniel Murray

Bioengineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Separation of C. Elegans via electrophoresis | | C. elegans has proved to be a useful model species for scientific research due to its short life cycle, small genome, and simple nervous structure. C. elegans experiences a series of six life stages during its normal developmen... Read More →
NR

Nathan Roscoe

Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
UMaine HIAD Senior Capstone Project | | NASA is actively developing the technology and capabilities required to send a human to Mars in the 2030’s. Large aero shells will be required to provide enough aerodynamic drag to decelerate and deliver large masses in an extremely thin atmosphere... Read More →
MW

Madeline Wehrle

Bioengineering,nanotechnology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Modification of Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay With Gold Nanoparticles. C. White, M. Chesley, M. Wehrle and E. McCormick. From University of Maine, Orono, Maine | | A SNAP® test is sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) diagnostic device manufactured by IDEXX laboratories. The... Read More →
AW

Abigail Weigang

Bioengineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Patterning of paper-based SLIPS for microfluidic analytical devices | | The development of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices has recently revolutionized medical diagnostics, serving as a healthcare solution in countries which lack the infrastructure and resources ne... Read More →
DW

Devin White

Mechanical Engineering, 10:45AM-12:00PM
2016-2017 UMaine Mechanical Engineering UAV Capstone | | The UMaine UAV Capstone team was tasked with developing a remote controlled aircraft which must carry 3 hockey pucks around a predetermined course. The aircraft must also be foldable so that it can be stored inside a tr... Read More →

Judges
avatar for Libby Gorse

Libby Gorse

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantifying aquaculture’s effect on nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface in the Damariscotta estuary in Maine The importance of developing a sustainable aquaculture industry has been realized in the state of Maine. An extensive, interdisciplinary EPSCoR-funded project by the name of SEANET (Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network) is spearheading research on aquaculture from all fronts to reduce the rising pressure placed on wild marine species by the demands of a growing global population. The work presented here involves the determination of the rate at which organic biodeposits resulting from bivalve aquaculture operations can safely be added to the underlying sediment, establishing the carrying capacity of the sediment with respect to aquaculture practice. We have designed flux chambers that hold intact sediment cores immersed in seawater, mimicking environmental conditions for the study of nutrient cycling and flux at the sediment-water interface. Three major hypotheses are tested: (1) biodeposits high in carbon and nitrogen content increase nutrient flux to the water column; (2) fine-grained sediments contain more organic matter and support lower mineralization rates of biodeposits than coarse-grained sediments; and (3) polychaetes lower the efflux of nutrients from the sediment. The Damariscotta estuary has been identified as a critical site to understand due to its suitability for aquaculture. The extrapolation of our data will help future aquaculturists and policy makers to make informed decisions. | | Faculty Mentor: Aria... Read More →
LK

Lydia Kifner

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Characterizing vernal pool biogeochemistry across a land use gradient in Maine, USA | | Vernal pools are small seasonal wetlands that are crucial for maintaining amphibian and reptile biodiversity in forests in northeastern North America. The pools’ sizes make them especially... Read More →
AM

Anin Maskay

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SAW Static Strain Sensor for High Temperature Applications | | The measurement of static strain in harsh environment, in particular at temperatures beyond 100ºC, is highly desirable in multiple applications such as power plants, industrial manufacturing, and aerospace. The aforementioned industries have a high demand for small, robust, stable sensors that can operate wirelessly, without a battery or power source, and require minimal maintenance for structural health monitoring and condition based maintenance. The technologies that currently exist face multiple challenges related to sensor endurance, size, complexity, and system integrability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology is a technology that has shown promise in a multitude of sensing applications because of its characteristics such as small size, ease of mass production, robustness, battery-free, and wireless capability. In this research work, SAW sensors fabricated using thin film fabrication techniques on langasite employing platinum alloy based electrodes have been exposed to temperatures up to... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

10:45am

Oral Presentations – Business
Speakers
KL

Kayla Leland

Business Management&Finance, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Why you should Travel to Uruguay | | Our booth will be all about the country of Uruguay and why one should travel there. We will have a lot of information involving the country and tourism. Our goal is to increase the leisurely travel to Uruguay because it is a beautiful comp... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Room 1

10:45am

Oral Presentations – Education
Speakers
BC

Brandon Clark

Mathematics, Physics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
ODE to Applied Physics: The Intellectual Pathway of Differential Equations in Mathematics and Physics Courses: Existing Curriculum and Proposed Instructional Strategies | | Research on the learning and teaching of STEM topics has traditionally focused on large-enrollment introductory courses. The National Academies recently recommended an increased focus on research beyond introductory courses as well as interdisciplinary efforts. Researchers in undergraduate mathematics education have put out a specific call to action for research in differential equations. In an attempt to show the interconnectedness of ideas in differential equations central to mathematics and physics, I am exploring the implementation of differential equations in mathematics and physics courses. Research on student learning suggests that to improve student understanding, educators should use multiple representations (i.e., analytical, graphical, numerical) in instruction. Students come from a variety of educational backgrounds; there is generally not one method of solution or representation that will satisfy each... Read More →
YI

Yarissa I. Ortiz-Vidal

PhD in Higher Education, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Pushing Boundaries and Redefining Cultural Wealth | | Latinos’ cultural wealth in the United States has been looked at from a perspective of deficit, one of cultural poverty and disadvantages. As the US Latino population continues to increase, so does the need to ensure this... Read More →
BT

Betsy Trenkman

Master of Science in Teaching, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Collaborating Across the University of Maine System to Improve Student Understanding of the Role of Energy and Matter in Photosynthesis | | A recent assessment of 715 undergraduate biology students from six campuses in the University of Maine System revealed that they struggle to understand the roles of nutrients, carbon dioxide, and light energy in plant growth and how rising levels of global atmospheric carbon dioxide are predicted to impact aspects of... Read More →
PW

Paul Wilson

Master of Science in Teaching, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Self-Efficacy of Secondary Teachers Regarding the Teaching of Energy Concepts | | Aside from having specialized and pedagogical content knowledge, successful teachers must also have a degree of self-efficacy in their ability to teach the subject matter. This presentation will describe how three middle school teachers working as a group were able to grow their self-efficacy by piecing together elements of their existing knowledge to form a coherent model for the Law of Conservation of Energy. This case study is based on an audio recording of these teachers taken during a professional development workshop. This was one of a series of workshops administered in the greater Bangor area in which secondary-level teachers completed a survey pertaining to energy concepts in physics. Over the course of the workshop, these three teachers experienced a significant improvement in self-efficacy with regard to their proficiency in the subject matter. We describe the process through which this transformation occurred. During the workshop, the three teachers were able to identify several crucial energy concepts, which they pieced together to form an operational definition of energy conservation over the course of answering the survey. At one point, these... Read More →

Session Chair
BT

Betsy Trenkman

Master of Science in Teaching, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Collaborating Across the University of Maine System to Improve Student Understanding of the Role of Energy and Matter in Photosynthesis | | A recent assessment of 715 undergraduate biology students from six campuses in the University of Maine System revealed that they struggle to understand the roles of nutrients, carbon dioxide, and light energy in plant growth and how rising levels of global atmospheric carbon dioxide are predicted to impact aspects of... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Room 1

10:45am

Oral Presentations – Natural Sciences
Speakers
AB

Amy Baron

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, School of Biology and Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Bird Abundance in the Rockweed Habitat along the Maine Coast | | Along the Maine coast, rockweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) is the dominant primary producers in the sheltered rocky intertidal areas and provides many essential ecological services to the intertidal ecosystem. Rockweed biomass supports organisms through direct grazing and additions to the detrital food web. Its complex three-dimensional structure not only provides invertebrates with protection from heat, desiccation, and predation at low tide but also a predation refuge for juvenile fishes. Moreover, rockweed provides habitat and a foraging site for coastal birds, such as Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), which forage for invertebrates in the expanded floating canopy. A strong linkage between rockweed and marine invertebrates has been shown; however, less is known about the ecological values of rockweed habitats to vertebrates, particularly birds. To understand the importance of rockweed for coastal birds, I conducted bird and algae surveys along the entire coast of Maine between June and September 2016. Bird counts were modeled as a function of the species composition of the macroalgal community (i.e., rockweed Ascophyllum nodosum versus other macroalgal species such as Fucus spp., bare rock or other substrates), geographic region, shoreline exposure, wind and wave conditions, precipitation, calendar day, and tidal cycle. On average, bird use of the intertidal zone was higher in areas with greater coverage of rockweed. These results may have implications for the ecological effects of rockweed harvest for commercial use. | | Faculty Mentor: Brian... Read More →
RB

Robert Boenish

Marine Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Dynamics of effective effort in a dynamic trap fishery: Maine American lobster (Homarus americanus) Utilization and interpretation of fishery-dependent data presents issues due to statistical difficulties associated with non-random sampling. A standardized framework is developed in this study for estimating Maine, USA, American Lobster (Homarus americanus) effective effort (individual trap hauls) on a fixed spatiotemporal scale using fishery-dependent data. We employ environmental covariates in a two-stage generalized additive model framework and non-parametrically bootstrap to standardize lobster catch per unit effort (CPUE) and estimate confidence intervals for the years 2006-2013. Bootstrapped CPUE confidence intervals are combined with high resolution landings data to estimate confidence intervals of effective lobster effort. In all study years we found the peak of effective effort preceded the peak of landings. Coast-wide from 2006-2013, effective effort increased modestly (9.1%) while landings increased dramatically (69.6%), suggesting assessment of spatiotemporal fishery dynamics may provide important insights for future management in Maine. Characteristic east-west differences in catch and effort were present in all study years, further suggesting non-stationarity of biological, temporal, and geographic processes in the Maine Lobster fishery. | | Faculty Mentor: Yong... Read More →
AB

Adrianus Both

Marine Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Sourcing and evaluating detritus as a supplemental diet for bivalve aquaculture using stable isotopes and fatty acids biomarkers | | Conventional bivalve aquaculture relies on areas with high natural abundances of phytoplankton to be successful. Since bivalves are known to ingest detritus, the question arises; Can detritus supplement bivalve growth and expand sustainable site selection of aquaculture? To address this question the contribution of nearshore primary producers to the detrital pool of a temperate estuary-bay system and the diet of Mytilus edulis was determined using 14C and 15N stable isotopes along with fatty acid biomarkers. Sampling occurred every two weeks from May until November 2016 across six sites throughout Saco Bay, Maine. Samples were collected with vertical tows and fractionated into... Read More →
ZC

Zakkary Castonguay

Food Science and Human Nutrition, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Phytonutrient Assessment of Locally Grown Cold Hardy Plum Cultivars | | Prunus salicina Lindl., stone fruits more commonly known as the Japanese plum are naturally rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Locally grown plums can be a healthful, low-calorie snack option for consumers. Maine agriculturalists stand to benefit from the seasonal availability of cold hardy plum cultivars. Phytochemical constituents were extracted using acidified methanol for eight, locally grown, cold hardy plum cultivars at two stages of ripeness (n=15). Cultivars were first allowed to ripen on the tree before harvest (tree ripe), and the second harvested prematurely similar to that of commercial practices (mature). Total monomeric anthocyanin, ascorbic acid (AA), total phenolics, and free radical scavenging ability were measured. Spring Satin tree ripe had the greatest anthocyanin content (301.71... Read More →
KC

Kate Coupland

Oceanography, 10:45AM-12:00PM
What's controlling pH in the Damariscotta River? | | As climate change continues to alter marine ecosystems through temperature and salinity changes, acidification, and sea level rise, understanding how the estuaries and aquaculture may respond to these changes is critical to sustainable management. The Damariscotta River is the highest producer of oysters annually in Maine. Understanding this system is paramount to expand aquaculture throughout the state to meet the needs of a growing population and support coastal communities. We are developing a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model of the Damariscotta River that will focus on understanding why the Damariscotta River is such a productive oyster aquaculture area. The model will incorporate parameters such as temperature and salinity, nutrient sources, fresh water flow, primary productivity rates, chlorophyll a standing stock, uptake rates by oysters, proportion of food coming from detritus vs phytoplankton, benthic pelagic coupling and remineralization rates, bottom type, and bathymetry. Several questions of interest to be answered with the model include: What is the carrying capacity of the Damariscotta River for oysters? How does the composition of detritus in the river impact oyster growth rates, and what are the possibly implications due to shift in detritus composition? Increased temperature will likely increase oyster growth rates, will the oyster food supply increase proportionately? Will shelf intrusion of acidic water be of concern for the growing areas in the upper portions of the river? Will decreased pH due to increased freshwater runoff have an impact on growth rates? | | Faculty Mentor: Damian... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Curtis

Caroline Curtis

Biology, Neuroscience Minor, 10:45AM-12:00PM
mTERT as a Novel and Unique Marker for Adult Neural Stem Cells Neurodegeneration and brain injuries are incurable problems that stem from the death of neurons, without replacement. One potential avenue of treatment could be stimulation of adult neural stem cells (ANSCs), but at present these cells are difficult to study due to non-specific markers. Our research is focused on investigating mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase (mTERT) as a novel and unique marker for ANSCs... Read More →
SD

Samantha Davis

Wildlife Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Seasonal survival and harvest rates of ruffed grouse in central Maine, USA | | Individual survival is a fundamental component of population dynamics, and knowledge of factors that influence survival is important for understanding fluctuations that occur within populations. Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is considered generally abundant in Maine, but along their southern range margin and in parts of New England their populations have experienced long-term declines. Our objectives for this study were to estimate rates of survival and harvest of radio-marked ruffed grouse in central Maine and evaluate sources of temporal (annual, monthly, seasonal, and weekly), spatial, and individual (age, sex, and body condition) variation on survival. We estimated a cumulative harvest rate of 0.134... Read More →
AE

Amber Elwell

Food Science and Human Nutrition, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Consumer Acceptability of Cold Hardy Plums | | Did you know that the State of Maine’s population increases by over 30 million people during the tourist season? This influx of people provides an increase in revenue through all areas of the economy during summer months, which can be beneficial to agriculture and local Maine farmers. Currently, apple orchards are popular in Maine, however there is potential to grow cold hardy plums that survive in... Read More →
AG

Andrew Galimberti

Entomology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Mineral Oil as a Tool in Integrated Pest Management of Potato | | Mineral oil is an organic petroleum-based pesticide which has a variety of uses in pest management. It has been used as an insecticide in several crops, primarily against small, soft-bodied insects. It is also... Read More →
AG

Amanda Gavin

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Linking climate variability to population wide increases of dissolved organic carbon in acid-sensitive high elevation lakes | | Porous cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) based aerogels are capable of absorbing and storing a significant amount of liquid inside the 3D structure. As the porosity of the CNF aerogels goes higher, the amount of liquid absorption increases linearly. One of the biggest problems of 3D CNF aerogels with high porosity is that the structure breaks down very rapidly in aqueous environments. Here we describe a method to overcome this deficiency by adding methacrylate functionalized carboxymethyl cellulose (MetCMC) into the CNF system followed by crosslinking between the methacrylate groups of MetCMC. The resultant polymer composite matrix successfully maintains a robust 3D structure without collapsing when rewetted and stored in aqueous environments. When rewetted CNF-MetCMC composite is freeze dried it maintains its size and shape whereas air drying causes shrinkage of the volume. Air dried CNF-MetCMC swells and increases in volume to some extent when rewetted. A greater mass fraction of CNF in the whole composition stabilizes the air dried structure against swelling in an aqueous environment. Cross-linking between methacrylate groups enhances the dry and wet modulus of CNF-MetCMC aerogels | | Faculty Mentor: Sarah... Read More →
AG

Andrew Goode

Oceanography, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Implications of expanding thermal habitat to settlement-based forecasts of American lobster landings | | The American lobster, Homarus americanus, fishery is the most valuable single-species fishery in the USA and Canada, and more than 90% of the USA share comes from the Gulf of Maine (GoM). New recruits to the fishery comprise approximately 85% of annual landings, and therefore landings are a reasonable indicator of the productivity of the fishery. The American Lobster Settlement Index (ALSI) was established in 1989 to record the interannual variability and overall trends in year class strength at the time larvae settle to the seabed, some 6-9 years before they enter the fishery. Widespread recent downturns in GoM settlement densities, as measured at shallow water monitoring sites, have raised concerns over future declines in landings. However, it is possible that the ALSI alone may underestimate year class strength if the area of suitable nursery habitat has expanded in a warming climate. Previous studies indicate lobster larvae prefer to settle where temperatures exceed... Read More →
SH

Savannah Haines

Forestry, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Fungi and tree response: Determining how the fungal pathogen, Caliciopsis pinea is altering eastern white pine compartmentalization. | | Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is historically, ecologically, and economically significant in both Maine and New Hampshire. Not only used commercially, for building and shipping products, white pine also plays a larger role as a valued habitat and food source for many wildlife species. Recently, reports of damage are being associated with the native fungal pathogen, Caliciopsis pinea. This pathogen has been rarely researched so little information is available. Knowing more about this pathogen and about the... Read More →
MN

Mohammed Nayeem Ibnul

Chemistry, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Fabrication of Thermoelectric Film of Bismuth Telluride Nanocomposites for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Generators | | Fabrication of Thermoelectric Film of Bismuth Telluride Nanocomposites for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Generators | | Mohammed Nayeem Ibnul | Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology (LASST) | University of Maine | | Abstract | Thermoelectric devices have attracted much interest for converting waste heat from engines into useful electricity. This particular technology is crucial for... Read More →
JI

Jonas Insinga

Entomology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Insects as potential vectors of Dickeya dianthicola in Maine potato agrosystems | | Maine makes on average $300 million annually from its potato. A new bacterial pathogen, Dickeya dianthicola, has been introduced to the state and has spread to neighboring states through trade in seed potatoes. A virulent causal agent of blackleg and aerial stem rot, contaminated soil and water are two avenues of spread for this bacterium in fields. However, there is also some evidence suggesting a coevolutionary relationship between pectolytic erwiniae bacteria and certain insects. There is thus a need to evaluate the potential for insect pests to serve as vectors of D. dianthicola. Focusing on the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decimlineata) and the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), we are conducting three different experiments: olfactometery involving the fermentative Dickeya-metabolite 2,3-butanediol, direct plant-to-plant transmission mediated by the previously mentioned insect species, and a field test to determine if implementation of different targeted pest management methods can influence D. dianthicola transmission rates. The determination of the viability of this route of Dickeya dispersal is of value by providing a potential target for efforts to reduce the transmission of a damaging agricultural disease currently impacting one of... Read More →
BK

Bouhee Kang

Food Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Recovery of functional proteins from invasive green crabs (Carcinus maenas) by isoelectric solubilization/precipitation | | Growing populations of invasive green crabs (Carcinus maenas) have negatively affected marine habitat, molluscan aquaculture, and commercially important fisheries in North America. The primary objective of this study is to create value added products from green crabs, which have no commercial value, focusing on protein ingredients for human foods. Homogenized green crab was solubilized at pH 2 (PP2) and pH 10 (PP10) for 30 min, and the supernatant pH was readjusted to 5.5 after centrifugation. The samples were centrifuged again to precipitate and isolate proteins which were then freeze-dried. Then, proximate composition and molecular weight (MW) distribution of samples were investigated. As a result of ISP processing, protein and lipid contents were increased, and mineral contents were lowered. PP2 samples contained larger MW proteins as compared to PP10. To determine the potential use of the protein isolate powders as functional food additives, their solubility, gelation, and emulsifying properties were evaluated. At pH 7 and pH 8, solubility of PP10 was significantly higher, 13% and 41%, compared to solubility of PP2, 3% and 6%, respectively. For gel formation, PP2 required a lower concentration (12%) than PP10 (21%). Emulsifying activity of PP10 (1480 m2/g) was improved significantly compared to PP2 (858 m2/g). These results indicate that the functional properties of the green crab protein isolates depend on pH during the solubilization stage and on MW distribution. | | Faculty Mentor: Denise Skonbergk Angela... Read More →
AL

Amy Lamore

Molecular and Cellular Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Comparison of Clearing Methods to Visualize Diabetic Neuropathy in BTBR Ob/Ob Mice | | Clearing methods are used to render a tissue completely transparent by removing the light scattering lipids. Many of these methods have been optimized for mouse brains, the fattiest organ i... Read More →
TL

Trevor Lessard

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Understanding Ecosystem Changes in the Falkland Islands Across Time | | The Falkland Islands are a biodiversity hot spot with endemic species of plants and animals, and a unique assemblage of seabirds and marine mammals that are threatened by land use practices and climate change. To understand how the abundances of marine fauna on the Falkland Islands compare to past abundances, we use sediment records to understand how the landscape and relative abundance of marine fauna populations breeding in the Falkland Islands changed over thousands of years. We specifically use bioelemental analysis of seventeen metals which are known to biologically accumulate in the tissue of top predators, and are deposited on their breeding grounds. | | Using two sediment cores collected at Surf Bay and Kidney Island, we determined changes in organic matter in the records over the past 13,000 years using a method called loss on ignition. A total of 1,009 peat samples (Surf Bay, n=477 samples; Kidney Island, n=532 samples) were baked at... Read More →
JM

Joelle Manglinckx

Wildlife Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Reproductive status affects summertime resource selection and survival of ruffed grouse in Maine, USA. | | Theory suggests that animals should select resources based on perceived fitness benefits. Because life-history traits differentially contribute to fitness and are constrained by reproductive costs, they require different resources; therefore, resource selection is a life-stage-specific process. To understand the relationship between life-stage-specific resource selection and the cost of brood-rearing to ruffed grouse, we investigated multi-level resource selection and its effects on summer survival of 50 individual non-reproductive and brood-rearing ruffed grouse in Maine, USA. At the landscape-level, non-reproductive ruffed grouse selected areas with greater stem densities... Read More →
DN

Dhriti Nayyar

Food Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Effects of blanching and freezing on antioxidant capacity of dulse (Palmaria palamata), gracilaria (Gracilaria tikvahiae), sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) and winged kelp (Alaria esculenta) | | A lot of attention has been given to analyzing antioxidants present in sea vegetables, focusing on dried products. Sea vegetable producers are now marketing minimally processed sea vegetable products including fresh and frozen salads... Read More →
MP

Margaret Pickoff

Plant, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Improving Green Manure Intercropping in Small Grains: An Evaluation of Alternative Termination Techniques | | The practice of intercropping small grains with leguminous green manures (GMs) can provide an affordable, on-farm source of nitrogen (N) for subsequent grain crops wh... Read More →
RR

Rebecca Rivernider

Zoology, Animal Science minor, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Timothy grass, a pollen forage for Bumble bees | | Bumble bees in Maine, USA were surveyed during the spring, summer, and fall of 2016 in the major geographic regions in the state to assess bumble bee health, diversity, and the flora that they visit to acquire food. During the survey we observed bumble bee workers visiting the introduced livestock forage grass, Timothy grass, Phleum pratense L. A review of the literature suggests that this plant species has rarely been observed as bumble bee forage. Photography was used to document this new forage plant association. Analysis of pollen extracted from foraging bumble bees suggests that the plant is significantly utilized with almost three-times as much timothy grass pollen as other pollen species being represented in the pollen collection (P = 0.002). Since Timothy grass is commonly found in commercial pasture seed mixes , grass pastures in North America may provide important pollen for bumble bee communities. | | Faculty Mentor: Eric... Read More →
KT

Kisei Tanaka

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Mesoscale climatic impacts on distribution of Homarus americanus in the US inshore Gulf of Maine. The American lobster (Homarus americanus) supports commercially valuable fisheries throughout the northeastern USA and the Canadian Maritime Provinces. Climate change is speculated to exert a dominant control over the... Read More →
JW

Jonathan Watson

Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Dam Removal and Fish Passage Improvement Influence Fish Assemblages in the Penobscot River, Maine | | Dams and their impoundments disrupt river habitat connectivity to the detriment of diadromous fishes. Removal of dams is assumed to improve riverine connectivity and lotic habitat for the benefit of anadromous fishes and fluvial specialists, but this is infrequently tested. Restoration efforts on the Penobscot River (Maine, USA) are among the largest recently completed in the United States, and include the removal of the two lower-most dams and improvements to fish passage at remaining barriers. We assessed fish assemblages in the mainstem river and several major tributaries before (2010-2012) and after dam removal (2014-2015) using boat electrofishing surveys and a stratified-random sampling design. Similarity indices suggest that the most pronounced changes in fish assemblage composition occurred in strata that underwent both habitat and connectivity changes (i.e. directly above removed dams). We found all anadromous species in greatest abundance below lower-most dam during each respective sampling period. River herrings Alosa spp. passed through the new fish elevator at the new lower-most dam and spawned in newly available habitat upstream. We also observed a marked reduction in lacustrine species in former impoundments (e.g. Pumpkinseed Sunfish Lepomis gibbosus and Golden Shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas) and a reduction in the relative abundance of Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu, an invasive habitat generalist that typically dominates the assemblage in most reaches. Our results demonstrate the potential for large dam removal projects to restore both fluvial and anadromous fish assemblages. | | Faculty Mentor: Stephen... Read More →

Session Chair
SD

Samantha Davis

Wildlife Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Seasonal survival and harvest rates of ruffed grouse in central Maine, USA | | Individual survival is a fundamental component of population dynamics, and knowledge of factors that influence survival is important for understanding fluctuations that occur within populations. Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is considered generally abundant in Maine, but along their southern range margin and in parts of New England their populations have experienced long-term declines. Our objectives for this study were to estimate rates of survival and harvest of radio-marked ruffed grouse in central Maine and evaluate sources of temporal (annual, monthly, seasonal, and weekly), spatial, and individual (age, sex, and body condition) variation on survival. We estimated a cumulative harvest rate of 0.134... Read More →
JI

Jonas Insinga

Entomology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Insects as potential vectors of Dickeya dianthicola in Maine potato agrosystems | | Maine makes on average $300 million annually from its potato. A new bacterial pathogen, Dickeya dianthicola, has been introduced to the state and has spread to neighboring states through trade in seed potatoes. A virulent causal agent of blackleg and aerial stem rot, contaminated soil and water are two avenues of spread for this bacterium in fields. However, there is also some evidence suggesting a coevolutionary relationship between pectolytic erwiniae bacteria and certain insects. There is thus a need to evaluate the potential for insect pests to serve as vectors of D. dianthicola. Focusing on the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decimlineata) and the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), we are conducting three different experiments: olfactometery involving the fermentative Dickeya-metabolite 2,3-butanediol, direct plant-to-plant transmission mediated by the previously mentioned insect species, and a field test to determine if implementation of different targeted pest management methods can influence D. dianthicola transmission rates. The determination of the viability of this route of Dickeya dispersal is of value by providing a potential target for efforts to reduce the transmission of a damaging agricultural disease currently impacting one of... Read More →
AL

Amy Lamore

Molecular and Cellular Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Comparison of Clearing Methods to Visualize Diabetic Neuropathy in BTBR Ob/Ob Mice | | Clearing methods are used to render a tissue completely transparent by removing the light scattering lipids. Many of these methods have been optimized for mouse brains, the fattiest organ i... Read More →
JM

Joelle Manglinckx

Wildlife Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Reproductive status affects summertime resource selection and survival of ruffed grouse in Maine, USA. | | Theory suggests that animals should select resources based on perceived fitness benefits. Because life-history traits differentially contribute to fitness and are constrained by reproductive costs, they require different resources; therefore, resource selection is a life-stage-specific process. To understand the relationship between life-stage-specific resource selection and the cost of brood-rearing to ruffed grouse, we investigated multi-level resource selection and its effects on summer survival of 50 individual non-reproductive and brood-rearing ruffed grouse in Maine, USA. At the landscape-level, non-reproductive ruffed grouse selected areas with greater stem densities... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Rooms 2-6

10:45am

Poster Presentations – Allied Health
Speakers
KC

Karyn Carlin

Nursing, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Preventing Hospital Readmission Rates with Individualized Patient Teaching Strategies | | | Topic and Purpose | ● As the rate of preventable hospital readmissions continues to rise, the need for patient centered education has become increasingly evident. Preventable readmissions monopolize nursing resources and exert a large economical strain on the healthcare system as a whole. In fact, Medicare has recently spent over $17 billion in unexpected and preventable readmission costs (Zuckerman, Sheingold, Orav, Ruhter... Read More →
LD

Lauren Doak

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Effect of Nutrition on Language Development in Preterm Infants | | This literature review looks at how early nutrition in premature infants affects later language development. This paper researches the feeding disorders common among premature infants and how they impair premature... Read More →
SF

Sarah Ford

Nursing, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Effects of Nurse Residency Programs on New Graduate Job Satisfaction (Section B Poster 36) | | During the first two years of post graduate employment, the turnover rate for newly licensed nurses is 33.5%, with high reports of job dissatisfaction (Kovner, Brewer, Fatehi, & Jun, 2014). This high turnover rate negatively affects patient care, is a large contributor to the current nurse shortage, and is costly for hospitals (Nursing Solutions, Inc., 2016). In an effort to combat this, hospitals across the country have implemented nurse residency programs (NRP). These programs utilize evidence based curriculums to enhance new nurses competencies in the areas of leadership, professional development, and patient safety. The purpose of... Read More →
JH

Jill Hamm

Communication Sciences and Disorders, Child Development and Family Relations, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Perceptions and Practices of Speech and Language Therapy: A Global Perspective | | Today, speech-language therapy can be delivered in many ways, for the purposes of this literature review and proposed study the family-centered approach to speech-language therapy will be explo... Read More →
BH

Brandon Howlett

Nursing, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Ventilator Associated Pneumonia Prevention: Traditional Versus Novel Means | | Ventilator associated pneumonia is defined as pneumonia that occurs more than 48 hours after the patient is placed on a ventilator (Koenig 2006). When a patient is on a ventilator, one of the most significant health threats is ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), which has an estimated mortality rate of up to 50%. The purpose of this review of the literature is to identify modifiable risk factors and preventative measures that can reduce the incidence of VAP. A search of the electronic databases CINAHL, Medline and PubMed from the years 2000 to present using the keywords... Read More →
KQ

Katarina Querfurth

Nursing, 10:45AM-12:00PM
For hospitalized in-patients , what evidence-based interventions will reduce the feelings of stress, anxiety and/or fear brought on by the hospital environment? | | Topic and Purpose: Patients often times experience a great deal of increased anxiety and stress while in the hospital setting. Not only can this be detrimental the patient satisfaction scores in a particular hospital but it can also hinder the healing process of the patient (Mandel, Davis... Read More →
CS

Clelia Sigaud

School Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Special Health Needs: Transitioning to Adult Primary Care | | The transition from pediatric to adult primary care can be a difficult and/or delayed process for patients with special health care needs. The following study sought to gather preliminary data regarding the state of transitional services for young adult patients in the state of Maine with special healthcare needs. Data was gathered via email and phone surveys, with the goal of gathering answers to the following questions (1) what proportion of respondents/practices provided primary care to children with special healthcare needs, (2) what proportion utilised a care coordinator/nurse navigator on either a full or part time basis, (3) whether the provider/practice had a formal transition protocol in place for transitioning patients with special needs to adult care, and (4) what kinds of supports would be most useful to providers to developing transition protocols. This information was sought with a view towards broadening understanding of the nature of transitional services, or lack thereof, in Maine, and a better conceptualization of how to best allocate resources intended to support providers in offering transition planning services to their patients with special healthcare needs. Although it is too early in the research process to draw conclusions and develop recommendations, the data gathered will be used to formulate recommendations regarding how best to maximize the care coordination role and support providers in developing formal transition protocols for their practice. | | Faculty Mentor: Alan... Read More →
JW

Jessica Wood

Nursing, 10:45AM-12:00PM
ICU Staffing Ratios and Patient Outcomes | | A Review of the Literature on High Nurse to Patient Ratios and Adverse Patient Outcomes | Becky Julian, Sally Peckenham, Ashlee Sargent, and Jessica Wood | P = Patients hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs) | I = Lower nurse-to-patient ratios | C = Higher nurse-to-patient ratios | O = Patient outcomes | Topic and Purpose: | Appropriate nurse staffing in the hospital setting is a growing problem that has the potential to adversely affect patient outcomes. A 2013 article in International journal of Nursing Studies reports that staffing with a reduced number of patients per nurse results in better outcomes and fewer patient complications. West, Barron, Harrison, Rafferty, Rowan... Read More →

Judges
LA

Linda Archambault

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Zebrafish Mucosal Infection Model Illuminates Host-Pathogen Interactions During Yeast Infection. | | Yeasts are part of the healthy microbiome of human gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts but can cause invasive and systemic disease in immunocompromised patients. Two species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis, account for the majority of hospital-acquired yeast infections. While C. albicans has long been the subject of research, relatively little is known about host-pathogen interactions involving C. parapsilosis. | The zebrafish immune system is remarkably like our own and their see-through larvae allow for intimately detailed monitoring of pathogen and host cell interactions using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. To better understand how epithelial tissues and innate immune cells interact with Candida species, we investigated aspects of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis mucosal infection in the zebrafish... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

10:45am

Poster Presentations – Social Sciences
Speakers
LA

Laura Andrews

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Anxiety in Young Adulthood: The Role of Attachment, Romantic Relationship Conflict, and Social Support Satisfaction | | Qualities of insecure attachment have been linked with the development of internalizing problems in childhood and adulthood (Sroufe, 2005). Research has also indicated that relationship qualities (i.e., conflict, support) are associated with anxiety symptoms (LaGreca... Read More →
avatar for J. Ross Anthony

J. Ross Anthony

Resource Economics and Policy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Taking the risk: factors influencing citizen risk perception under beach and shellfish advisories and closures | | Maine and New Hampshire’s coastal zone is an important driver of both states’ economies and is a key quality of life factor. Coastal water quality may be threatened by natural and human process; it is important to understand how coastal water users perceive the risk to human health associated with these threats. Enhanced understanding of risk perception may inform safety information disclosures for both beach-goers and shellfish consumers. I use data collected by the New England Sustainability... Read More →
AB

Abby Bellefleur

Communication, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Mental Health and the Media: Exploring the Relationship between TV Viewing Habits and College Students' Attitudes toward Mental Health | | Cultivation analysis research suggests that television viewing habits affect one’s view of the world (Gerbner, Gross, Morgan, Signorielli... Read More →
EB

Emily Blackwood

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
A study of volcanic activity and its impact on human health and cultural evolution | | Volcanoes have been erupting long before the evolution of modern humans on our planet. Their destructive forces have the potential to decimate surrounding landscapes, permanently or tempora... Read More →
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Ariel Bouchard

Psychology, Minor in Neuroscience and Pre-medical studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Sleep Parameters as a Contributing Factor in the Detection of MCI | | Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), as prodromal to AD, are the leading causes of cognitive loss in the aging community. Cognitive decline in this population has long been associat... Read More →
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William Brayden

Resource Economics & Policy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Assessing Consumer Preferences for Seafood Labels: the Role of Origin and Certification on Aquaculture-Raised Shellfish and Seaweed | | The production of seaweed and bivalve shellfish represents a substantial and growing sector of the U.S. seafood industry (NOAA, 2016; Watson, 2016). Although consumers may be purchasing more seafood, they still experience confusion during the process. Often, there are too many seafood attributes, some of which seem unclear. Meanwhile, producers must attempt to determine optimal methods for growing, harvesting, and marketing their products to maximize profits. Seafood labels thus play a crucial role in allowing producers to highlight their... Read More →
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Christopher Carey

Psychology/Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
An investigation of the impact of different types of category representations on decision making | | Categorization is an essential cognitive process that can increase the efficiency of decision making. For instance, categorization training increases the fidelity of category representations, enhancing the ability to make fine discriminations. Category representations are argued to contain within-category information (similarities among group members, e.g., category... Read More →
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Arianna Castonguay

Economics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Working While in College: The Trade-off Between Working and Studying | | When students devote time to working, they make trade offs and choose to spend less time doing things like schoolwork. Does this trade off between time spent working and time spent studying negatively impact academic performances? The objective of this research is to determine if a relationship exists between hours worked and graduation rates. That is, is there a correlation between how many hours a student works and his or her likeliness to succeed in college? | | Previous research regarding the effects working has on... Read More →
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Jaimi Clifford

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Flippin' Our Brains: Disability Benefits Everyone | | Disability is often thought of as an object in need of change. Accordingly, products designed for disabled populations aim to improve function and help individuals adapt to their environments. Curiously and often unrecognized, product designed for the atypical and extreme human often find their way into mainstream use, improving the world for everyone. This presentation details and analyzes the process of disability product to commercial success. We illustrate the... Read More →
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Heather Cross

Psychology, Sociology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Effects of Video Games and Religious Reminders on Prosociality | | This research aims to assess whether religious prosocial reminders and prosocial video games can work together to increase helping intentions and behaviors. Participants came into the lab to play either a prosocial or a neutral video game that had been framed with either religiously prosocial or nonreligious quotes. They were asked to read and explain the meaning behind three passages that were either religious or neutral, and told to keep the passages that they read in mind as they played a game. They were randomly assigned to play either a prosocial or neutral video game for 15 minutes. After completing gameplay, participants were asked if they were willing to volunteer at a local bottle drive. We recorded their intentions to help, and whether or not they followed through with those intentions. We expect to find that prosocial video games and religious reminders can work together to increase prosocial intentions and behaviors. | | Faculty Mentor: Jordan... Read More →
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Katrina Daigle

Psychological Sciences, Neuroscience, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Sleep as a Biobehavioral Marker of Cognitive Decline in Aging Individuals | | Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a prelude to more serious cognitive loss associated with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and is associated with sleep fragmentation and sleep loss. Previous studi... Read More →
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Lindsey Dale

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Assessing Older Adult Preferences for Novel Adult Day Camp Programming | | The UMaine Center on Aging conducted a mixed methods assessment of the interest and programming requests for an older adult day camp based at the University of Maine Orono campus, in conjunction with the UMaine Campus Recreation division. Through a series of two community focus groups and an online older adult survey, fitness activities, health and fitness goals, field trip destinations and non-physical fitness activities and barriers to participation were assessed and analyzed. The focus groups revealed a variety of ideas for potential day camp programming. Activities that were mentioned were traditional athletics, making use of existing UMaine fitness facilities, as well as healthy cooking, arts and social activities. Identified barriers to participation were transportation, cost and limited mobility for participants. A total of 29 participants completed the online survey, with a mean age of 74. The respondents were current members of the UMaine Fitness Center. From the survey, it was evident that the idea of a day camp was a novel concept as none of those surveyed had attended an adult day camp previously. Participants were found to favor brief camp programming over a week-long program model. The top activities that had the most interest were strength training, walking and balance training. Non-physical fitness activities of interest were horticulture and social activities. Potential off-site enrichment activity destinations that were identified included coastal trips and restaurant tours. The top health concerns among respondents were strength, heart health and balance. The assessment was completed in November and presented to the older adult day camp planning team. The findings from the assessment will be used to design and implement the older adult day camp offered through UMaine Campus Recreation in collaboration with the UMaine Center on Aging and other community and campus partners. | | Faculty Mentor: Jennifer... Read More →
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Meaghan Delcourt

Psychology, Sociology, Neuroscience, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Response to a Computerized Social Stress Task among Individuals who have a History of Non-suicidal Self Injury | | Non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) is the act of causing deliberate self-harm to one’s body without suicidal intent (Nock, 2012) and is known to be a strong predict... Read More →
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Alli DellaMattera

Sociology, Spanish, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Family Influence on Problem Drinking in Young Adulthood | | My research will address the relationship between family influence and problem drinking in young adulthood. A specific focus will be on the bond between child and parent, reported feelings of closeness or connectedness to the parent(s) as described by the child, and how parenting practices in adolescence impact future outcomes of young adults. The transition from adolescence to young adulthood is a time of immense transition and change. During this transition, many factors could influence the drinking habits of a young adult. It is important to study problem drinking among young adults as it is a defining, and habit-forming, time of life. Alcohol use has the potential to be associated with problems that encompass all parts of life; physically, mentally, and socially. For these reasons it is necessary to focus in on the young adult age group in relation to problem drinking. | Studying the previous literature has allowed me to know that many different independent variables have been researched in relation to problem drinking but the majority have been in connection with adolescence. The young adult age... Read More →
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Lisa Dezso

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Promoting Intergenerational Resilience | | The Promoting Intergenerational Resilience project utilizes mentoring as a tool to teach and build resilience in adolescents. The pillars we chose to promote resilience in teens are: mindfulness, distress tolerance, healthy habits (s... Read More →
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Taylor Dore

Human Development, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Exploring the Long Term Developmental Effects of Divorce on Children’s Social Interactions | | The goal of this reflective study is to look at the effects that divorce has on the children and how it affects these children socially. Using research questions and interviews with 2-3 University of Maine college students, 18 years to 25 years old, I will look to see how each person was personally affected by the divorce of their parents and what long lasting effects they still feel the divorce plays in their everyday lives. This can range from how the divorce affected them in their friend groups to what long lasting effects still play a role in how they choose partners. Once research is obtained common themes and differences will be categorized to see what similarities are shared between different students with different experiences. All coming together to show if and how divorce plays a role in... Read More →
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Kevin Duffy

Mass Communication, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Media Analysis of Maine Aquaculture Coverage, 2000-2015 | | As aquaculture is increasingly touted as a sustainable solution to offset production declines in wild-caught fisheries, it is further driven into the public sphere through mediated content. The media serves as one critical repository for content about emerging... Read More →
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Allyson Eslin

Political Science, Psychology, Economics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Influence of Economic and Psychological Metrics on Political Decision-Making | | This project seeks to quantify what economic and psychological attributes are presented by eligible Maine voters that currently comprise the state’s relatively small electorate: examining how two typically separate disciplines... Read More →
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Eliot Fearey

Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Associations between individual emotion regulation deficits and interpersonal emotion regulation strategies | | The literature suggests individuals with emotion regulation deficits may turn to relationship partners in an attempt at achieving interpersonal emotion regulation. However, the association between individual emotion regulation deficits and attempts at using interpersonal emotion regulation strategies has not been evaluated. We hypothesized emotion regulation deficits would be differentially associated with interpersonal strategies. Data were drawn from a sample of older adolescents. Self-report measures were used to assess deficits, including: nonacceptance of emotional responses, difficulty with goal directed behavior, low impulse control, emotional awareness deficits, few emotion regulation strategies, and difficulty with emotional clarity. Additionally, self-report data were collected for three interpersonal behaviors. Excessive reassurance seeking and conversational self-focus are one-sided interpersonal behaviors associated with depression and relationship problems (Joiner, 1995; Schwartz-Mette... Read More →
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Julianna Ferguson

Sociology with a concentration in Crime and Law, minor in Spanish, minor in Legal Studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Juvenile Gun Use and Violence in the United States | | This research paper examines the predictors of juvenile gun use and violence primarily through a sociological lens. A focus on specific ACE's (adverse childhood experiences) like broken families, a lack of family cohesion... Read More →
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Emma Fox

Ecology & Environmental Science, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Group Participatory Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (PMCDA) and Dam Decisions | | Dam decision-making can be challenging for riverine stakeholders; in particular, hydropower-regulated rivers have diverse and competing management objectives which complicate the decision-making process. Competing management objectives create a... Read More →
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Chynna Fuller

Human Development, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Exploring the Impact of Abortion Stigma: Interviews with College Women who have had an Abortion | | The purpose of this study is to help gain a better understanding of how the stigma of abortion impacts college women who have had an abortion. This is an exploratory study and involves interviews with a small number of college women in order to allow an in-depth examination of their experiences with abortion. Although abortion has been legal for over 40 years and it is a fairly common procedure, it is emotionally charged and often stigmatized. This study utilizes a qualitative approach. It will involve interviews with college women ages 18-24 who have had an abortion during their time in college. Issues such as how a woman feels about her choice, who she has told about her abortion experience and how those people reacted as well as how the issue has been handled in college classes and in the media will be explored. We are currently conducting interviews for this study and findings will presented at the research event. It is hoped that this study will lead to a better understanding of... Read More →
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Moriah Geer

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
OADS Clinical Review Team Formation | | My LEND (Leadership and Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities) leadership placement is with the DHHS Office of Aging and Disability Services (OADS), assisting in establishing and training a clinical review team (CRT) for Section 21 and 29 Medicaid waiver services. Section 21 and 29 fund home and community supports for adults with developmental disabilities or ASD. Supports like these are vital in ensuring that individuals with disabilities are able to lead fulfilling lives. OADS formed a clinical review team to assess the efficiency and appropriateness of the services that are currently being utilized. They are collecting and analyzing data in order to make recommendations for improvement to the Department. I studied the section 21 and 29 rules, shadowed case managers and attended trainings in order to better understand the current program. I was then able to assist in developing training tools for the newly hired CRT. I also assisted with developing a database to enable the staff to quickly see which clients are due for a review. The purpose of this placement was to allow me to develop and apply my leadership skills. One way that I was able to do this at OADS was by helping with the group formation process as new members were added to the CRT over time. I was also challenged by frequently changing goals and objectives and I learned that flexibility is an important leadership skill. I believe that my experience fulfilled the LEND objective for my placement. | | Faculty Mentor: Alan... Read More →
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Christopher Gilbert

Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Movement and Respiration Events During Sleep and Their Relation to Cognitive Decline In Mild Cognitve Impairment | | Dementia such as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the most common forms of cognitive decline, with AD accounting for 60-80% of... Read More →
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Angela Hallowell

Economics, International Affairs, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Factors Affecting Teaching Quality: An Analysis of Course Evaluations | | The University of Maine strives to provide quality education and positive learning experiences to its students. To be successful, it is crucial to ensure a high standard of teaching quality. Understanding... Read More →
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Dylan Haroldsen

Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cognition Under Stress: The Impact of Social-Evaluative Stress During Cognitive Task Performance Research on the relationship between psychosocial stress and cognition is often contradictory demonstrating both enhancement and impairment of performance. We propose that the relationship between stress and cognition depends both on variability in stress response (challenge vs threat) and the cognitive system mediating performance (explicit vs procedural; Ell, Cosley... Read More →
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Kimberly Herron

Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cognition under stress: The impact of social-evaluative stress during cognitive task performance | | Research on the relationship between psychosocial stress and cognition is often contradictory demonstrating both enhancement and impairment of performance. We propose that the relationship between stress and cognition depends both on variability in stress response (challenge vs threat) and the cognitive system mediating performance (explicit vs procedural; Ell, Cosley... Read More →
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Rachael Huff

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Comorbidity of Binge Eating Disorder severity with mood disorders: Examining gender differences | | Binge Eating Disorder (BED), or loss of control while consuming an objectively large amount of food, has been shown to be comorbid with Major Depressive Disorder among women, even compared to obese controls (Telch... Read More →
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Melissa Jankowski

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Social-Cognitive Risk for Suicide: False Perception or Self-Fulfilling Prophecy? | | Interpersonal theory of suicide (IPT; Joiner, 2005) suggests perceptions of burdensomeness to others and feelings of thwarted belongingness predict risk for suicidal ideation. While research... Read More →
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Michael Kennedy

English, Philosophy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Illiteracy as Immanent: The (Re)Writing of Rhetoric's Nature Literacy is often thought of as a skill-set, that is, an ability to read and write in the dominant language of one’s socio-historical milieu. Illiteracy, on the other hand, is often thought of as a lack – an absence of a necessary skill-set that influences how well one can work and communicate (via reading and writing) within their dominant language and their society. In other words, illiteracy seems to have been defined through its relationship to the definition of literacy, that is, as a... Read More →
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Emily Kobrock

Secondary Education, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Exploring the Impacts of Childfree Families | | The goal of this exploratory study is to learn how a childfree lifestyle influences family relationships and interactions, particularly among family members who have children. Given the shifting landscape of the American family, there has been an increase in childfree families in the... Read More →
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Trevor Lamb

Anthropology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Temporal Classification of Historic Period Domestic Ceramics at The Holmes Point West Archaeological Site | | Many European ceramics manufactured during the post-medieval period (c. 1500-1800) are highly diagnostic in nature. A sizable assemblage of ceramics from the latter half of this period has been recovered from the Holmes Point West site on Machias Bay in Maine. Although some of the ceramics from the site have been the subject of limited research, the majority have been understudied. This research has sought to separate the historic ceramics recovered from Holmes Point West into vessel lots, using documented sources and comparative samples within the University of... Read More →
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Katrina Lapham

Communication Sciences & Disorders, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Cerebral Palsy and Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Important Components and Considerations for AAC Implementation (Table 26 Side L, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Cerebral palsy is often associated with expressive language deficits, and many children with cerebral palsy require... Read More →
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Hannah Lawrence

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Risk for depression and suicidality: Evaluating the role of visual and verbal rumination | | Rumination (repeatedly dwelling on negative emotion) is one transdiagnostic factor known to increase risk for depression and suicidality. To date, rumination has nearly exclusively been examined as verbal thought, though it is likely that some individuals ruminate in a visual way. Participants (N=103; Mage=19.28; 68.9% female) completed measures of depressive symptoms, suicidality, rumination, and an original measure of rumination style (visual, verbal, both), to evaluate whether ruminating visually (i.e., dwelling in the form of mental images), verbally (i.e., dwelling in the form of words), or both visually and verbally differentially related to depressive symptom severity and suicidality. | Interestingly, 59.2% of participants experienced visual ruminative thoughts, with 23.3% reporting exclusively visual cognitions when feeling depressed. | | Rumination style significantly moderated the relationship between rumination and depressive symptom severity, R2=.08, F(2,96)=9.75, p | | Faculty Mentor: Rebecca... Read More →
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Chelsea Liddell

Natural Resource Economics and Policy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Determinants of Preferences Regarding Logging in Maine's North Woods | | Despite declines, both logging and the wood products industry it supports remain an important part of Maine's economy and culture. However, evidence of logging can be objectionable to the growing number... Read More →
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Adriana Martineau

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Importance of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Research in Student Athlete Locker Rooms | | Noise-induced hearing loss is a heavily studied topic in the field of audiology. Because of this research, there is a broad understanding of how damage is caused and at what sound levels... Read More →
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Rafael Mata

Economics, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Developing Best Practice Methods by Using Survey Data | | WindowDressers is a non-profit organization from Rockport, Maine. This volunteer organization seeks to help reduce home heating cost by providing people with cheap window inserts. Window inserts are wooden frames that fit inside a... Read More →
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Emma McWilliams

Psychology, WGS, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Impact of Make Up on the Perceptions of Women in STEM | | Despite advances, gender roles still marginalize women who pursue careers in male-dominated fields (Autumn, 2013; Eagly & Karau, 2002). We hypothesized that the more a woman embraced her femininity (e.g. wearing make-up) the less suited she would seem for a career in STEM. We also examined the consequences of the... Read More →
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Molly Miller

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Title: Round Table examining fisheries co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s intertidal aquaculture industry (Room 6 Presenter 3) | | The Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) utilizes Ostrom’s social-ecological systems framework to conduct research designed to improve and further develop aquaculture in Maine. Community-based intertidal aquaculture has the potential to diversify... Read More →
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Megan Morey

Communication Sciences and Disorders, Interdisciplinary Disabilities Studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Disability in Advertising | | Despite the potency of advertising to influence behavior and cultural | memes, it has been unusual until recently to see people with | impairments featured in commercials that market mainstream products, ideas, and services. To the contrary, pe... Read More →
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Faith Perez

Social Work / Interdisciplinary Disability Studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Theory use in Social Work practice (Section E Poster 19) | | We present the results of a class project in which all students examined how human behavior theories learned in class are actualized in social work practice. Each student asked one social worker in diverse fields about... Read More →
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Elizabeth Proctor

Anthropology, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Art History, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Legendary King: How the Figure of King Arthur Shaped a National Identity and the Field of Archaeology in Britain | | The legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table has permeated Western Culture to such an extent that he is an immediately recognizable figure who represents courtly chivalry and the justice of the rightful king. The question of whether such a figure existed has captured public fascination, even if most historians agree he likely... Read More →
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Jasmine Proctor

Business Management, Communication, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Communicable Drinking: Understanding the Relationships between Communication and Underage Drinking on a College Campus | | Underage drinking is an ongoing issue in the United States and particularly on college campuses (Harding et al., 2016). College students consume more alcohol than their same-aged peers who are not enrolled in college (Johnston... Read More →
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Victoria Quinones

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Trait Rumination, Social Problem-Solving and Gender | | Depressive rumination, the tendency to repeatedly dwell on the causes and consequences of one’s negative mood (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1991) is involved in the onset, maintenance and duration of depressed mood (Nolen-Hoeksema et al., 2008). The RST (1999) posits that the relationship between rumination and depression may be related to the negative impact rumination has on problem-solving (Nolen-Hoeksema et al., 2008). Two subtypes of depressive rumination have been identified: brooding, a maladaptive form, and reflection, a less maladaptive form of rumination (Treynor et al, 2003). Preliminary research completed in Japan found that brooding was associated with maladaptive, whereas reflection was associated with more adaptive problem-solving (Hasegawa et al., 2015; 2016). The present study examined the relationship between rumination and social problem-solving. In addition, gender differences were explored. | | 148 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers completed measures of depressive symptoms (BDI-II; Beck et al., 1996), rumination (RRS; Nolen-Hoeksema... Read More →
avatar for Kaitlyn Raffier

Kaitlyn Raffier

Ecology and Environmental Science, concentration in Sustainability, Environmental Policy and Natural Resource Management, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Analysis of Dams through Fact Sheet Creation to Aid in Further Dam Decision Making The state of Maine has 597 dams, 156 of which are of high or significant hazard potential according to the National Inventory of Dams Database. With many of them approaching their dates for relicensing, it is important we look at each dam to decide what is best for the future of the stakeholders, environment and renewable energy production. There are many location specific factors to consider: hydrography, land use, history, turbine type, owner, fish lifts, energy generated etc. but these data are not compiled in any one place for us to access. As we run out of resources to supply us with energy, we must research more sustainable ways to produce energy. Hydropower could be that alternative. Yet, many stakeholders wonder how... Read More →
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Ian Raugh

Psychology/English, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Evaluation of LEIDS-RR measure of cognitive reactivity as a predictor of depressive symptoms and risk of relapse. | | Cognitive reactivity, or a mood-induced increase in dysfunctional beliefs, is a risk factor for depressive relapse (Lau, Segal, & Williams, 2004). Cognitive reactivity is typically measured using a negative mood induction (i.e. listen to sad music) to evaluate change in dysfunctional attitudes. The Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity (LEIDS-RR; Solis et al., 2016) was developed to measure cognitive reactivity without a mood induction. The present research evaluated the LEIDS-RR as a predictor of depressive symptoms and relapse using data from a randomized clinical trial of formerly depressed individuals (N = 235). Participants were assigned to Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), relaxation therapy (RT), or as a waitlist control. Total LEIDS-RR scores did not predict depressive symptoms or relapse. LEIDS-RR scores were significantly lower post-treatment, regardless of group (slope = -6.79, p... Read More →
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Abby Roche

Communication & Journalism, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Collaborative engagement and communication preferences: An ongoing mixed methods investigation into the Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) | | This poster will present ongoing results from a mixed method investigation that explores the collaborative process and communication preferences of a large, interdisciplinary, NSF funded, UMaine research initiative. To better understand the communication preferences on the SEANET team, we first conducted a survey with team members. (n=58) during the summer of 2016. Semi-structured interviews (n=26) were conducted throughout Summer and Fall 2016 to supplement survey results. Our results indicate shared motivations and collective visions in terms of challenges and projected outcomes. Additionally, the findings from the survey related to collective communication competencies are suggestive of different disciplinary affiliation ways of approaching and thinking about, and motivations for being involved in, collaborative research projects. Collectively, the findings of the quantitative study indicate avenues for future research related to motivations to engage, shared problem frames, and roles relational influence on communication processes within these collaborations, which can all be further investigated through collected interview data. | | Faculty Mentor: Laura... Read More →
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Christine da Rosa

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Volunteering in the Age of the “Silver Tsunami” Volunteerism has declined precipitously despite proven benefits to both volunteers and society. It is unclear whether the retiring Baby Boomer population will provide a larger pool of volunteers (Burtica, Johnson & Zedlewski, 2009; Tang, Morrow-Howell... Read More →
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Jaime Roy

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 10:45AM-12:00PM
A survey of noise exposure and hearing health of University of Maine pep band members | | While noise-induced hearing loss has been studied extensively, little research has focused on music-induced hearing loss, which is due to loud music exposure. Previous research has shown that loud music from an ensemble can produce dangerous noise levels (Jin et al., 2013). In the current study, noise levels were examined during pep band performances at hockey games in Alfond Arena and basketball games at the Cross Insurance Center. Noise levels were measured during The Stein Song using the iPhone app, Decibel 10th. We hypothesized that noise levels may differ based on the sporting event. In a second study, UMaine Pep Band... Read More →
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Arianna Sessoms

Student Development in Higher Education, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Is Peace Possible?: A Comprehensive Theory to Unite A Divided Society | | Today, conflict, tragedy, and confusion are a staple of our everyday lives. The virality of social media forces us to be aware and engaged in present issues that we otherwise may have been oblivious to. With this overwhelming knowledge, visibility, tension, and calls to activism, it looks as though peace is unattainable within and amongst our cultures. However, in this paper I analyzed and integrated peace theories and works by visionaries such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., the Dalai Lama, Aldo Leopold, Vandana Shiva, and more, to create one simple yet comprehensive international theory that expounds on the possibility of peace in our modern society and how to obtain it through the principles of compassion, equality, nonviolence, and community. | | Faculty Mentor: Yvonne... Read More →
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Jessica Shankman

Clinical Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Influence of Friendships and Dating Relationships on Depressive Symptom Development Concurrently and Over Time | | Attachment theory supports that peers (e.g., friendships; romantic relationships) become increasingly salient in adolescence (Collins, 2005). Research suggests that some negative qualities of adolescent friendship and dating experiences (e.g., conflict) can adversely impact... Read More →
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David Smith

Psychology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Delayed enhancement in rule-based category learning following acute psychosocial stress | | Stressful situations result in the activation of multiple physiological responses. Recent research suggests that the time varying nature of these physiological responses has important implications for cognitive function, particularly processes dependent upon prefrontal cortical function. Presently we consider the temporal impact of this response in relation to rule-based categorization... Read More →
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Elena Smith

Economics, Global Policy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Analyzing the Earning Profiles of Immigrants and United States Citizens using a Mincer Earnings Function | | A mincer earnings function is known as a single equation model that uses income as a function of schooling and work experience. The basic function is expanded greatly when considering elements of workers such as sex and immigrant status. The model uses U.S. census data from 2000 hosted by the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series at the University of Minnesota. Ordinary least squares is the estimation method used to regress the model in order calculate the returns to education. From this the model is able to both calculate how long it takes for male and female immigrants to catch up to natives, and illustrate the earning profiles of all four parties. | | Regression results support a strong significance on all convention levels for immigrant and gender variable coefficients, allowing for further estimation to be justifiably calculated. The model is then able to tell calculate the number of years it takes for an individual to reach a maximum level of experience prior to the moment of depreciation based off gender and immigrant status. For male natives it takes 29.76 years, for female natives it takes 43.77 years, for male immigrants it takes 39 years, and for immigrant females it takes 43.57 years. From this, the years it takes for immigrants to catch up in their native counterparts is found from the model. For male immigrants it takes 16.8 years and for female immigrants it takes 14.73 years. From this one can illustrate the earning profiles of each member by graphing the wage differential, controlled by the gender and immigrant variables, with their age. The model naturally accounts of a difference between immigrants and citizens by assuming they enter the nation at the age 20. | | The estimates found in the model are supported by heavily cited articles, showing both strikingly similar results in levels and direction of coefficients, and illustrated earnings profiles of immigrants and natives. | | Faculty Mentor: Elena... Read More →
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Katelyn F. Smith

Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Exploring the Experiences and Impact of Middle School and/or High School Bullying: Interviews with College Women | | The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of bullying experiences and how being bullied impacts a person. Specifically, this study examined the bullying experiences and its impact for women who were subjected to such behaviors while in middle school and/or high school. College women between the ages of 18-24 were asked a series of questions during a one-on-one interview that explored their middle school and/or high school experience with being bullied and the impact they feel this bullying has had on them. | According to StopBullying.gov: | | "Bullying is defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose". | | This study is designed to further our understanding of the relationship that bullying experienced in middle school and/or high school has had on college women. It is hoped that the results will add to our understanding of the long-lasting effects of bullying. In addition, it is hoped that this study will provide insight on what middle school and/or high school personnel can do to assist girls that are currently being bullied, as well as provide suggestions for what colleges might be able to do to assist victims of bullying. | | References | Stopbullying.gov (2016). What is the definition of bullying. US. Department of Health and Human Services. Washington, DC. Accessed September 26, 2016 http://www.stopbullying.gov/what-is-bullying/index.html | | Faculty Mentor: Sandra... Read More →
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Maxwell Staver

Human Development, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Society's Perceptions of Husbands who Make Less Money than Their Wives | | The goal of this exploratory study is to learn about society’s perceptions of husbands who make less money than their wives. Due to a demographic shift in the genders roles of families, society has broken away from the traditional stereotype that men are... Read More →
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Kassie Stevens

Masters in Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Testing the Effectiveness of Person-Centered Planning in Maine Adults With Developmental Disabilities | | Rationale: Over the last several decades a process called “person-centered planning,” or PCP, has increasingly been used to identify supports and services for individuals with developmental disabilities. It is now a requirement of the Maine Office of Aging and Disabilities Services (OADS) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Very little research exists on the fidelity with which PCP is implemented and there are no tools for measuring the quality of the process. | | Objectives: The goal is to develop a tool to measure the quality of PCP used in planning supports for Maine adults with developmental disabilities. The tool will be used to measure the extent to which an... Read More →
JS

Jessica Stevens

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Identifying the Systems-Level Impact of the Penquis Regional Linking Project: Community Partner Perspectives | | TITLE: Identifying the Systems-Level Impact of the Penquis Regional Linking Project: Community Partner Perspectives | Abstract | The Penquis Regional Linking Project (PRLP) was created as an effort to better serve families within the Penquis region affected by substance abuse. The goal of the Project is to increase the overall well-being of children ages 0-5 who have been affected by substance abuse. The Penquis Regional Linking Partnership, which was formed prior to the PRLP, consists of numerous organizations and agencies that work collaboratively to address needs in the community surrounding substance abuse, connecting families to resources, and addressing service gaps from a systems-level perspective. The partnership members were invited to participate in an interview conducted by a member of the University of Maine Center on Aging (CoA) to gather data that will facilitate an understanding of changes in the Penquis Linking Partnership and the regional service system as a result of participation in the Project. A total of nine partnership members took part in qualitative interviews. The partners were asked a series of questions pertaining to expectations of the project, use of evidence-based practices, project sustainability, and recommendations for improvement. The data was collected and analyzed using primarily a simple thematic qualitative approach. Researchers identified themes from the interviews which will be articulated in a final evaluation report for the Project. This study will be utilized to clarify partner perceptions of the Project and its impact, and will aid in the final assessment of the... Read More →
ET

Ethan Tremblay

Resource Economics and Policy, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Splitting Together: The Evolution of Cooperation in Food Buying Clubs | | Food buying clubs are voluntary consumer organizations in which members collaborate to purchase bulk food at wholesale prices, thus achieving price savings and access to specialty foodstuffs. These groups rely on voluntary cooperation among members, expressed when members contribute time and resources to the... Read More →
SW

Silas Walsh

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Age Friendly Communities: The Future is Now | | Age Friendly Communities: The Future is Now | The UMaine Center on Aging conducted a mixed methods assessment of Bangor’s livability for older adults, made possible by the City of Bangor and the Bangor Livable Community Steering Committee. Through a series of eight community based focus groups, the Age Friendly community assessment analyzed the Bangor area in accordance with the World Health... Read More →
DW

Delaney Woodford

Child Development and Family Relations, 10:45AM-12:00PM
The Effects of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Adolescents’ Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors | | Child sexual abuse is often associated with negative outcomes in adolescence. This ongoing study investigates how the trauma of sexual abuse during childhood can shape an individual’s sex... Read More →

Judges
TF

Thane Fremouw

Faculty, UMAINE
avatar for Chris Grindrod

Chris Grindrod

Faculty, UMAINE
SL

Sara Lowden

Anthropology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Ecuador's misappropriation of "buen vivir" This paper examines the epistemological tension surrounding the concept of "buen vivir" and its implications for the governance of natural resources in Ecuador. Rooted in Andean cosmology, "buen vivir" is an emergent philosophy akin to the degrowth movement that addresses the societal and ecological limitations of modern capitalism. This discourse analysis uses the lens of political ecology to investigate Ecuadorian President, Rafael Correa, and his political party's attempt to manipulate and institutionalize "buen vivir" in order to advocate industrial mineral extraction in concordance with the hegemonic extractivist model common throughout Latin America (Kauffman 2014). The analysis studies how Ecuador's constitution promotes responsible mining that respects the "rights of Nature" while in effect aggravating uneven social relations and increasing instability within mining zones (Vanhulst 2014). Interviews conducted in March 2016 in Zamora Province, a rural region near the southeastern border of Peru, reveal growing community opposition to large scale extraction of subsurface mining and document a failure to involve local stakeholders in participatory processes concerning extraction. Such exclusionary processes violate the central pillars of buen vivir and serve to reproduce the dominant growth discourse. References Kauffman, Craig M., and Pamela L. Martin 2014 Scaling Up Buen Vivir: Globalizing Local Environmental Governance from Ecuador. Global Environmental Politics 14(1):40-58. Vanhulst, Julien, and Adrian E. Beling 2014 Buen Vivir: Emergent Discourse within Or Beyond Sustainable Development? Ecological Economics 101:54-63. | | Faculty Mentor: Christine... Read More →
avatar for Elisabeth Maxwell

Elisabeth Maxwell

Marine biology, marine policy, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Examining fishery co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s soft-shell clam fishery. The Maine soft-shell clam fishery is managed by a unique co-management system that involves shared governance between local communities and the state government... Read More →
AM

Anna McGinn

Climate Change Institute and School for Policy and International Affairs, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Origins of the Anthropocene in Maine and the Northeast | | In 2016, an international group of leading geologists recommended adding a new epoch in Earth’s time scale - the “Anthropocene” - defined by the primacy of human activity in controlling global climate. While the Anthropocene is globally defined, the onset may be spatially asynchronous. We use Maine as a case study to consider the relative degrees to which local, regional, and global human activity influenced... Read More →
BS

Brittany Seman

Microbiology, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Yeast and Filaments Have Independent, Specialized Roles During Disseminated Fungal Infections | | Each year, invasive fungal infections kill between 30-50% of patients who have weakened immune systems due to chemotherapy and corticosteroid use. Most of these fungal infections... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

12:00pm

Fellowship Awards Luncheon
Monday April 24, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Ballroom

1:00pm

Exhibits/Performances – Business
Speakers
PA

Paul Arabatzis

Computer Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Belgium Presentation | | We are doing a trade show on the tourism in Belgium. This presentation will focus on the highlights of Belgium with economic, tourism, political, and local traditions. Our presentation will have some traditional food samples, as well as maps of the la... Read More →
RB

Robert Begin

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Italy | | The main goal of this presentation is to bring information about business opportunities in the country of Italy. We will be doing this with a PowerPoint presentation, food from the country, and pan-flits with information on it. | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea... Read More →
avatar for David Bickford-Duane

David Bickford-Duane

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Jordan: A Great Place for Business | | Our booth at the MBS Trade Show Session will feature the country of Jordan. We will have information at the booth regarding the history, culture, business opportunities, and other information about Jordan. The information will be from pe... Read More →
CB

Cameron Buthlay

Business Management, Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Israel | | The aim of our project is to introduce what Israel has to offer from a business standpoint. Our research will be based on exploring what business ventures are best suited for the business environment in Israel. Our booth will showcase our findings and work to gener... Read More →
SC

Shelby Caron

Business Administration, Management, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Switzerland | | Our project's focus is to advertise the country of Switzerland. We plan on bringing Switzerland's culture straight to the Cross Center. We want everyone who walks by our presentation to feel like Switzerland came to Bangor. We will prove why everyone needs to... Read More →
DC

Donald Christian Chervenak

Business Management, MIS, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Philippines | | For our booth at the trade show we will be presenting the Philippines. At our booth, we will have some food that is native to the area, as well as plenty of awesome tourist attractions that are worthwhile going to while visiting Philippines. We will also g... Read More →
KD

Katerina Dagher

Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
All Things Finland | | Our team is doing a research project on Finland through the University of Maine. From our research, we should be experts on Finnish culture, strengths, characteristics, economy, etc. Our booth will be focused and designed based on the country being the... Read More →
LD

Luke Dang

Accounting and Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Netherlands | | The country we are doing research on is the Netherlands. Nick, Leah, Graham, and I are doing research on their culture, government, history, climate entertainment/tourism, and other smaller areas of the country. Our goal is to bring awareness and facts about the country to those that come by our table may not have known otherwise. It is our hope that while we are informing our... Read More →
HD

Haley Dillon

Business Management and Marketing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
United Kingdom BUA343-0002 | | We will prepare a booth that will promote doing business in the United Kingdom and we will be part of an economic development for the United Kingdom. | | Faculty Mentors: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Hayden Ciomei, Matt Closson, Kevin Davids... Read More →
RD

Ryan Duperry

Business Mgmt, 1:00PM-2:15PM
MBS Trade Show | | The focus of the project is to inform the attendees of the MBS trade show what Honduras is like. Our project focuses on business aspects of Honduras including, what commodities come from there, currencies, religion, demographics, and much more. The outcome... Read More →
CF

Catherine Fellows

Finance/Managment, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Vida em Portugal | | The focus of our project is to research Portugal and come together as an economic development team. Our team is promoting the lifestyle, employment, and trade in Portugal. Our research methods include contacting Portugal’s representatives in the U.S., meeting with Portuguese students/faculty at the University of Maine and the greater Bangor area, and doing individual in depth research on... Read More →
DF

Devon Foster

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Malaysia | | We are participating in the MBS Trade Show Session at the Cross Center in Bangor. Our country is Malaysia and we have been researching every aspect of the country that we can. We will be discussing its culture, trade, business practices, demographics, etc. We wil... Read More →
JG

James Gilmore

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Thailand | | At the MBS Trade show our group will be giving a presentation on Thailand. Our group will give a presentation on the culture, politics, and economy of Thailand. The purpose of our presentation will be to try and convince people to invest or do business in Thailan... Read More →
JH

Justin Hadley

Business Administration, Marketing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Life and Business in Liechtenstein | | Our exhibit on the country of Liechtenstein is part of the Maine Business School Trade Show. We will be focusing on the qualities of the country that make it a unique place to live and to do business. Our extensive research will allow us to present information on topics such as: the lifestyle in Liechtenstein, what a typical meal is like, forms of currency, requirements for doing business, laws and regulations, and much more. We will also be available to address any unaddressed concerns that visitors to our booth may have. | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Olivia... Read More →
TH

Tim Hardy

| Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Tristin Harvey, Peter Hill, Joshua Hoch
RH

Rebecca Hatt

Business Management, Business Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Visit Argentina | | This exhibit will showcase the wonderful culture, and scenic beauty, of Argentina. The presentation will include visual displays as well as presentations and demonstrations. The table will highlight typical traditional meals as well and the Argentine Tango... Read More →
RK

Robert Kiah

Business Management, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Pura Vida, The Costa Rican Way of Life | | The focus of this project is centered around immersing people in Costa Rica's "Pura Vida" culture. Transcending its governmental, economic, and educational structures will provide a genuine snapshot into the Costa Rican way of life... Read More →
MK

Michael Krug

Business Management, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Sweden | | Our team has prepared a booth in order to promote doing business and the overall economic development of the country of Sweden. | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea 
JL

Joe Leclair

Accounting, Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Bolivia | | Our group members include Christina Laverriere, Joe Leclair, and Greg L'Heureux. We plan to act as economic development officers and promote Bolivia at our booth. Our research includes an understanding of Bolivia's economy, geography, government, culture, etc... Read More →
AL

Andrew Lee

Finance, Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Canada: A Business Perspective | | We will have an exhibit to give people a better understanding of doing business with northern neighbor Canada. We will have various research materials available as well as samples of some Canadian culture, specifically the Quebec Region. We will also be answering questions on trade laws, visa regulation, economics and other subjects relevant to business in Canada. | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors... Read More →
TL

Tenzin Lekmon

| Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Kayla Leland, Danielle Lelio, Matthew Lewiche
MW

Mei Wa Li

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Academic Development | | Tourist Attraction- Bulgaria | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Nathan Mathis,  Amanda Mancheva, Jason Matovu
JM

Jesse MacDonald

Business Marketing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Chile | | Our international trade show booth will be designed for the country of Chile. The focus of our booth will be highlighting the culture and tourism industry of the country. Along with highlighting the modern day tourism industry, we are also going to be incorporating... Read More →
NM

Nick Maynard

Accounting, Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Turkey | | MBS Trade Show Session | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Abby Moody, Luke McNamara, Stephen Merrill
LM

Liam Morton

Business Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Poland | | Our projects focus and goal is to inform people at the cross center of the great country of Poland. Aiming at the economic status and social well being of the country. We will also be exploring the lifestyle of the people of Poland, including certain festivals, cel... Read More →
CM

Christina Muse

Business Management, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A Day in Peru | | We are participating in the MBS Trade Show Session. The country that we will be presenting is Peru. For this we will have detailed and thorough information about Peru and what every day life is like in that country. Our aim for this event is to have visitors... Read More →
JP

Jason Pina

Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Albania | | For our booth we plan to inform people about some key aspects Albania has to offer. We are a group of four students, we will be sharing a broad overview of Albania’s culture and norms. We will also be sharing information about Albania such as their GDP, GNI, curre... Read More →
MP

Mitchell Pratt

Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Hungarian Economic Development | | The goal of our exhibit is to help people see how engaging in economic activity with Hungary in any form will be beneficial, not only to them, but to the country of Hungary as a whole. Information regarding the economics, political, cultural... Read More →
JP

Jacob Prevatt

Accounting, 1:00PM-2:15PM
New Zealand | | Our team brings an authentic look at New Zealand’s culture with the use of slideshows, music, and students filled with knowledge over the country. Our tvs will be playing slide showings displaying some of the beautiful landscapes that make up New Zealand, trad... Read More →
AR

Alex Rahmon

| Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Jessica Ricker, Kyle Sedler, Emily Shaw, Jon Sirois
CR

Campbell Rowe

Marketing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Fiji Islands | | Give viewers an understanding of the country of Fiji. Explain and show the demographics of the country, how they earn their income, and any relations with the United States and other countries. | | Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: Kirby Si... Read More →
JS

Jessica Sosa

Business Management, 1:00PM-2:15PM
International Business: Tanzania | | Purpose | The purpose of this exhibit is to successfully market the country of Tanzania to the attendees for academic and business intentions. Audience members will desirably be able to informally understand basic principles on how to engage in international business in Tanzania; with focus primarily on the topics of history, culture, politics, economics and investments. | | Method | The booth display will consist of how a typical market would look like in Tanzania and the products available in this setting. This will consist of several 4 foot wooden pallets as walls with products, flags, clothing, etc being hung as display behind the presenters. Crates in front of the table will hold other products that... Read More →
MT

Michael Townsend

Finance, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Bermuda Exhibit | | The Bermuda team has done conducted in depth research on the country of Bermuda to share at the trade show. We are researching travel, political, economic, geographic, and demographic information and statics. Each team member has focused on a particular to... Read More →
RW

Ryan Wang

| Faculty Mentor: Clint Relyea | | Co-authors: George Vergados, Ty Walko, Connor Walsh, Slade Watson

Judges
LD

Lisa Dezso

Social Work, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Promoting Intergenerational Resilience | | The Promoting Intergenerational Resilience project utilizes mentoring as a tool to teach and build resilience in adolescents. The pillars we chose to promote resilience in teens are: mindfulness, distress tolerance, healthy habits (s... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom

1:00pm

Exhibits/Performances – Social Sciences
Speakers
JB

Jeremy Boulier

Faculty Mentor: Elizabeth DePoy
JD

Jonathan Deschaine

Financial Economics, Mathematics, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Exploring U.S. Citizen Knowledge of Aquaculture | | While aquaculture continues to boom in the waters of the United States, the information surrounding it has not. However, expanded aquaculture may conflict with existing marine uses (ex: recreation, wild harvest) and viewscapes. Thus, expansion of aquaculture may experience constraints from social acceptance. To improve our understanding of citizen acceptance of aquaculture, we designed and administered an online survey to collect information regarding aquaculture awareness, perceptions, and governance. Participants provided information on a scale from 0 to 100 on both current level of knowledge and perceived knowledge needs. When asked how much they currently knew about aquaculture, respondents reported an average of 15.87 out of 100 (N = 1210). When asked how much they thought they needed to know, respondents reported an average of 41.83 out of 100 (N = 1210). The knowledge gap is further explored through six common myths regarding aquaculture provided by NOAA (i.e. Growing shellfish can improve water quality); interestingly over 60% of respondents were unable to answer these questions. Linear regression will be executed to determine the factors that explain a citizen's view of their current, and needed knowledge, including socio-demographics, sources of information and current risk perceptions of aquaculture. This analysis is important to those seeking to identify a place in which to improve aquaculture education, whether it be in the classroom or elsewhere. Further, this work will provide insight into social acceptance of aquaculture development which is key information for marine planners. | | Faculty Mentor: Caroline... Read More →
AD

Anna Dixon

Social Work, 1:00PM-2:15PM
An Graduate Student Exit Interview Protocol DEvelopment | | This study involves the development of a systematic, theory informed exist interview protocol for a social work graduate school. Exit interviews have multiple purposes from formative evaluation to engendering loyalty... Read More →
GR

Garrett Raymond

Economics, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis to Compare Fuel Production Processes Developing sustainable vehicle fuels is widely considered to be an important step towards achieving a sustainable energy future. Like many sustainable technologies, fuel production is often assessed based on its performance across multiple criteria. Due to the complexity of such assessments it can be challenging to compare production processes with one another in a consistent manner. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a common tool for overcoming this barrier because it allows stakeholders to quickly compare alternative production processes based upon their own stated values for each criterion. This research project aims at creating a user friendly and robust MCDA tool that can be used to compare different fuel production methods across environmental, economic, and social criteria. The tool will be used to compare the Acid Hydrolysis Dehydration (AHDH) process of producing drop-in renewable diesel from woody biomass with other fuel production methods. Preliminary results will be reported alongside the MCDA model. | | Faculty Mentor: Sharon... Read More →
MR

Mitchel Roberge

History/French, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Le Messager: A Franco-American Newspaper and its Impacts | | Le Messager was a newspaper printed in French for the French-Canadian immigrant community in Lewiston Maine and surrounding areas. I believe that the close-knit communities and strong sense of identities in these communities were heavily influenced by this paper. By providing a common, consistent source of information and a clear and focused agenda with a specific perspective, the communities that read this paper would all be influenced to think and perceive events in the same way. The paper was both incredibly successful and well-spread, paving the way for a strong Franco-American identity which transcended even their devotion to their church. | | Faculty Mentor: Susan... Read More →
AT

April Turner

Faculty Mentor: Elizabeth DePoy

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom

1:00pm

Oral Presentations – Allied Health
Speakers
OB

Olivia Bogucki

Clinical Psychology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The role of comorbid trait anxiety symptoms in the relationship between chronic depressive symptoms and cardiovascular disease in older adults: Findings from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study | | Previous research has suggested that anxiety and depressive symptoms are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disorder (CVD). Anxiety symptoms may be playing a role in the relationship between depressive symptoms and CVD (Xiang... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Room 1

1:00pm

Oral Presentations – Arts
Speakers
AC

Alicia Champlin

Intermedia, 1:00PM-2:15PM
MOTIVE: Considerations of a Research-based Performance | | This presentation explores lessons learned and distills outcomes from a performance installation instigated by a research-based creative practice. The performance, "MOTIVE," took place in December, 2016, and was intended to spark questions about the relationships between media and maker, between language and speaker, and between truth and metaphor... Read More →
AE

Alan Estes

Theatre, 1:00PM-2:15PM
(sign) or A Staged Collection of Experiences in the Deaf Community "(sign)" is a one-act play performed in American Sign Language. Using ASL on the stage provides a social commentary on the stigma towards the deaf community and elicits a conversation on communication beyond vocalization in our society. What it means to be Deaf is challenged in how the audience perceives a scene first in ASL. Then, with English interpretation, they see what assumptions are made in our encounters with the Deaf community. "(sign)" is formatted as a collection of dramatized anonymous experiences drawn from the Deaf community. Exposure is vital in learning to adapt and accept different lifestyles. As a medium, Theatre has proven to increase exposure and incite dialogue on issues such as race, religion, sexual orientation, etc. "(sign)" itself is only an attempt to understand and empathize with the Deaf community. In this attempt, we must work to see a better future. We may not all like the hands we are given, but we are all dealing with the same deck of cards. | | Faculty Mentor: Marcia... Read More →
CG

Catherine Gottwalk

English, Journalism, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Creative and Communicative Integrity | | Our research is a combination of two ethnographic, qualitative case studies. Our research objective focuses on incentivizing creative writers to utilize the Writing Center, constructing tutoring sessions specifically designed to focus on the perspective and voice of these writers, and how to keep these writers coming back. We study volunteer students, who commit to regularly attend tutorials, and interview for feedback that is compiled and shared with creative writers on campus with the hope that these writers will be motivated to collaborate in tutorials. We further analyze the... Read More →
EK

Eleanor Kipping

Intermedia MFA, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Eleanor Kipping | | Despite the success of the The Civil Rights movement in bringing issues of segregation, violence and racial discrimination to the forefront of national attention, generations later many still confront racism, oppression, and marginalization that is systema... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Room 1

1:00pm

Oral Presentations – Biomedical Sciences
Speakers
SA

Sarah Alamer

Biomedical Sciences, molecular and cellular biology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The regulatory role of a phosphorylated G protein: Implication for lipid microdomains | | Heterotrimeric G-proteins play crucial roles in various signaling pathways, where they act as molecular switches in transducing a signal from G protein-coupled receptors to downstream effectors. Post-translation modifications such as phosphorylation and palmitoylation can be important factors in regulating G protein function at the plasma membrane, but the mechanism of their involvement remains poorly defined. We used Dictyostelium discoideum as a cellular model that relies on chemotaxis toward a secreted chemoattractant, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) during the development phase of their life cycle to examine the roles of G protein palmitoylation and phosphorylation. The... Read More →
CB

Cordell Beaton

Major Biology, Minor Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
How Dietary Fats and Lipid Metabolites Affect Metabolic Health | | There are many different types of dietary fats consumed by people each day. Saturated fatty acids (SFA), omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA-06), and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA-03) all hav... Read More →
MB

Magdalena Blaszkiewicz

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Proper innervation of adipose tissue is required for maintenance of energy balance | | An important aspect of regulating energy expenditure is the transfer of signals from the brain through peripheral sympathetic nerves to activate lipolysis and thermogenesis in white and bro... Read More →
avatar for Erin Carter

Erin Carter

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Zebrafish as a Preclinical Model for Dystroglycanopathies Muscular dystrophies are heritable diseases characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Mutations in molecules that modify the dystroglycan protein cause a subset of muscular dystrophies known as secondary... Read More →
AE

Ana Eliza Souza Cunha

Biology/Pre-med, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Neuro-Immune Cross Talk And The Regulation Of Energy Balance | | Neuronal plasticity is the brain’s ability to undergo changes in neurogenesis, neuron survival, and neurite outgrowth from birth through adulthood, and is vital to both development of the brain and in recovery a... Read More →
JD

Jeanne DuShane

Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
MAPK-ERK Regulates Transcription of JC polyomavirus | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects more than half of the human population and presents as a persistent, lifelong infection in the kidney. In individuals who are immunosuppressed, JCPyV infection can lead to the onset of the fatal, demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Dynamic interactions between the virus and host cell factors are responsible for driving the infectious life cycle, yet the role of cellular signaling pathways that promote the infectious process remain poorly understood. Previous work demonstrated that the activation of the mitogen associated protein kinase (MAPK) component, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), occurs within minutes of viral attachment and entry into host cells. Our research has elucidated that both the presence and activation of MAPK-ERK is necessary for JCPyV infection. To determine whether ERK activation is essential for specific steps during JCPyV infection, cells were treated chemical inhibitors to reduce ERK activation, and the impact on JCPyV infectivity was assessed. We found that while ERK is activated during the early steps in infection, its activity is not necessary for viral attachment, entry, or trafficking. However, inhibition of ERK activation leads to a significant decrease in both viral gene expression and viral promoter activity as measured using qPCR and viral promoter reporter assays. Thus, MAPK-ERK activation is required for later steps in the viral life cycle including viral transcription. These findings provide a more complete understanding of viral reprograming of host cell signaling pathways like MAPK-ERK, in order to promote infection and viral pathogenesis. | | Faculty Mentor: Melissa... Read More →
avatar for Lindsey Fitzsimons

Lindsey Fitzsimons

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Detailed in vivo comparison of two Wnt1:Cre models in the investigation of a role for primary cilia of cardiac neural crest cells (cNCC) in heart development. | | PROJECT AIMS: Our laboratory has uncovered a unique cardiac phenotype resulting from the elimination of the prima... Read More →
EK

Elisabeth Kilroy

Biomedical Science and Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Answering the Unknowns: How Exercise Affects the Pathophysiology of Muscular Dystrophy | | Muscular dystrophy (MD) is defined as a group of neuromuscular diseases characterized by a loss in muscle mass, which results in progressive muscle weakness. It is caused by a genetic m... Read More →
SK

Sigrid Koizar

Biology, Pre-Med, Chemistry minor, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adipose Tissue | | Obesity and type 2 diabetes are conditions that lead to adipocyte hypertrophy and inflammation due to metabolic dysfunction. Proper neural innervation of adipose tissue is important for metabolic control. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a growth factor that we have identified in the stromovascular fraction of adipose tissue; it is secreted from the immune cells that reside alongside adipocytes within a fat depot. Neurotrophic factors promote neuron survival and plasticity, but the role of BDNF in adipose tissue is not understood. Using a transgenic mouse model (LysM-cre x BDNF flox) we knocked-out (KO) BDNF in myeloid lineage immune cells, a group that includes macrophages, which we predict secrete BDNF. We confirmed that this LysM-Cre-mediated deletion of BDNF resulted in a genetic denervation of subcutaneous white adipose tissue, but not other peripheral nerves. | By comparing effects of cold-stimulation (promotes neural activation and lipolysis) with high-fat diet (promotes adipose tissue hypertrophy), we have demonstrated that the BDNF KO mice are unable to properly mediate adipose tissue function. We have also demonstrated that the KO mice display the presence of cold-induced brown adipocytes in the subcutaneous fat depot... Read More →
CL

Conner Lajoie

Biochemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Identification and characterization of 5-HT2 receptor scaffolding proteins in JC polyomavirus infection | | The majority of the human population is infected with JC polyomavirus, which establishes an asymptomatic infection in the kidney. In immunosuppressed individuals the vi... Read More →
DM

David Maridas

Biomedical Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Parathyroid Hormone rescues bone loss induced by calorie restriction | | Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) can stimulate bone remodeling and increase bone density in humans and mice. In addition, when the PTH receptor was knocked out, mice accumulated marrow fat and PTH could also prevent adipogenesis in vitro. Thus, we postulated that the increase in marrow fat commonly reported in anorexia nervosa and in calorie-restricted mice could be prevented with treatment by PTH. We fed a cohort of 8-week-old mice the standard AIN93M diet. Another cohort was fed a diet with a 30% calorie restriction based on the daily food consumed by the control cohort. The calorie-restricted diet was specifically formulated to have all the nutrients and minerals after the 30% retrieval. Mice were injected subcutaneously and daily with PTH (1-34aa... Read More →
ZM

Zach Marin

Mathematics, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Wavelet-Based Particle Tracking In Unreconstructed, Off-Axis Holograms Ocean moons and planets, warmed by tidal forces, are a likely place to find extraterrestrial life. As such, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is conducting a search for life on Europa starting with flyby missions in the 2020s, and eventually progressing to landers. Landers will search tiny extremophiles, which are the likeliest living candidates to be found in harsh extraterrestrial environments. Motility is an accepted biosignature, and finding non-random motion in Europan ice samples will indicate presence of extraterrestrial life. Landers will thus be equipped with microscopes to image ice and subglacial ocean samples on Europa, with the intent of detecting motile organisms. A likely technology for these microscopes is holography, due to its ability to rapidly image full volumes of water without the need for mechanical focus on regions of interest, and its capture of both amplitude and phase information. Standard numerical focusing and reconstruction of hologram time series for detailed 3D particle tracking is slow and computationally expensive. Automatic motion detection and particle tracking is an unsolved problem in unreconstructed off-axis holograms. Our lab proposes an automated wavelet-based method of tracking particles in unreconstructed off-axis holograms to provide rough estimates of the presence of motion and particle trajectories in hologram time series. This will quickly identify motion in candidate time series, which can then be fully reconstructed for detailed 3D tracking of extraterrestrial extremophiles. | | Faculty Mentor: Andre... Read More →
EM

Elizabeth Mason

Biological Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Elucidating the Effects of Aging on Muscle | | Skeletal muscle serves many physiological functions; therefore, progressive loss of muscle with age, known as sarcopenia, negatively impacts health. Sarcopenia affects 50 million people, is associated with increased fracture risk and functional decline, and increases healthcare costs. Since augmenting muscle has the potential to delay age-related functional decline... Read More →
CM

Colleen Mayberry

Microbiology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
JC Polyomavirus Utilizes Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis for Infectious Entry | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) establishes a lifelong, persistent, asymptomatic primary infection in the kidney in the majority of the human population. In immunocompromised individuals JCPyV disseminates to secondary sites of infection including the central nervous system where it establishes a lytic infection and is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal, demyelinating disease. JCPyV attachment is mediated by the interaction of viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) with... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Morelli

Kathryn Morelli

Biomedical Science & Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A Personalized Gene Therapy Approach for Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease | | Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies affecting 1:2500 individuals worldwide. To date, fifteen different mutations in GARS (glycyl-tRNA synthetase) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant CMT Type 2D (CMT2D). Although the mechanisms through which mutant forms of GARS cause axon degeneration remain controversial, preliminary data from CMT2D patients and mouse models of the disease (GarsC201R/+ and GarsP278KY/+) suggest that the expression of mutant GARS may cause toxic gain-of-function effects in peripheral nerves. As such, the selective silencing of mutant GARS expression should benefit patients with this disorder. In response, we have developed a gene therapy strategy that reduces the expression of mutant Gars transcripts through allele-specific RNAi. To test the proof-of-principle of this approach, we developed self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors (scAAV9) expressing therapeutic microRNAs engineered to specifically silence the mutant mouse Gars allele, P278KY (referred to as mi.P278KY). Importantly, in vivo we found that, when injected at birth, scAAV9-mi.P278KY significantly improves gross motor function and prevents axon atrophy in adult GarsP278KY/+ mice. These data confirm that our gene therapy approach can prevent the onset of CMT2D-associated phenotypes. We are now testing the ability of scAAV9-mi.P278KY to arrest or reverse the neuropathy when delivered post-onset in GarsP278KY/+ mice, and to test efficacy of patient-specific vectors in... Read More →
AS

Ashley Soucy

Biochemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Intracellular Ca2+ Flux is Required for a Post-Attachment Step in JCPyV Infection | | JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) establishes an asymptomatic infection in the kidney of healthy individuals through peroral transmission. In severely immunocompromised individuals, JCPyV migrates to the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCPyV attachment is mediated by binding to... Read More →
ES

Ella Sulinski

Psychology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Oxytocin Response to Infant Stimulation is Impaired in Opioid Dependent Mothers Treatment for opioid dependence (MMT) affects the quality of the maternal-infant bond (Heller, 2013). In this study, mother-infant dyads (N=14) with MMT (n=7) and non-exposed dyads (n=7) from the sa... Read More →

Session Chair
MB

Magdalena Blaszkiewicz

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Proper innervation of adipose tissue is required for maintenance of energy balance | | An important aspect of regulating energy expenditure is the transfer of signals from the brain through peripheral sympathetic nerves to activate lipolysis and thermogenesis in white and bro... Read More →
avatar for Erin Carter

Erin Carter

Biomedical Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Zebrafish as a Preclinical Model for Dystroglycanopathies Muscular dystrophies are heritable diseases characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. Mutations in molecules that modify the dystroglycan protein cause a subset of muscular dystrophies known as secondary... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Morelli

Kathryn Morelli

Biomedical Science & Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A Personalized Gene Therapy Approach for Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease | | Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies affecting 1:2500 individuals worldwide. To date, fifteen different mutations in GARS (glycyl-tRNA synthetase) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant CMT Type 2D (CMT2D). Although the mechanisms through which mutant forms of GARS cause axon degeneration remain controversial, preliminary data from CMT2D patients and mouse models of the disease (GarsC201R/+ and GarsP278KY/+) suggest that the expression of mutant GARS may cause toxic gain-of-function effects in peripheral nerves. As such, the selective silencing of mutant GARS expression should benefit patients with this disorder. In response, we have developed a gene therapy strategy that reduces the expression of mutant Gars transcripts through allele-specific RNAi. To test the proof-of-principle of this approach, we developed self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors (scAAV9) expressing therapeutic microRNAs engineered to specifically silence the mutant mouse Gars allele, P278KY (referred to as mi.P278KY). Importantly, in vivo we found that, when injected at birth, scAAV9-mi.P278KY significantly improves gross motor function and prevents axon atrophy in adult GarsP278KY/+ mice. These data confirm that our gene therapy approach can prevent the onset of CMT2D-associated phenotypes. We are now testing the ability of scAAV9-mi.P278KY to arrest or reverse the neuropathy when delivered post-onset in GarsP278KY/+ mice, and to test efficacy of patient-specific vectors in... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Rooms 2-5

1:00pm

Oral Presentations – Engineering
Speakers
avatar for Libby Gorse

Libby Gorse

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantifying aquaculture’s effect on nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface in the Damariscotta estuary in Maine The importance of developing a sustainable aquaculture industry has been realized in the state of Maine. An extensive, interdisciplinary EPSCoR-funded project by the name of SEANET (Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network) is spearheading research on aquaculture from all fronts to reduce the rising pressure placed on wild marine species by the demands of a growing global population. The work presented here involves the determination of the rate at which organic biodeposits resulting from bivalve aquaculture operations can safely be added to the underlying sediment, establishing the carrying capacity of the sediment with respect to aquaculture practice. We have designed flux chambers that hold intact sediment cores immersed in seawater, mimicking environmental conditions for the study of nutrient cycling and flux at the sediment-water interface. Three major hypotheses are tested: (1) biodeposits high in carbon and nitrogen content increase nutrient flux to the water column; (2) fine-grained sediments contain more organic matter and support lower mineralization rates of biodeposits than coarse-grained sediments; and (3) polychaetes lower the efflux of nutrients from the sediment. The Damariscotta estuary has been identified as a critical site to understand due to its suitability for aquaculture. The extrapolation of our data will help future aquaculturists and policy makers to make informed decisions. | | Faculty Mentor: Aria... Read More →
JL

John Larsen

math major, physics minor, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Homotopy Type Theory, Univalent Foundations of Mathematics | | Homotopy type theory (HoTT) is a foundation to mathematics alternative from the standard Zermelo-Frankel set theory with the axiom of choice (ZFC set theory). It stems from ideas in type theory as well ideas in homotopy theory (a branch of topology), and combines the two in its own original way. We will first focus on type theory which, by itself, could also be an alternative to ZFC set theory; and that will prepare us for an introduction to homotopy type theory. Along the way I will show some results from both fields, as well as connections between them and ZFC set theory as I see appropriate. | | Faculty Mentor: George... Read More →
ZL

Zhilong Liu

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantification of Aquaculture Farm Drag Based on the Momentum Sink Method | | The demand of aquaculture will increase in the future, which presents an economic opportunity for farm expansion. In order to ensure sustainable growth for both the industry and the ecosystem, an important consideration is the flow response from larger farms. This work aims to quantify the friction caused by oyster farms using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model predicted the flow response of a case study oyster farm in the Damariscotta River. The simulation provided the flow reduction and turbulence induced by the farm. A drag coefficient was derived based on the momentum sink induced by the oyster farm and will be used in the future to predict the impact of larger farms through theoretical and regional scale numerical model techniques. The outcome of these combined efforts will provide guidance for sustainable farm expansion in the future. | | Faculty Mentor: Kimberly... Read More →
AM

Anin Maskay

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SAW Static Strain Sensor for High Temperature Applications | | The measurement of static strain in harsh environment, in particular at temperatures beyond 100ºC, is highly desirable in multiple applications such as power plants, industrial manufacturing, and aerospace. The aforementioned industries have a high demand for small, robust, stable sensors that can operate wirelessly, without a battery or power source, and require minimal maintenance for structural health monitoring and condition based maintenance. The technologies that currently exist face multiple challenges related to sensor endurance, size, complexity, and system integrability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology is a technology that has shown promise in a multitude of sensing applications because of its characteristics such as small size, ease of mass production, robustness, battery-free, and wireless capability. In this research work, SAW sensors fabricated using thin film fabrication techniques on langasite employing platinum alloy based electrodes have been exposed to temperatures up to... Read More →
CM

Chitra Manjanai Pandian

Electrical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
WATER QUALITY MONITORING AND DATA ANALYSIS USING SOLAR POWERED WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS | | Storm water runoff pollution has been identified as a major environmental and health safety issue worldwide. In order to ensure health safety, water quality monitoring is necessary. Tr... Read More →
avatar for Berkay Payal

Berkay Payal

Electrical Engineering/Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Determining Honey Bee Colony Health Using RF and Radar Techniques Determining Honey Bee Colony Health Using RF and Radar Techniques Berkay Payal Advisor: Nuri W. Emanetoglu Herbert Aumann, Frank Drummond Abstract The sudden disappearance of honey bees, commonly referred to as Colony Collapse Disorder (CDD), is a global problem that threatens agriculture. Honey bees pollinate more than 80% of US agricultural plants. In CCD, worker bees suddenly disappear and do not come back to their hives, leaving behind the queen and immature bees. In order to study bee colony health, a 5.8 GHz radio frequency (RF) instrument was designed, built and used to monitor bee hives, in particular to provide an early warning for CCD. This system was used in reflective (Doppler radar) mode to measure bee activity and to listen to the hive remotely. When pointed to the bee hive entrance, the Doppler shift due to the flight of individual bees could be detected. An interface circuit performing filtering operations along with power management circuit were constructed, tested and integrated in the RF system. After testing the complete setup in the lab, the system was deployed in the field. Both the attenuated and modulated signals were collected using two Arduino Nano development boards and saved to microSD cards. The data collected due to bee activity was processed via MATLAB and the results were compared with visual observations of bee keepers. Radar data showed that flying bees beat their wings between 200 to 250 beats-per-second. A novel audio signature was discovered in the 100 to 150 Hz range, and has been attributed to bees fanning the hive for cooling during the day and heating during the night through visual inspection. | | Faculty Mentor: Nuri... Read More →
MR

Mark Royer

Computer Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A Java class loading extension to support units-of-measurement error detection | | This project investigates dynamic class-loading techniques for | integrating units of measurement in Java. Software errors can manifest | themselves in any programming language due to semantic (or syntactic) | ambiguity. Ignoring information surrounding units can lead to | disastrous failures in computer systems. One notable failure was the | unit conversion mishap that caused the crash of the NASA Mars Climate | Orbiter in 1998. The crash occurred because English measurements were | not converted into the correct metric types. While disturbing (and | calamitous), there are many times in software systems where errors of | this type do not fail in such a spectacular fashion. Instead, what | often occurs is that unit conversion errors are not realized in | mission critical systems for some time. Only after an extended run of | the system, the program will fail with cryptic or no explanation. Or | perhaps even worse, the system will continue to operate with values | that seem correct, but are in fact erroneous. There have been a | number of proposals and projects throughout the years that have | attempted to incorporate units into the Java programming language, but | at this time, measurement units have not been added to the core Java | API. This feasibility study incorporates some of the techniques that | have been implemented by others and investigates units of measurement | class-loading mechanisms. The final result is a library that enhances | measurement unit support in Java applications. | | Faculty Mentor: Sudarshan... Read More →
RZ

Razieh Zangeneh

Mechanical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Design and Construction of a Froude Scaled Model DTMB 5415 Hull Form at University of Maine | | The Marine, Ocean, and Offshore Research Group at the University of Maine, in cooperation with faculty and students from the University of Maine, the University of Southern Maine, Maine Maritime Academy, as well as industry professionals from General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, formed a working group in May of 2016 that was tasked with the design and fabrication of a Froude scaled model DTMB 5415. The primary goals of the project were to foster a working relationship among these partners, as well as develop and construct a model DTMB 5415 to be utilized as a validation case for the implementation of a towing carriage to be installed in the state of the art Alfond W2 Ocean Engineering Lab, located at the Advanced Structures and Composites Center on the University of Maine campus. The DTMB 5415 is a hull form for a naval surface combatant that features the incorporation of both a transom stern and a sonar dome, and is well regarded amongst naval architectural circles. | | Faculty Mentor: Krish... Read More →

Session Chair
avatar for Libby Gorse

Libby Gorse

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Quantifying aquaculture’s effect on nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface in the Damariscotta estuary in Maine The importance of developing a sustainable aquaculture industry has been realized in the state of Maine. An extensive, interdisciplinary EPSCoR-funded project by the name of SEANET (Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network) is spearheading research on aquaculture from all fronts to reduce the rising pressure placed on wild marine species by the demands of a growing global population. The work presented here involves the determination of the rate at which organic biodeposits resulting from bivalve aquaculture operations can safely be added to the underlying sediment, establishing the carrying capacity of the sediment with respect to aquaculture practice. We have designed flux chambers that hold intact sediment cores immersed in seawater, mimicking environmental conditions for the study of nutrient cycling and flux at the sediment-water interface. Three major hypotheses are tested: (1) biodeposits high in carbon and nitrogen content increase nutrient flux to the water column; (2) fine-grained sediments contain more organic matter and support lower mineralization rates of biodeposits than coarse-grained sediments; and (3) polychaetes lower the efflux of nutrients from the sediment. The Damariscotta estuary has been identified as a critical site to understand due to its suitability for aquaculture. The extrapolation of our data will help future aquaculturists and policy makers to make informed decisions. | | Faculty Mentor: Aria... Read More →
AM

Anin Maskay

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SAW Static Strain Sensor for High Temperature Applications | | The measurement of static strain in harsh environment, in particular at temperatures beyond 100ºC, is highly desirable in multiple applications such as power plants, industrial manufacturing, and aerospace. The aforementioned industries have a high demand for small, robust, stable sensors that can operate wirelessly, without a battery or power source, and require minimal maintenance for structural health monitoring and condition based maintenance. The technologies that currently exist face multiple challenges related to sensor endurance, size, complexity, and system integrability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology is a technology that has shown promise in a multitude of sensing applications because of its characteristics such as small size, ease of mass production, robustness, battery-free, and wireless capability. In this research work, SAW sensors fabricated using thin film fabrication techniques on langasite employing platinum alloy based electrodes have been exposed to temperatures up to... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Rooms 5-6

1:00pm

Poster Presentations – Education
Speakers
HD

Hope Duncanson

Education, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Reaching Local Community with the Message of Developmental Milestones and Early Identification of Autism | | Autism rates in the United States are increasing, early identification aids in children accessing interventions. “Act Early. Know the Signs.” materials highlight child development and signs of developmental delay. This pilot project was conducted to determine if distributing... Read More →
JG

Jenessa Grant

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Maine Coalition for Quality Housing and Services Timeline | | This leadership project was completed as part of the UNH-UMaine Leadership and Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (NH-ME-LEND) program. The purpose of my project was to assist the Maine Coalition for Quality Housing and Services (MCQHS) in expanding their online... Read More →
TK

Toni Kaplan

New Media, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Development of a Dynamic Multisensory Interface To Provide Accessible Biological Diagrams for Blind and Low Vision Students | | According to the Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey, there are approximately 543,893 children with significant visual impairment in the U.S. For these children much of the mainstream classroom learning materials are inaccessible, and adapted educational materials are required to meet these... Read More →
SK

Sierra Kuun

Chemical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A STUDY OF UNDERGRADUATE PERCEPTION AND BEHAVIOR TOWARD ON-CAMPUS COMPOSTING | | Composting among college students can promote a healthy environment and encourage the appropriate disposal method for generated organic wastes. The purpose of this study was to observe composting behaviors and attitudes among students and foster an increase in knowledge of suitable composting behavior in on-campus apartments. Waste management issues are quickly becoming a key societal concern. As a result, there has been extensive literature surrounding the benefits of, and factors leading to, pro-environmental behaviors. What specific factors lead an individual, institution, or community to begin composting? In analyzing research on related topics, we can investigate drivers that are transferable to increase composting participation. | | Faculty Mentor: Travis... Read More →
TL

Thomas Leighton

Electrical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Investigation and Development of New Sensor Laboratory | | The ECE department at UMaine offers two courses focused on sensors: ECE 465, which provides an introduction to sensors, and ECE 466 Sensor Technology and Instrumentation, which has the goal to expand upon the introduc... Read More →
AO

Amber Oakes

Human Development, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Role of Pets and their Effect on The Well-Being of Families | | The goal of this exploratory study is to examine the role and function of pets on the well-being of family systems. Pets have been widely regarded as members of the family unit, yet little research has focused on their role in the well-being of families in the academic arena. This study will explore issues such as the function of pets in reducing anxiety in times of family stress or relationship strain. In order to examine our research question, we are conducting in-depth qualitative interviews with 2-3 individuals about the role of pets in their families. This study is currently undergoing data collection; findings will be shared at the symposium... Read More →
MP

Margaret Pierce

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Evaluation of the Maine Child Development Services-Part C Improvement Plan | | In this project, as part of the New Hampshire-Maine Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program and in conjunction with Maine’s Child Development Services-Part C (CDS-Part C), I assisted in evaluating the State Systemic Implementation Plan (SSIP) Phase III. The SSIP, an added requirement to the State Performance Plan, is a multi-year, three phase plan that describes how Maine will improve outcomes for children with disabilities served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. CDS-Part... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom

1:00pm

Poster Presentations – Natural Sciences
Speakers
CA

Cheyenne Adams

Marine Biology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Seasonal Feeding and Growth of the Eastern Oyster in the Damariscotta River Estuary, Maine Production on oyster farms depends on the quantity and quality of the planktonic food, including phytoplankton and detritus, available at the site. This research, part of the Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) program, is investigating seasonal variation in the nutritional quality of suspended particulates and associated feeding and | | growth responses of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). From May through October 2016, bi-weekly water sampling was conducted in an intensively farmed segment of the Damariscotta River Estuary. Multiple water quality parameters were measured, including temperature, salinity, turbidity, chlorophyll... Read More →
HA

Hillary Albert

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type: Encouraging Communication and Nutrition through Animal Assisted Therapy | | This literature review examines the implementation of Animal Assisted Therapy for people diagnosed with Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type. Animal Assisted Therapy is when a professional such as a medical provider chooses to implement human-animal interaction as part of a treatment plan for one or more of their clients. Dementia of the... Read More →
ZB

Zachary Beaudry

Wildlife Ecology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Nest Attendance as an Indicator of Daily Probability of Nest Survival in Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson’s (Ammodramus nelsoni) Sparrows. Reduced parental investment in songbirds has been hypothesized to be either a bet-hedging strategy to maximize life-time repr... Read More →
WB

William Breeding

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45 AM-12:00PM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Photocatalysis of Atrazine by various Bismuth Oxyhalides: Rates, Mechanisms and Byproducts (Section F Poster 22, 1:00PM-2:15PM) | | Atrazine has been found to be one of the most prevalent pollutant in worldwide water systems. Typically a result of herbicide runoff, the harmful environmental impacts of the compound cause novel methods of treatment to gain interest, such as photocatalysis. Photocatalysis involves the addition of a catalyst and light source for enhanced degradation of pollutants, and offers an efficient method for atrazine treatment in water. Bismuth oxyhalides (BiOX) have previously been investigated by the Patterson Research Group as catalysts for the degradation of atrazine, as results have shown comparable degradation rates to EPA photocatalytic standards. BiOX compounds will be doped with various nonmetals in attempt to enhance photocatalytic activity. The goal of this project is to assess various BiOX based... Read More →
HC

Heather Clifford

Climate & Quaternary Studies, 1:00PM-2:15PM
To improve our understanding of past climate we investigate glaciochemical records preserved in ~1-Ma old4 ice recovered from the 125.64 -126.31 m depth interval at the BIT-58 site in the Allan Hills Blue Ice area of Antarctica. Due to the complex ice flow in this area, the climate signal is too highly compressed to adequately sample with low resolution, melt-based methods. We instead use novel high and ultra-high resolution instruments to continuously sample and analyze the environmental signal preserved within the ancient ice. | | Faculty Mentor: Paul... Read More →
KC

Kara Costanza

Forest Resources, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Supporting Women in Forestry Today (SWIFT): Small-scale Discussions with Large-scale Implications | | Forestry is still a male-dominated field. Yet the profession has gained an increasing number of women, many of whom are striving to succeed and find their place within the discipline. Using a U.S. Forest Service model, a group of women faculty and students from the University of... Read More →
KD

Kailey Dowd

nursing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping | | Numerous studies have been performed to test whether early umbilical cord clamping in premature infants less than 36 weeks gestational age is beneficial. In order to test this theory, an extensive literature review was performed by combining the key-words premature infants and umbilical cord clamping in the CINAHL and Cochrane databases. This search yielded four articles that met the inclusion criteria. These articles were composed of two systematic reviews and two randomized control studies. A total of 817 patients participated. Results of each study showed beneficial hemodynamic effects for the patients who underwent delayed cord clamping of 30... Read More →
CG

Chase Gagne

Wildlife Ecology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Hydrology and Insect Communities of Riverine Rock Pools | | Small pools on rock outcrops are a common feature on the banks of Maine rivers, however the unique aquatic insects inhabiting these rock pools have been little studied. This is problematic, as climate change is altering seasonal river flooding and rainfall patterns that may control pool filling and drying. These changes may impact potentially unique species in these pools, or make them more susceptible to invasion by disease vectors such as mosquitos. This project surveyed the insect communities of 40 natural pools in a rocky outcrop on the Penobscot River near Milford. The pools were spread between four zones: two zones that were close to the river and two zones that were out of the range of summer flooding. It was found that the pools were influenced by their distance to the river. Pools that were close to the river were dominated by river-dwelling taxa and pools that were farther from the river were dominated by mosquito and midge larvae. Therefore, changes in river flow regimes and rainfall patterns are likely to affect the structure of these unique insect communities. | | Faculty Mentor: Hamish... Read More →
CG

Charles Giammarco

Food Science and Human Nutrition, Concentration in Food Science, Minor in Microbiology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Seaweed Extracts for use in Reduced Sodium Foods | | There is an epidemic in the United States relating to the high rate of high blood pressure, caused in part by the over consumption of sodium in the average American diet. The objective of this research project is to reduce sodium content in foods through replacement with seaweed extracts. Our methodology includes the production of aqueous extracts from a selection of local and internationally sourced seaweeds. These include dulse and sugar kelp, two Maine seaweeds, and Pacific kombu, a well-established sea vegetable used in Asian cuisine. The extractions are performed by soaking seaweed in a room temperature water bath for 2 hours followed by a hot water soak for 30 minutes at... Read More →
KG

Kayla Greenawalt

Ecology and Environmental Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Identifying Pollen of Native Grasses from the Falkland Islands to Build a Reference Collection | | Grasslands of the Falkland Islands are the dominant vegetation and teeming with unique wildlife such as seabirds and marine mammals. The grasses serve an important role by protecting the ground from erosion, providing food for livestock, sheltering animals from the persistent winds, and are critical breeding habitat for many of the... Read More →
AH

Amalia Harrington

Marine Biology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Effects of ocean acidification on the physiology of subadult American lobsters (Homarus americanus) | | Increases in anthropogenic input of CO2 into the atmosphere has caused widespread patterns of ocean warming (OW) and ocean acidification (OA). Both processes will likely have major impacts on commercially important species, but OA may pose a particular threat to marine calcifying invertebrates. In the State of Maine, commercial fisheries landings are valued in excess of $600 million, the majority of which is sustained by the American lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery. Previous research explored the effects of OA and OW on larval lobsters, but little work has focused on subadult or adult stages. We present preliminary results of a short-term study exploring physiological impacts of OA on subadults. We used Honeywell Durafet pH electrodes in combination with a... Read More →
JH

Jamie Haverkamp

Anthropology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Learning from the past to mitigate future impacts on North American agricultural systems | | Food security has emerged as a major challenge in the 21st century and is anticipated to ensue beyond the next 50 years. Agriculture is highly dependent on climatic and social context... Read More →
DH

David Hersom

Nursing, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Importance of Personal Self-Care in Reducing Nursing Burnout Rates | | PICO Question: | Among nurses, does emphasizing personal self-care (exercise, healthy diet, relaxation, and appropriate breaks during one's shift) reduce rates of burnout compared to a lack of self-ca... Read More →
NM

Natalie M. Holbrook

Psychology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Mediating Role of Negative Problem Orientation and Impulsive/Careless Problem-Solving in the Link Between Perceived Stress and Irritable Bowel Symptom Severity | | Having a negative problem orientation (NPO; viewing problems as unsolvable) or an impulsive/careless problem-solving style (ICS; making careless and hurried attempts) plays a significant mediating role in the negative impact of stressful life events on wellbeing (e.g., depression, anxiety; physical health problems... Read More →
LI

Lucy Iselborn

Nursing Major, Psychology Minor, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Contraceptive Counseling Practices Among Providers Prescribing Opiates to Women of Childbearing Age | | Opioid use has reached epidemic levels in the United States, resulting in 28,647 deaths in 2014 alone (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2016). The risks associated with opioid use are much higher for pregnant women due to the detrimental effects on the developing fetus, including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Symptoms of NAS include: mottled skin, high-pitched crying, hyperactive reflexes, irritability, poor feeding, rapid breathing, tremors and seizures, and occur because the baby is withdrawing from opioids (Yazda, Desai... Read More →
TJ

Teaka Jackson

Food Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Effects of Blanching on Sea Vegetable | | Antioxidants are essential to human life due to their ability to eliminate free radicals, which can damage cellular processes. Consumption of seaweed is becoming more common in the United States, primarily because of the nutritional benefits associated with its consumption. Previous research has shown that red and brown seaweed species contain a variety of antioxidants, such as polyphenols and catechins, however the effects of processing on seaweed antioxidants has not been well characterized. | The objective of this study was to determine how blanching affects antioxidant levels in Gracilaria. Gracilaria is a red sea vegetable farm-raised in Maine. Blanching is a common heat treatment used for preserving the color and texture of vegetables. It involves placing vegetables into hot water for a short period, then immediately immersing them in ice water. Although blanching denatures enzymes which cause quality loss in vegetables, the thermal processing may destroy phytochemicals that contribute to antioxidant activity. | Gracilaria samples were blanched in boiling water for 0 (control), 5, 30 and 60 seconds, packaged, and then refrigerated for 11 days. This process was performed in triplicate and samples were analyzed on day 1, 4, 8, and 11 of storage. Samples were extracted in 60% methanol over a 24-hour period. Total phenolic content, ferric reducing antioxidant power and radical scavenging (with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assays were performed to study the different mechanisms associated with antioxidant capacity of the Gracilaria. The data are currently being subjected to analysis of variance and... Read More →
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Ashlin Jalbert

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Picture Exchange Communication System and Nonverbal Children with Autism | | The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) device commonly used amongst non-verbal children on the autism spectrum. The present review dis... Read More →
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Hallie Marshall

Wildlife Ecology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Perception of the horizon predicts bird abundance better than habitat size in a tidal marsh species of conservation concern - The Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus) is a species of tidal marsh bird facing rapid population decline throughout its range. A major cause of this decline is loss of summer breeding habitat, and thus there is a need to preserve coastal marshes in the northeastern United States. To do so requires an understanding of the habitat features that support robust populations. In other grassland bird species, habitat patches with low horizons are preferred to those with tall objects (e.g., trees, telephone poles, wind turbines). This study tests how the abundance of Saltmarsh Sparrows in marshes is affected by the maximum height of objects in the horizon of marshes from Maine to Virginia. Abundance data were collected via point count surveys at 1,586 points during the summer breeding season of 2012. At each of these points, a clinometer was used to determine the height of objects in the horizon. Previous studies have shown increases in Saltmarsh Sparrow abundance with marsh size increases. Our study has found that the angle to the maximum horizon, which considers a... Read More →
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Laura Mattas

Earth and Climate Science, 1:00PM-2:15PM
SURFACE-BASED GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR PROFILES OF THE JUNEAU ICEFIELD, ALASKA: COMPARISON OF ANNUAL SIGNALS IN THE 2012 AND 2015 TEMPERATE SNOWPACK | | We recorded ~180 km of 400 MHz common offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles over the temperate Juneau Icefield dur... Read More →
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Anna McGinn

Climate Change Institute and School for Policy and International Affairs, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Origins of the Anthropocene in Maine and the Northeast | | In 2016, an international group of leading geologists recommended adding a new epoch in Earth’s time scale - the “Anthropocene” - defined by the primacy of human activity in controlling global climate. While the Anthropocene is globally defined, the onset may be spatially asynchronous. We use Maine as a case study to consider the relative degrees to which local, regional, and global human activity influenced... Read More →
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Kayla Michaud

Economics, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Energy-Smart Bangor Residential Rebate Program Presentation | | Energy-Smart Bangor Residential Rebate Program Presentation Poster | Judging Category: Undergraduate Student | Date submitted: 3/2/2017 | Presenter’s email address: kayla.michaud@maine.edu | | Authors... Read More →
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Haley Netherton

Zoology, Wildlife Ecology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Nexus of Environmental Enrichment, Public Perceptions, and Education for Captive Grizzly Bears | | Animals living in captive environments face a different set of challenges from their wild counterparts. Because they live in a limited physical space and need expend only li... Read More →
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Mariah Radue

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Little Ice Age in New England | | The Little Ice Age is a period characterized by abrupt decreases in global temperatures and shifts in climatic and environmental conditions. Based on ice cores and other climate records, the Little Ice Age is believed to have occurred during the timespan of 1300-1850. While climate changes during this recent event were spatially and temporally heterogeneous, temperatures in the North Atlantic were generally about 2 degrees Celsius below average, and glaciers expanded in North America, Europe, and Asia. These climatic shifts shaped the experience of human inhabitants in the region who faced famines and unpredictable weather events. For example, an extraordinarily cold summer in 1816, known as the... Read More →
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Charles Rodda

Climate Change Institute, School of Earth and Climate Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
2,000 years of climate change in Central Asia | | We synthesize 2,000 years of paleoclimate proxy records from Central Asia, examine weather station data from 600 Central Asian stations active since the beginning of the twentieth century, and compare climate reanalysis model... Read More →
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Baidehi Roy

Forest Resources, 1:00PM-2:15PM
A comparative analysis of ecosystem services in Maine | | Natural resources, especially forests, contribute a significant amount of the goods and services produced in the Maine economy. The ecosystem services (ES) framework provides a useful way to compare both market and non-market goods and services across different locations or regions, in order to holistically view the benefits of natural resources accruing to particular places. This poster displays preliminary results from mapping the distribution of a selection of ES indicators in order to understand their proportional availability for different locations in Maine. Areas of ES provision were calculated using 25-miles radii around county centroids, calculated in ArcMap GIS software. Measures of ES include water availability, forest harvest, recreation, preserved lands, and carbon storage. Results compare the bundles of ES provision for 16 locations across the state. Future work will expand on the relationship between ES provision and human community outcomes for these locations. Results will help policy makers in the utilization of the natural potential of local ecosystems for long term sustainable development in Maine. | | Faculty Mentor: Mindy... Read More →
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Madeline Sanborn

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
The Effects of a Stroke on the Brain Organization of Deaf American Sign Language Users | | This literature review explores the relationship between the language organization of the deaf brain and the effects of a stroke. It takes into consideration the side effects of a stroke on a hearing brain, and how it compares to the effects of a stroke on a deaf brain. Specialized areas of the brain, such as... Read More →
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Grace Scott

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Optimizing extractions of recalcitrant polyphenols in Maine seaweed | | Seaweed has been used for centuries as a health beneficial, whole food source. Recent research has linked specific benefits, including anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects, to bioactive molecules such as... Read More →
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Brendan Smith

Food Science and Human Nutrition, 1:00PM-2:15PM
University of Maine Walkability/Bikeability Audit | | The focus of this study was to assess and grade the walkability/bikeability paths in a 1.5 mile radius around the University of Maine campus. This project was part of a 14-state study, Get Fruved, a USDA funded project for health promotion on college campuses. At UMaine, 4 student researchers conducted an environmental audit on 39 paths (75% in the day, 25% at night), selected by a campus committee as most frequently used walking/biking paths. The Centers for Disease Control and... Read More →
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Wenjing Sun

Forest resources, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Manufacturing Renewable Composites using Cellulose Nanofibrils and Fungus Mycelia as Binder | | This study aims to produce a novel all-renewable hybrid composite panel using softwood particles, cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and fungus mycelia. CNF, currently produced on pilot scale by the University of Maine has been successfully used as a complete replacement of urea-formaldehyde resin in the formulation of traditional particleboard. The produced panels have mechanical properties similar to those of conventional particleboard with the additional advantage of being added-formaldehyde free. Mycelium is the vegetative part of a fungus, which can also act as a binder to produce particleboard. Mycelium-based particleboard has been commercialized by Ecovative Design and has the additional advantage of being Class-A fire resistant. The hybrid panel we produced is expected to have improved physical and mechanical properties and inherent fire resistance. | | Faculty Mentor: Mehdi... Read More →
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Chelsea Sutton

Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Treatment Methods Of Tinnitus | | Tinnitus, the perception of buzzing or ringing of the ear, affects nearly 50 million individuals in the United States, 20% of whom are considered to have a severe case. The disorder ranges from mild to severe, however the symptoms can be so strenuous that the quality of life is affected. Although tinnitus is incurable there are different methods of treatments, such as sound therapy and cognitive behavior modification therapy (CBT), that aim to restore the... Read More →
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Emma Taccardi

Marine biology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Can stable isotopes indicate the geographical origins of sea lice? | | The salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis is the primary parasitic disease of salmon aquaculture and affects populations of both wild and farmed fish. Despite the current understanding of its detrimental effects on host salmonids, its complete life history strategy remains uncertain. The current study investigated the distribution of sea lice in Maine through stable isotope analysis (SIA). Louse populations were collected from farmed Atlantic salmon in Cobscook Bay and from wild salmon at the Milford Dam to determine if the isotopic signatures of lice from different fish stocks were unique. Preliminary studies experimented with processing protocols to establish the most efficient method for sea lice SIA. Further analysis of... Read More →
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Benjamin Tero

Biochemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Pretty in Pink: How Gordonia Bacteriophage Flapper Contributes to Phage Diversity | | Bacteriophage (phage), viruses that infect bacteria, are the most abundant biological entity in the world. Despite having only 178 sequenced genomes in the phagesdb.org database, Gordonia phage bacteriophage show greater diversity than Mycobacteria phage for which 1,354 genomes have been sequenced. To understand relationships between these diverse phage, they are sorted into clusters based on genome structure and nucleotide sequence. The novel Gordonia phage Flapper belongs to cluster CR and has a genome length of 67,527 base pairs with 96 predicted genes. Flapper forms lysogens in the host Gordonia terrae, meaning it remains dormant in the host and possibly integrates its genome into the host genome. There is no evidence, however, of genes in the Flapper genome that are essential for lysogeny, such as an integrase gene which facilitates integration of the phage genome into the host genome... Read More →
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Joshua Villazana

Entomology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Black Soldier Fly Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) and The Future Alternative to Aqua Feed & Seafood Waste Management in Maine | | There are over 120,000 fly species on the planet and many are known to be a nuisance. However, some flies are well suited for remediati... Read More →
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Christian Zwirner

Biochemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Defensive Mechanisms of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Host Response to Candida albicans Infection | | This project involves an analysis of the defensive roles of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell-surface receptor linked to epithelial cell proliferation that is targeted is many cancer therapies, in response to Candida albicans infection. Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that can cause mucosal candidiasis and life threatening disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. Our ultimate goal is to answer specific questions about how EGFR protects against mucosal candidiasis using a zebrafish model developed in the Wheeler lab at the University of Maine. It is speculated that EGFR may regulate epithelial barrier homeostasis, upregulate mucus production, and recruit neutrophils; however, very few studies have been conducted to support these claims. In this study, AG-1478, an EGFR inhibitor, was used to assess the... Read More →

Judges
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Amy Baron

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, School of Biology and Ecology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Bird Abundance in the Rockweed Habitat along the Maine Coast | | Along the Maine coast, rockweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) is the dominant primary producers in the sheltered rocky intertidal areas and provides many essential ecological services to the intertidal ecosystem. Rockweed biomass supports organisms through direct grazing and additions to the detrital food web. Its complex three-dimensional structure not only provides invertebrates with protection from heat, desiccation, and predation at low tide but also a predation refuge for juvenile fishes. Moreover, rockweed provides habitat and a foraging site for coastal birds, such as Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), which forage for invertebrates in the expanded floating canopy. A strong linkage between rockweed and marine invertebrates has been shown; however, less is known about the ecological values of rockweed habitats to vertebrates, particularly birds. To understand the importance of rockweed for coastal birds, I conducted bird and algae surveys along the entire coast of Maine between June and September 2016. Bird counts were modeled as a function of the species composition of the macroalgal community (i.e., rockweed Ascophyllum nodosum versus other macroalgal species such as Fucus spp., bare rock or other substrates), geographic region, shoreline exposure, wind and wave conditions, precipitation, calendar day, and tidal cycle. On average, bird use of the intertidal zone was higher in areas with greater coverage of rockweed. These results may have implications for the ecological effects of rockweed harvest for commercial use. | | Faculty Mentor: Brian... Read More →
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Audrey Bergeron

Biochemistry, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Candida and Pseudomonas Interact to Enhance Infection in Transparent Zebrafish | | Infections comprised of multiple microbial species, such as bacteria and fungi, are called “mixed infections” and present a significant burden in hospitals, often complicating patient treatment... Read More →
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Destin Black

Intermedia, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Untitled | | My project explores the intersection of art and science to encourage viewers to look at art and data more carefully and critically. The project will contain diverse methodologies and mediums. The resulting work will produce a multi-media work for display. | | Faculty Mentor: Owen... Read More →
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Robert Boenish

Marine Biology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Dynamics of effective effort in a dynamic trap fishery: Maine American lobster (Homarus americanus) Utilization and interpretation of fishery-dependent data presents issues due to statistical difficulties associated with non-random sampling. A standardized framework is developed in this study for estimating Maine, USA, American Lobster (Homarus americanus) effective effort (individual trap hauls) on a fixed spatiotemporal scale using fishery-dependent data. We employ environmental covariates in a two-stage generalized additive model framework and non-parametrically bootstrap to standardize lobster catch per unit effort (CPUE) and estimate confidence intervals for the years 2006-2013. Bootstrapped CPUE confidence intervals are combined with high resolution landings data to estimate confidence intervals of effective lobster effort. In all study years we found the peak of effective effort preceded the peak of landings. Coast-wide from 2006-2013, effective effort increased modestly (9.1%) while landings increased dramatically (69.6%), suggesting assessment of spatiotemporal fishery dynamics may provide important insights for future management in Maine. Characteristic east-west differences in catch and effort were present in all study years, further suggesting non-stationarity of biological, temporal, and geographic processes in the Maine Lobster fishery. | | Faculty Mentor: Yong... Read More →
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Andrew Galimberti

Entomology, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Mineral Oil as a Tool in Integrated Pest Management of Potato | | Mineral oil is an organic petroleum-based pesticide which has a variety of uses in pest management. It has been used as an insecticide in several crops, primarily against small, soft-bodied insects. It is also... Read More →
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Caitlin Howell

Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM
Plasma patterned infused paper substrates for controlled bacterial adhesion | | Patterning substrates to create regions of varying surface chemistry for biological adhesion plays a key role in diagnostics and in vitro bioassays. However, problems a
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Molly Miller

Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 10:45AM-12:00PM
Title: Round Table examining fisheries co-management across Maine’s geographic and cultural contexts: Maine’s intertidal aquaculture industry (Room 6 Presenter 3) | | The Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) utilizes Ostrom’s social-ecological systems framework to conduct research designed to improve and further develop aquaculture in Maine. Community-based intertidal aquaculture has the potential to diversify... Read More →


Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom

1:00pm

Poster Presentations – Physical Sciences
Speakers
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Robert Arthur

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Mechanisms of Photocatalytic Degradation of Ibuprofen | | Renewed interest in deep space travel has created a need for support systems that can sustain human life for long periods of time. One critical component will be energy efficient water purification systems. Due to closed loop recycling systems pharmaceuticals have the potential to accumulate over time in water supplies and have negative health effects on astronauts. Removal of these compounds is critical for mission success, but since energy availability is limited in space, an energy efficient solution must be adopted. Recently, photocatalysis has emerged as an effective method for elimination of pharmaceuticals from water. Photocatalysis utilizes semiconductor materials that absorb ultraviolet and visible light to generate reactive radical species that oxidize and break down pollutants. The Patterson Group has been investigating the photocatalytic degradation of ibuprofen by two different photocatalysts: titanium dioxide (TiO2) and bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl). We have observed that... Read More →
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Aaron Bissonnette

Chemical Engineering, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Synthesis of Carbohydrate Chains | | Carbohydrates, sugars, are a type of important biological macromolecule. In order for carbohydrates to be utilized in diagnosing, preventing and curing diseases, scientists need large enough samples of the carbohydrates to study. It is difficult to obtain adequate samples of specific carbohydrates, since they are complex molecules that have many different ways in which the atoms and chemical bonds can be positioned and orientated. | | In order to investigate the automation of carbohydrates, an attempt to efficiently synthesize carbohydrate chains was undertaken. By tethering the carbohydrates together, we hypothesize that more efficient and selective reactions can be conducted. To investigate this hypothesis, glycosyl thiols were synthesized from the reducing sugar in 3 step and 41% yield. They were reacted with halo-silylethers obtained from precursor alcohols in 3 steps and 10% yield. The desired precursors were obtained in... Read More →
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Antonia Carroll

Chemistry, International Affairs, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Tungsten oxide as an electro-catalyst for the electrolysis of water and the reduction of carbon dioxide | | The electro-catalytic properties of tungsten oxide (WO3) were analyzed for the electrochemical reduction of CO2. Techniques for the synthesis of hexagonal WO3 nanocrystals were first explored. Hexagonal nanowires with surface areas exceeding 100 m2/g and possessing both... Read More →
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Calvin Chen

Chemistry Pre-Pharmacy Concentration, 1:00PM-2:15PM
OPTICAL MEMORY BEHAVIOR IN GOLD CORE – SILVER SHELLED NANOPARTICLES | | The demand for higher information digital storage ability has been increasing over the years. Current methods used in storage information contain problems such as a lack of electromagnetic radiation resistance and short life spans. Optical memory, a third potential form of information storage, has the potential to improve upon these cons. However, optical memory lacks acceptable mediums (compounds) that could be used to improve digital storage capabilities. This study is done to further explore and understand additional mediums for potential in optical memory devices. Photoluminescent studies of gold core silver shelled nanoparticles are reported. Laser excitation of 280 nm for gold core silver shelled nanoparticles at 78 K results in a decrease in luminescence intensity with increasing laser exposure time indicating the creation of non-luminescing species. A series of particles with varying sizes are reported with varying intensity reductions upon laser excitation dependent upon silver shell sizing. Increasing the sample temperature to 25 K results in the non-luminescing species going back to the original gold core silver shelled nanoparticle. | | Faculty Mentor: Howard... Read More →
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Kevin Dietz

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Sythesis and Characterization of Tungsten Oxide Nanowires | | Hexagonal phase tungsten oxide nanowires (hex-WO3) were synthesized and found to have high activity for converting glucose to hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and Lactic Acid platform chemicals that are promising for p... Read More →
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Graham Van Goffrier

Physics, Electrical Engineering, Minor: Mathematics, Minor: Nanotechnology, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Investigating a Correlation between Minimal Surfaces and Relativistic String Dynamics | | In bosonic string theory, the solutions to the string equations of motion may be expressed as two-dimensional manifolds in a relativistic spacetime. This research project sought to investigate the correspondence between these... Read More →
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Laura Hartman

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Frozen Volcano: Quantitatively Sourcing Ice Core Tephra Paleoclimate reconstructions from multiple ice cores rely on an accurately developed time scale. The best ice core dating method available is based on annual layer counting, which can be verified by radiometric dating and volcanic-based time markers. Volcanic time markers are identified in ice cores as sulfate peaks that coincide in time with known tropical volcanic eruptions. It is assumed that a large sulfate signal represents a section of the ice core that also contains volcanic particulates. To verify the affiliation of large sulfate peaks in ice cores with specific volcanic sources, geochemical fingerprinting of volcanic particles (tephra) extracted from ice cores is a common method. However, recent studies have suggested that there is a disconnect between the expected sulfate aerosol source and the tephra geochemical fingerprint. In this study we focus on the development of new methodology to improve quantitative geochemical measurements of very fine ( | | Faculty Mentor: Andrei... Read More →
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Muhammad Hossen

Chemistry, Bioengineering, 9:15AM-10:30AM, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Dry & Wet Stiffness Increase and Structure Stabilization of Cellulose Nanofibrils (CNF) Aerogels in Aqueous Environment (Room 4 Presenter 3, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Porous cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) based aerogels are capable of absorbing and storing a significant amount of liquid inside the 3D structure. As the porosity of the CNF aerogels goes higher, the amount of liquid absorption increases linearly. One of the biggest problems of 3D CNF aerogels with high porosity is that the structure breaks down very rapidly in aqueous environments. Here we describe a method to overcome this deficiency by adding methacrylate functionalized carboxymethyl cellulose (MetCMC) into the CNF system followed by crosslinking between the methacrylate groups of MetCMC. The resultant polymer composite matrix successfully maintains a robust 3D structure without collapsing when rewetted and stored in aqueous environments. When rewetted CNF-MetCMC composite is freeze dried it maintains its size and shape whereas air drying causes shrinkage of the volume. Air dried CNF-MetCMC swells and increases in volume to some extent when rewetted. A greater mass fraction of CNF in the whole composition stabilizes the air dried structure against swelling in an aqueous environment. Cross-linking between methacrylate groups enhances the dry and wet modulus of CNF-MetCMC aerogels | | Co-authors: Alexander Lafrance, Matthew Talbot, Michael D Mason | | Measurement of Porosity of CNF Aerogels Using Silicone Oil (Section A Poster 27, 9:15AM-10:30AM) | | Freeze drying of aqueous slurries of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with different wt% of water generates CNF aerogels with different porosities. Measurement of CNF... Read More →
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Jacquelynn Miller

Earth and Climate Sciences, 1:00PM-2:15PM
GROUND PENETRATING RADAR AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE DELINEATION: QUANTIFYING RAPIDLY ERODING SHELL MIDDENS ALONG THE COAST OF MAINE | | Approximately 2000 aboriginal shell middens along the coast of Maine archive a unique record of cultural and climatic change, but these archaeological sites are lost to the sea through climate-driven coastal erosion and sea-level rise. Coastal middens are the result of pre-European accumulation of centimeters to meters of clam and/or oyster shells, with associated artifacts and faunal remains, and are records of past lifeways and environmental conditions. Additionally, analysis of faunal remains from these sites chronicles 5,000 years of Gulf of Maine coastal paleoenvironmental conditions. Currently, Maine lacks an informed plan of shell midden site monitoring and rescue because characterization has focused on expensive and destructive archaeological excavation. This project employs ground penetrating radar (GPR) to obtain high-resolution site extent and stratigraphic data using an efficient, cost-effective, and nondestructive survey method. GPR records below surface stratigraphy by noting differences in the electrical properties of the material that reflect variations in layer composition, compaction, grain size, or water content. A traditional geographic information system (GIS) comparison of aerial photography time-series allows quantification of shoreline erosion through time, but results indicate the need for an improved technique to understand rates of midden loss. This research will lead to the creation of a monitoring, preservation, and rescue plan for coastal shell middens in the state of Maine. As sea level continues to rise, and sites and the information they hold are currently disappearing, the need for the application of GPR and shoreline change studies of coastal shell midden sites in Maine is critical. | | Faculty Mentor: Alice... Read More →
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Matthew Moyet

Biology, Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Photodegradation of the Harmful Pesticide Carbaryl using Bismuth Nanoparticles | | We explore the use of bismuth nanoparticles and study their effect on the photodegradation of the pesticide carbaryl. Current methods of water treatment are ineffective at removing this harmful contaminant. Use of photocatalytic compounds allow treatment facilities to operate more efficiently and at lower operating costs. Industrial standards such as titanium dioxide were ineffective at degrading carbaryl using ultraviolet irradiation. Bismuth oxyhalides proved to be an effective alternative due to their increased conductance within the band gap. Bismuth nanoparticles were hypothesized to be more efficient due to a smaller band gap in the absence of electron-donating ligands. We synthesized a series of Bismuth nanoparticles and tested their photocatalytic capacity in the photodegradation of the harmful pesticide carbaryl. Nanoparticles were characterized using TEM, Raman, and X-Ray Diffraction. To monitor the degradation of carbaryl, we utilized luminescence spectroscopy to measure the rate of degradation over time. | | Faculty Mentor: Howard... Read More →
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Dadoo Nayereh

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs)-based hydrogels for biomaterials applications | | Hydrogels are 3D polymeric networks with high water content and are widely being investigated for biomedical applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery. Polysaccharides have been used to fabricate hydrogels due to their natural abundance, biocompatibility, and immunogeniety. Additionally, polysaccharide-based hydrogels can provide mechanical and biological cues similar to those of the natural environments. Native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are prepared in large scales from pulp by mechanical grinding methods in low cost. CNF hydrogels has been reported previously as scaffolds for tissue engineering because their fibrillar structure mimics the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Even at low polymer concentration, strong hydrogen bonding leads to physically cross-linked CNF hydrogels that lack stability and mechanical strength. Therefore, covalent cross-linking is need to provide the required stiffness and stability to the hydrogel. Current methods to covalently cross-link CNF suffer from either low cell viability or long gelation time. Also, these methods do not allow for spatiotemporal modification of the scaffold. Regarding these issues, CNF was functionalized with norbornene groups followed by light-induced thiol-norbornene cross-linking reaction to form hydrogels. Thiol-norbornene reaction is a fast and specific reaction and it is benign to live cells. Using this method, CNF-based hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties have been made and characterized. Enzymatic degradation of CNF, functionalized CNF, and CNF-based hydrogels have also been studied. | | Faculty Mentor: William... Read More →
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Aaron Nicholas

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Microfabrication Design of Copper-Iodide Nanoparticle Based Sensors for Hostile Chemical Environments Copper (I) iodide (CuI) films have been previously reported as viable chemical sensors in the detection of volatile and harmful chemicals such as nerve and blister agents. In practice these films suffer from slow reaction times and high limits of detection. Modern sensors must be tailored for the unique demands of military operations, space travel, and industrial manufacturing and so must be flexible in design, wearable, reusable, and adaptable to new situations. For this project we envision the construction of a wearable sensor prototype using a highly controlled microfabrication synthesis of CuI nanoparticles. Because the nanoparticle microfabrication process can be automated, it is possible to remotely design sensors and digitally transfer sensor blueprints to field computers for printing. This technique allows for on demand printing of sensors utilizing a simple remote printing method. We have completed the Phase I of this project by synthesizing a series of CuI nanoparticles and exposing them to a variety of nucleophiles. Results show that these nanoparticles mimic their CuI cousins by emitting at different wavelengths depending on the chemical exposed. These nanoparticles outcompete previous CuI films but emitting brighter and changing color at a faster rate making them excellent candidates for Phase II sensor design. | | Faculty Mentor: Howard... Read More →
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Hathaithep Senkum

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Synthesizing Amphiphilic Block Copolymers to prevent Marine Biofouling | | Adhesion of marine fouling on surfaces such as ship hulls, pipelines, and fishing nets causes higher fuel consumption and maintenance costs. Previously, tributytin-containing paints were used to prevent the marine settlement effectively, but they were toxic to marine animals. More environmentally friendly, amphiphilic block copolymers phase separate in nanoscale to reduce marine fouling. These amphiphilic coatings consist of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions on the surface that play a role in inhibiting protein adhesion and releasing fouling, respectively. Bottlebrush amphiphilic block copolymers have dense branches of a hydrophilic domain and a hydrophobic domain off of the polymer backbone. In this research, the bottlebrush amphiphilic block copolymer of hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) side chain by using grafting-through ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) approach are synthesized. Both side chains are synthesized via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, which have oxanorbornene functional groups for subsequent polymerization of the polymer chain backbone through ROMP. For the result, the polystyrenes with degree polymerization of 8, 31, 48, 60, and 82 are synthesized via RAFT technique with low dispersity. The bottlebrush polymers containing polystyrene side chain with DP of 8 and 31 are successfully synthesized through ROMP approach with low dispersity. | | Faculty Mentor: William... Read More →
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Anushka Vithanage

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Synthesis & Ring opening polymerization of 6-alkoxymethyltetraydro-2-pyrone monomers to yield polyesters | | High consumption of fossil-based thermoplastic polymers have raised economic and environmental concerns, highlighting the need for renewable alternatives. Recent commercial renewable polyesters such as polylactic acid have delivered moderately comparable properties to certain fossil-based polymers, but suffer from several drawbacks such as low moisture resistance, brittleness and low working temperature. These limitations decrease their water barrier properties and make them unsuitable for high strength, high temperature applications. To overcome these limitations, novel renewable polyesters that have improved properties over existing material are needed. This work presents ring opening polymerization of a new, renewably sourced monomer, 6-alkoxymethyltetrahydro-2-pyrone, which is a lactone molecule bearing an alkoxy side group. This side functionality can potentially be altered to include aromatic moieties or changed from less to more bulky, yielding a library of monomers. Upon ring opening polymerization, these monomers can yield a series of polymers with enhanced and tunable properties. This research, therefore, spans three phases, which are monomer synthesis, polymerization, chemical and physical analysis. Currently, the 6-methoxymethyltetrahydro-2-pyrone have been successfully synthesized and the control of its polymerizability along with kinetic and thermodynamic aspects are being evaluated using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and hydrogen nuclear-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) for molecular weight and chemical characterizations. Polymers that display molecular weights up to ~5000 g/ mol in GPC have already been prepared. Overall, this novel synthesis approach enables fine-tuning of physical properties via a simple step of chemically changing the side group, and is anticipated to deliver versatile polyesters with widespread uses. | | Faculty Mentor: William... Read More →
SW

Sarah Wheatley

Quaternary and Climate Studies, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Ancient Ashes: Pushing the limits of geochemical tephra analysis from ice core samples | | Analyzing ice cores offers a unique insight to paleoclimate studies. When the ice core is correctly dated, paleoclimate proxies can provide invaluable information about past climate shifts, perturbations or interactions of various climate forcers. In addition to other dating methods, it is common to use volcanic sulfate signals as independent time markers to which the ice core timescale is forced. However, recent studies have shown temporal disconnects between volcanic sulfate and tephra deposition from the same volcanic eruption. In a number of ice cores, some sequences show a lack of a sulfate aerosols signal where a layer of volcanic ash is present. Because of sample preparation and mounting limitations, only the geochemical composition of ash particles... Read More →
CW

Colin Whitton

Chemistry, 1:00PM-2:15PM
Acid/Base Defect Sites on Tungsten Oxide Clusters | | Acid/Base Defect Sites on Tungsten Oxide Clusters | Colin Whitton, Francois Amar, Brian Frederick | | Faculty Mentor: Brian Frederick | | Co-authors: François Amar | | Exploration into the uses of woody biomass to synthesize alternative biofuels is a topic currently getting a lot of attention in the scientific community. We have demonstrated that tungsten oxide based materials can catalyze the removal of oxygen from bio-oil compounds to produce alternative biofuels with higher energy density. We are using density functional theory to calculate the adsorption of probe molecules, including ammonia and pyridine, to characterize the Lewis and... Read More →

Judges

Monday April 24, 2017 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom

2:15pm

Networking Break
Monday April 24, 2017 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom

4:00pm

Social/Reception
Monday April 24, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Ballroom

5:00pm

Symposium Award Ceremony
Monday April 24, 2017 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Ballroom

6:00pm

Poster Take Down
Monday April 24, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Ballroom